Popular Conservative Books

(showing 1-50 of 500)
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The Road to Serfdom The Road to Serfdom (Paperback)
by (shelved 6 times as conservative)
avg rating 4.16 — 19,521 ratings — published 1944
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The Conservative Mind The Conservative Mind (Paperback)
by (shelved 5 times as conservative)
avg rating 4.08 — 1,816 ratings — published 1953
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Going Rogue: An American Life Going Rogue: An American Life (Hardcover)
by (shelved 4 times as conservative)
avg rating 3.28 — 12,870 ratings — published 2009
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Decision Points Decision Points (Hardcover)
by (shelved 4 times as conservative)
avg rating 3.74 — 42,410 ratings — published 2010
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Courage and Consequence: My Life as a Conservative in the Fight Courage and Consequence: My Life as a Conservative in the Fight (Hardcover)
by (shelved 4 times as conservative)
avg rating 3.78 — 1,972 ratings — published 2010
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Atlas Shrugged Atlas Shrugged (Paperback)
by (shelved 4 times as conservative)
avg rating 3.66 — 381,445 ratings — published 1957
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Witness Witness (Paperback)
by (shelved 3 times as conservative)
avg rating 4.36 — 1,895 ratings — published 1952
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Capitalism and Freedom Capitalism and Freedom (Paperback)
by (shelved 3 times as conservative)
avg rating 3.93 — 13,091 ratings — published 1962
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Intellectuals and Society Intellectuals and Society (Hardcover)
by (shelved 3 times as conservative)
avg rating 4.15 — 2,240 ratings — published 2009
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The Closing of the American Mind The Closing of the American Mind (Paperback)
by (shelved 3 times as conservative)
avg rating 3.69 — 6,344 ratings — published 1987
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The Way Things Ought to Be The Way Things Ought to Be (Paperback)
by (shelved 3 times as conservative)
avg rating 3.48 — 2,118 ratings — published 1992
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All the Trouble in the World All the Trouble in the World (Paperback)
by (shelved 3 times as conservative)
avg rating 3.88 — 1,452 ratings — published 1994
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Godless: The Church of Liberalism Godless: The Church of Liberalism (Hardcover)
by (shelved 3 times as conservative)
avg rating 3.25 — 3,331 ratings — published 2006
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The Revolution: A Manifesto The Revolution: A Manifesto (Hardcover)
by (shelved 3 times as conservative)
avg rating 4.16 — 9,796 ratings — published 2008
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Economic Facts and Fallacies Economic Facts and Fallacies (Hardcover)
by (shelved 3 times as conservative)
avg rating 4.15 — 3,215 ratings — published 2007
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The Overton Window (Overton Window, #1) The Overton Window (Overton Window, #1)
by (shelved 3 times as conservative)
avg rating 3.49 — 5,702 ratings — published 2009
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See, I Told You So See, I Told You So (Paperback)
by (shelved 3 times as conservative)
avg rating 3.57 — 1,630 ratings — published 1993
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The Politically Incorrect Guide to the Bible The Politically Incorrect Guide to the Bible (Paperback)
by (shelved 2 times as conservative)
avg rating 3.84 — 323 ratings — published 2007
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Dinesh D'Souza
“In philosophy seminars, the choice is usually between good and evil. In the real world, however, the choice is often between a bad guy and a worse guy.”
Dinesh D'Souza, Letters to a Young Conservative

Jaron Lanier
“An imaginary circle of empathy is drawn by each person. It circumscribes the person at some distance, and corresponds to those things in the world that deserve empathy. I like the term "empathy" because it has spiritual overtones. A term like "sympathy" or "allegiance" might be more precise, but I want the chosen term to be slightly mystical, to suggest that we might not be able to fully understand what goes on between us and others, that we should leave open the possibility that the relationship can't be represented in a digital database.

If someone falls within your circle of empathy, you wouldn't want to see him or her killed. Something that is clearly outside the circle is fair game. For instance, most people would place all other people within the circle, but most of us are willing to see bacteria killed when we brush our
teeth, and certainly don't worry when we see an inanimate rock tossed aside to keep a trail clear.

The tricky part is that some entities reside close to the edge of the circle. The deepest controversies often involve whether something or someone should lie just inside or just outside the circle. For instance, the idea of slavery depends on the placement of the slave outside the circle, to make some people nonhuman. Widening the circle to include all people and end slavery has been one of the epic strands of the human story - and it isn't quite over yet.

A great many other controversies fit well in the model. The fight over abortion asks whether a fetus or embryo should be in the circle or not, and the animal rights debate asks the same about animals.

When you change the contents of your circle, you change your conception of yourself. The center of the circle shifts as its perimeter is changed. The liberal impulse is to expand the circle, while conservatives tend to want to restrain or even contract the circle.

Empathy Inflation and Metaphysical Ambiguity

Are there any legitimate reasons not to expand the circle as much as possible?

There are.

To expand the circle indefinitely can lead to oppression, because the rights of potential entities (as perceived by only some people) can conflict with the rights of indisputably real people. An obvious example of this is found in the abortion debate. If outlawing abortions did not involve commandeering control of the bodies of other people (pregnant women, in this case), then there wouldn't be much controversy. We would find an easy accommodation.

Empathy inflation can also lead to the lesser, but still substantial, evils of incompetence, trivialization, dishonesty, and narcissism. You cannot live, for example, without killing bacteria. Wouldn't you be projecting your own fantasies on single-cell organisms that would be indifferent to them at best? Doesn't it really become about you instead of the cause at that point?”
Jaron Lanier, You Are Not a Gadget

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