Dianne's Reviews > Good Harbor

Good Harbor by Anita Diamant
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Sep 24, 09


The story involved breast cancer – DCIS – which I have had, and it was somewhat interesting to read about that. However, I didn’t get it at all when the woman’s first and only reaction to the mastectomy option was horror…wouldn’t even consider it. That seemed unrealistic to me, that she didn’t at least acknowledge the worth of mastectomy.

Um, it was good, I guess. I mean, I stayed interested and all, but it just seemed a little too simple, contrived; made use of too many tired stereotypes. The friendship was too contrived.
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Marianne Many people have difficulty accepting the mastectomy option, even when evidence based, so Kathleen's reaction there was quite believable to me. I should explain that I work in mammography, so have met many women who express this fear when having mammography examinations in a 'well woman' setting and no cancer is diagnosed, as well as in a symptomatic setting.
We must remember that an individual's situation and experience is not universal.


Dianne Marianne wrote: "Many people have difficulty accepting the mastectomy option, even when evidence based, so Kathleen's reaction there was quite believable to me. I should explain that I work in mammography, so have ..."

I'm not quite sure what your point to me was, short of desiring to "enlighten" me and, perhaps, scold me (i.e., "We must remember...").

I never have believed my situation and experience is universal, and I certainly know that thinking about a mastectomy is no picnic.

You'll notice that I said the woman's "first and only" reaction to mastectomy was horror. While horror (or some other word expressing shock and fear) is often a first reaction (to almost any cancer treatment), most women move beyond their first reactions -- to *all* the various options -- and begin the painful process of figuring out what will be the final decision for themselves.

I would have liked the author to more accurately portray the deeper, more thoughtful (albeit psychologically difficult) medical decision-making process most women go through. This aspect of the book, like many other aspects of it, was simply too simplified.


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