K.D. Absolutely's Reviews > The Return of the King

The Return of the King by J.R.R. Tolkien
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Jun 15, 12

bookshelves: 1001-core, 501, modern-library, favorites, time-100, fantasy, series
Recommended to K.D. by: 501 Must Read Books; 1001 Books You Must Read Before You Die (2006-2010); TFG100 Most Favorite Books; Time 100; Metalist 100 by Newsweek; Guardian's 100
Read from June 07 to 15, 2012 — I own a copy, read count: 1

What else can I say? I enjoyed all these three books included in
The Lord of the Rings

The Fellowship of the Ring (The Lord of the Rings, #1) by J.R.R. Tolkien (5 STARS), The Two Towers (The Lord of the Rings, #2) by J.R.R. Tolkien (5 STARS) and now
The Return of the King (The Lord of the Rings, #3) by J.R.R. Tolkien(5 STARS).

It has the most tight interesting plot, memorable characters and universal unending theme: the triumph of good over evil. In fact, in the closing scene of the book, Frodo gives the book he wrote to Sam, the world's greatest gardener. The title of the book is The Downfall of the Lord of the Rings and the Return of the King. The "lord" refers to the evil king Sauron whose disappears in the wind when the ring falls to the Mount of Doom together with Gollum and the "king" refers to Aragorn who comes back as the rightful heir of the king's throne in Minas Tirith, the city capital of Gondor.

No matter in which race, nationality and religion you belong, it is always nice to know that the good persists in the end. The hobbits belong to the powerless race. The elves, dwarves and men in Tolkien's Middle-Earth have all the special powers, skills or natural physique and they helped the hobbits in defeating the evil Sauron and the traitor Saruman. However, if you really think about it, maybe more than half of the effort was contributed by Frodo Baggins (whose sacrifice was both internal and external as he fights the demon that tempts him to use the ring for selfish end), Samwise "Sam" Gamgee (for taking care of Frodo and for being an interim ring-bearer when Frodo was bitten by Shelob), Peregrine "Pippin" Took (for his presence of mind in throwing the elven brooch so Aragorn would find him and his cousin and also for killing the troll officer during the final battle at the Mouth of Sauron) and lastly Pippin's bestfriend and cousin, Meriadoc "Merry" Brandybuck (said to be the most intelligent Hobbit who figured out the password to the cave of Moria and for killing Nazgul fulfilling the prophecy that the latter would be killed not by a man. Merry was knighted by King Eomer as the Knight of the Mark).

I mean, they are all small creatures, between 2 and 4 feet in height, they don't have special skills and yet they persisted. They are the main heroes of this book. How about us who are more than 4, 5, 6 feet? They are really inspiring, right?

It took me 3 days to finish this book but I spent 5 days reading the very interesting although densely printed appendices. The Numeroneans (Appendix A) are very interesting because it traces the history of Middle-Earth from the first king to the start of the LOTR including the love story of Aragorn and Arwen who marry each other when Aragorn is made king of Gondor at the end of Book 3. Appendix B is useful if you want to know the chronology of Middle-Earth events and you don't have the time to read the long narrative texts. Appendix C has the multi-layered family trees. Appendix D has the Shire Calendar, Appendix E, their language and spelling and Appendix F has the language of the people of the Third Age. I mean, for a low-profile Oxford professor to come out with all details regarding Middle-Earth, it's just unthinkable and something that has been not been duplicated since then, right?

I am still in awe while writing this review. I cannot stop admiring this book. I can go on and on but I don't want to bore you. Just take my word for it: if you don't like fantasy genre because you perceive it as shallow and juvenile, try this. This is the fantasy book that does not insult your intelligence. It is entertaining and bewildering. Unforgettable read.
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Comments (showing 1-8 of 8) (8 new)

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jzhunagev The lord refers to the evil king Sauron whose disappears in the wind when the ring falls to the Mount of Doom together with Gollum and the king refers to Aragorn who comes back as the rightful heir of the king's throne in Minas Tirith, the city capital of Mordor.

Minas Tirith is the capital city of Gondor. :D


message 2: by K.D. (last edited Jun 15, 2012 11:14PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

K.D. Absolutely Kasi naman, nagta-type pa ako, may comments ka na hak hak

But yes, Jzhun. Thanks for pointing that out. They are kind of confusing: Gondor and Mordor. Then there is Eriador and Farngor. All these r's hak hak.


message 3: by Riadiani (new)

Riadiani Marcelita I have seen all the three LOTR movies and I absolutely love it. I can never get bored watching this trilogy, and I can't wait to start reading the books. It's interesting to know that in the book it was Merry who killed the Nazgul, whereas in the movie it was Eowyn who killed it. Anyway, it's a very beautiful and fantastical story!


K.D. Absolutely Riadiani, I agree. It was shortened. I also think that they needed to give a meatier role for Eowyn because the character was played by that famous and beautiful actress. Thanks.


Janith Pathirage Read Silmarillion as well. It's a good background reading for the LOR trilogy. It reveals a great deal of secrets behind the formation of the middle earth and lot of fascinating stuff we never knew before, like the rise and fall of Mogoth. Sauron was just a servant of Mogoth, so you can imagine what I'm talking about :). Don't want to give away any spoilers so I want say any more , lol . enjoy..


K.D. Absolutely Janith wrote: "Read Silmarillion as well. It's a good background reading for the LOR trilogy. It reveals a great deal of secrets behind the formation of the middle earth and lot of fascinating stuff we never knew..."

I find it difficult to read, Janith. Good for you. :) Thanks.


Janith Pathirage K.D. wrote: "Janith wrote: "Read Silmarillion as well. It's a good background reading for the LOR trilogy. It reveals a great deal of secrets behind the formation of the middle earth and lot of fascinating stuf..."

Ya not an easy read at all, and there're lot of characters you can't simply remember. Plus it was written as a history record, not the Tolkien style we're familiar with. But I recommend you to read the last chapter if you like :) (page no 431 - 367), which explains the formation of the ring, it's directly related to Lord Of The Rings


K.D. Absolutely Janith wrote: "K.D. wrote: "Janith wrote: "Read Silmarillion as well. It's a good background reading for the LOR trilogy. It reveals a great deal of secrets behind the formation of the middle earth and lot of fas..."

Thanks, Janith. I will try to read it again someday. Maybe I was just not in the mood the couple of times I tried. :)


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