Jeff's Reviews > The Man Who Loved Books Too Much: The True Story of a Thief, a Detective, and a World of Literary Obsession

The Man Who Loved Books Too Much by Allison Hoover Bartlett
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M_50x66
's review
Mar 21, 10

bookshelves: crime
Read in March, 2010

Interesting glimpse into the world of rare and antique book collectors. The story is part detective, a la Catch Me If You Can, a dogged, quirky, passionate Salt Lake rare book dealer in constant pursuit of the bright, talented but ultimately insecure wanna-be book collector trying to steal his way in to the elite company of the world's current and historical bibliophiles. The fraudulent means "Gilkey" devises to acquire books are topped by the painful, sometimes humorous reactions of book dealers around the country who realize they're the latest to be had. Full of insights on what makes books unique, rare, valuable and coveted, in addition to portraits of some of the world's best known collectors, and their libraries. Also riddled with citations and thoughts from well-known names throughout history regarding reading, knowledge, and education.

Not quite what I was expecting, but a short, fun, insightful read nonetheless.
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Jeff Interesting glimpse into the world of rare and antique book collectors. The story is part detective, a la Catch Me If You Can, a dogged, quirky, passionate Salt Lake rare book dealer in constant pursuit of the bright, talented but ultimately insecure wanna-be book collector trying to steal his way in to the elite company of the world's current and historical bibliophiles. The fraudulent means "Gilkey" devises to acquire books are topped by the painful, sometimes humorous reactions of book dealers around the country who realize they're the latest to be had. Full of insights on what makes books unique, rare, valuable and coveted, in addition to portraits of some of the world's best known collectors, and their libraries. Also riddled with citations and thoughts from well-known names throughout history regarding reading, knowledge, and education.

Not quite what I was expecting, but a short, fun, insightful read nonetheless.


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