Mike (the Paladin)'s Reviews > Brave New World

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
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Sep 25, 13

bookshelves: science-fiction

Maybe not the best written book ever, but a lot to say. Recommended. This book I read some years ago and the picture it shows of the "Brave New World" is not a pleasant one. It is however somewhat familiar and I suppose that's why it disturbs. The despotism pictured here is a sort of "soft" despotism. It only destroys you if you can't be "melded" into your "place" in society.

The picture of "bred" humans filling predestined spots in a world where thinking is a thing of the past is only a part of the horror. While as I said it may not be the best writing nor the most accurate of prophecies, it's a book that can still open eyes if allowed to.

Update: I first reviewed this a couple of years ago. I said above that it may not be "the most accurate of prophecies". I'm beginning to wonder as I watch the way things are progressing. More and more it seems to me that while we've been watching and preparing for a threat like that in the1984 mode we've been moving more and more into a world like the one presented here.

Again I'd recommend you take a look at this book, and think about it.

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Comments (showing 1-18 of 18) (18 new)

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message 1: by Adam (new) - added it

Adam Light I just found this at the library for a buck. Definitely on my short-list.


Mike (the Paladin) I read this in high school. Interesting read.

Interesting bit of trivia (well interesting to me any way, LOL) Aldous Huxley, C.S.Lewis and John Kennedy all died on the same day (of course the other two didn't get much press because of the assassination). There is an interesting novel Between Heaven & Hell that pictures a conversation between the 3 just after death.


message 3: by Adam (new) - added it

Adam Light That is a curious bit of trivia, Mike. Now you have my wheels spinning. There's another book I will have to check out.


Alexandra Swann I think a lot about Brave New World in context of the crazy things going on the real world.


Mike (the Paladin) I know. It's begun to seem more and more apropos.

By the way, did you note the typos in the review...oops. Thanks for bringing my attention back to it. LOL.


Alexandra Swann Mike (the Paladin) wrote: "I know. It's begun to seem more and more apropos.

By the way, did you note the typos in the review...oops. Thanks for bringing my attention back to it. LOL."


I didn't even see them. I read fast and, unfortunately, I type fast, which results in typos in my own reviews.


Mike (the Paladin) I do that to. Every time my attention gets drawn back to a review I seem to find typos.


Alexandra Swann Mike (the Paladin) wrote: "I do that to. Every time my attention gets drawn back to a review I seem to find typos."

I know how you feel. I do that with my blog posts, reviews--everything. And then I'm embarrassed. Sigh.


Mike (the Paladin) I'm only embarrassed when I leave out a critical word (like "not". I saw you did that on a post, but I knew what you meant. Still, it reverses the meaning of the document and can be awkward.) or when I accidentally type the wrong word and spell check doesn't catch it because it "is a word". I actually went to type "like" once. If you look at your keyboard the "l" and the "k" are side by side...I accidentally hit the "k" for the first letter, "l" in "like". Looked really bad. I don't know how long it was before I caught it.


Alexandra Swann My mistakes are too many to number!


message 12: by Sean (new) - rated it 5 stars

Sean I read this book in my Modern Lit class in high school. The book has apparently generated a lot of controversy over the years on whether or not it should be taught in high schools. Our final assignment for the class was to make an argument why the book should or should not be taught in high school. Great book, interesting assignment. When I run into my teacher these days, we still seem to talk and argue about this book, close to 10 years after she introduced me to it.


Alexandra Swann Sean wrote: "I read this book in my Modern Lit class in high school. The book has apparently generated a lot of controversy over the years on whether or not it should be taught in high schools. Our final assign..."

And what was your position--that is should or should not be taught? Just curious.

I read Brave New World as a teenager. I certainly do not share or agree with Huxley's world view, but I think that there is nothing wrong with allowing teenagers to read this type of fiction to allow them to understand how utopians think. It is a great book and there are a lot of parallels to the social engineering taking place now.


Mike (the Paladin) No, Huxley and I would...strongly disagree, on most everything. There's an irony in that as the world has gone to a great extent the way he'd have wanted and it's producing the world he warned about in his novel.


Alexandra Swann Mike (the Paladin) wrote: "No, Huxley and I would...strongly disagree, on most everything. There's an irony in that as the world has gone to a great extent the way he'd have wanted and it's producing the world he warned abou..."

It is ironic. And in real life Huxley was very much a socialist, which begs the question of why he wrote Brave New World. Did he secretly think the world he outlined there was good? He had a genuine contempt for liberty, so maybe the book is some kind of dark prophecy for the future. I don't know; I am just speculating.


Mike (the Paladin) I think the way he ends the book may be a bit telling. His view of that says a lot about how he sees what might be called "both sides".


message 17: by Sean (new) - rated it 5 stars

Sean My position was that it should be taught because it is a challenging dystopian view of the world. Also, since many teenagers just want to goof around, have fun, and seek pleasure over responsibility, I think the book is a good way to show how horrible a world it would be if everything was decided for you and you really did just live for pleasure. ...


Alexandra Swann Sean wrote: "My position was that it should be taught because it is a challenging dystopian view of the world. Also, since many teenagers just want to goof around, have fun, and seek pleasure over responsibilit..."

True!


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