LFPL Teen Services's Reviews > The Boy in the Striped Pajamas

The Boy in the Striped Pajamas by John Boyne
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Nine year old Bruno leads an ideal childhood in Nazi Germany. After a recent visit from the "Fury" Bruno’s father, an "important man" is reassigned to "Out-With." Bruno thinks his father must have done something to make the Fury mad for him to send the family to such a dreadful place. From Bruno’s bedroom window, he can see many people living on the other side of a tall fence that seems to stretch on forever. The people don’t seem very happy, and they certainly aren’t very clean. The oddest thing of all, though, is the fact that all the people are wearing matching striped pajamas. Bruno sets out to explore, despite strict warnings from his father that he is to stay away from the fence and the people living on the other side. Bruno discovers a boy about his age and, by meeting and talking every day, they become good friends. One day, Bruno is determined to find out what life is like on the other side of the fence. His friend, Shmuel, sneaks him a pair of pajamas, Bruno changes out of his clothes, lifts the barbed wire, and easily slips beneath the fence. Bruno doesn’t like the place at all. It’s too crowded and muddy, and it has begun to rain. Just as he has decided to go home, soldiers come to round up a group of people and take them on a march. Bruno is not sure where they are going, but hopes the march won’t take long because he’ll be in trouble if he’s not home in time for dinner. Thankfully, the march ends in a large building; Bruno is glad to be out of the rain. Suddenly, the room goes black and he grabs Shmuel’s hand. Bruno is never heard from again. It will take his grieving parents months to guess at his true fate.
Lindsey.
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message 1: by Ruth (new)

Ruth Mcdermott Hi there

I noticed you have some strong views about The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas, which makes you an ideal person for me to ask if you would you like to put a question to John Boyne himself about his book? BBC World Book Club is interviewing him on Tuesday 23rd February and would love to hear from you. If you could email me at ruth.mcdermott@bbc.co.uk as soon as you can with your question about the book (anything - doesn't have to be particularly clever!), we can either arrange for you to talk to the man himself, or have our presenter put your question to John for you. Then you get to hear your question on World Service Radio! Please get in touch soonest, including where you are in the world and contact details.

Thanks, and all the best.

Ruth McDermott, BBC World Book Club
ruth.mcdermott@bbc.co.uk
http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/art...



message 2: by Ruth (new)

Ruth Mcdermott Hi there

I noticed you have some strong views about The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas, which makes you an ideal person for me to ask if you would you like to put a question to John Boyne himself about his book? BBC World Book Club is interviewing him on Tuesday 23rd February and would love to hear from you. If you could email me at ruth.mcdermott@bbc.co.uk as soon as you can with your question about the book (anything - doesn't have to be particularly clever!), we can either arrange for you to talk to the man himself, or have our presenter put your question to John for you. Then you get to hear your question on World Service Radio! Please get in touch soonest, including where you are in the world and contact details.

Thanks, and all the best.

Ruth McDermott, BBC World Book Club
ruth.mcdermott@bbc.co.uk
http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/art...



message 3: by Robby (new)

Robby Chandra Bruno did in fact have an ideal childhood, hidden away from the actual truth, beyond his home. Even when he was brought into a very desolate location called 'Out-With' (Auschwitz), he still has no clue that his father is the commandant of the concentration camp and that his friend 'Samuel' is being prosecuted for being Jewish. It didn't exactly go into fine details or the true look into the holocaust but it does give young readers and students a glance of the perspective of a 9 year old boy in a German family, who only later finds that he suffers the consequences too, even if he didn't know about it. It was utterly sad, and brought out raw emotions for me, to see Bruno's demise, if when he was so innocent and young to see the atrocity and horrors that these people committed.


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