Elizabeth's Reviews > Snobs

Snobs by Julian Fellowes
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Oct 15, 2009

it was amazing
bookshelves: a-beautiful-disaster, england, fiction, europe
Read in October, 2009

Wow. this guy really nailed it. This book reminded me of someone paring a fish with the ease of a surgeon. Fellows examines social protocol in a certain circle by flaking it from the chaos of conversation, holding it up to the light, and explaining exactly why everything about it is preposterous.

Ever wonder why some people call each other Sausage or Toffee? Turn to page 44. Want to know Fellow's theory about the patented British "stiff upper lip"? Try page 35. Or find out who fits this brilliant character description: "He talked of himself and his triumphs in that relaxed unselfconscious way that only the deeply egocentric can manage" (Hint, Page 107.)

Fellow's writing is beautiful and complicated. He's a mannered writer in the old-fashioned style of Warton and James, and his story is filled with expert plot twists. I was completely enthralled.
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02/01 marked as: read

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Sylvia Tedesco I liked your comment "Fellows examines social protocol in a certain circle by flaking it from the chaos of conversation, holding it up to the light, and explaining exactly why everything about it is preposterous. " I haven't been finding the book "fizzy" at all -- it seems extremely careful and serious at heart. The reactions and snobbism can correlate well to our own lives. I liked the comment in the book that Lady Uckfield always called him "Mr Russell" so that he wouldn't call her "Googie".
I have been watching "The Girlfriend Experience" on Starz and was interested in some of the viewer comments that the actress playing the high end escort was not pretty enough. I saved a part of the book "Snobs" when Edith was dressed for a party. She was wearing the "little black numb er". "It was well-cut, quite expensive....and she wore no ornament. She looked pretty and snappy with that slight tang of severity a certain kind of Englishman finds intriguing".


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