Ruth's Reviews > Becoming Lucy

Becoming Lucy by Martha   Rogers
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F_50x66
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Dec 12, 09

Read in December, 2009

Junky smarmy sacchrine sweet Christian romance. Nuff said.
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Margaret uh oh


Renee things are not looking so good for this one!


message 3: by Steven (new) - added it

Steven You just described an entire genre. What did you expect? I mean, every book in the category is "Junky smarmy sacchrine sweet Christian romance." Either you like that style, or you don't. But don't complain when Christian historical romance/fiction does exactly what every reader expects it to do.

Again--what did you expect?


Margaret I take complete offense to that. That is not anywhere near what most are like. Maybe those published mid-1990s and before, but not these days.

Steven wrote: "You just described an entire genre. What did you expect? I mean, every book in the category is "Junky smarmy sacchrine sweet Christian romance." Either you like that style, or you don't. But do..."




message 5: by Steven (new) - added it

Steven Pardon me--I was unclear. I am not knocking the books or the genre. I just thought a review that derided a Christian romance for being a "sweet Christian romance" was a review to which I had to respond.

I admit, "smarmy" does not apply to all of them, certainly. And I don't know what the reviewer means by 'junky,' so I can't comment on that either way. As for 'sacchrine,' a male reader like myself is probably going to apply that term to many more romances than you might. But again--there's nothing wrong with that. A lot of readers love that stuff. I have enjoyed it myself as often as not.


Margaret Plenty can be "sweet Christian romance" and that is fine, and they probably will mostly be more so that most male readers prefer... but this one was over the top so the extra four adjectives of sugar were not a compliment (In my opinion of course as I cannot read her mind *grin*). Having mostly read this book myself, and stopping because it was over the top in sweetness I can say that.

However, I have heard that some people loved this book.

I forgive you. I just had to pounce on someone knocking my genre. (Forgive me for pouncing...)


message 7: by Steven (new) - added it

Steven Gotcha. Now I really have to read this. Not only have I known Martha all my life (super-smart English teacher, she was), but I have attended fiction-writing groups with/led by her. Our styles are different, of course, but I love touching moments, particularly in a horrific tale of suffering, like Les Mis or whatever (my favorite). I'm curious about where to draw the line between sweet and over-the-top.

My own writing has not met anything like the blockbuster success of Mrs. Rogers---and her entire genre. They must be doing something right, huh?


message 8: by Steven (new) - added it

Steven If it was so sweet, you had to stop, my wife would probably LOVE it!


message 9: by Steven (new) - added it

Steven (Howdy! Mrs. Rogers!!)


Margaret I'll go back to it one day when my TBR pile dies down... that I have promised. Either that or when I'm just really "in the mood" for it. :)


message 11: by Ruth (new) - rated it 2 stars

Ruth The orginal comments were mine. Basically I found the main female character and her family to be too good to be true. I found the descriptive language to be overdone. I found the religious aspects overdone and question whether most real people would live their faith in the manner that Lucille does.

I have read Christian romances which, while I'll agree they were no literary classics, were about real-sounding people who reacted to things in ways similar to people I know.


Margaret Agreed!! (Although I did not read it in entirety).

Ruth wrote: "The orginal comments were mine. Basically I found the main female character and her family to be too good to be true. I found the descriptive language to be overdone. I found the religious aspec..."




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