Tressa 's Reviews > Small World

Small World by Tabitha King
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Jun 19, 09

bookshelves: horror, scifi
Read in January, 1987

This was one of the first Tabitha King books I ever read, and it's a doozy. I've always had a childhood fascination with miniatures--people, furniture, houses--and this horror/scifi book let me indulge my fantasies of possessing one. But I would treat my little person much better than the man did in this book.
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Comments (showing 1-22 of 22) (22 new)

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message 1: by Kandice (new)

Kandice I read The Trap, and it was excellent! It's scary in a non-paranormal way.

I'll have to look for this one.


Tressa The Trap is another good Tabitha King book. The idea of one's home being invaded and being at the mercy of men who want to do harm to you is one I can't imagine experiencing. The rape scene in that book was hard to handle.


message 3: by Joe (new) - added it

Joe it would be another story to be the little person though. how scary!


Tressa Ha, well, sure it would. How helpless would you feel living in a doll house and stared at by a giant nutter?


message 5: by pocketsizedman (new)

pocketsizedman The dollhouse might not be so bad. The nutter would be another story.


Tressa 'Twould be cool to live in a dollhouse.


message 7: by pocketsizedman (new)

pocketsizedman Tressa wrote: "'Twould be cool to live in a dollhouse."

I agree! Especially if it also had a hot tub! Now if I was writing "Small World" there'd be a dollhouse sized hot tub! :)


Tressa I have always been fascinated with miniature houses and furniture and people and clothing. I played with my doll houses and Weeble houses for hours and hours.


Whispers from the Pirate's Ghost Whisper I think the sci-fi version of this theme would be The Microcolony?

I'll try the Horror version!


Tressa Not many details on that book, Hugh. Tabitha King is a wonderful writer. Small World is the first book of hers I read and I read it back when it first came out. Still have my original copy.


message 11: by pocketsizedman (new)

pocketsizedman Me too! When I played, (not with dollhouses) I always wanted to become the miniature (!) Which is why I've gravitated to literary and cinematic works such as "Small World," "Gulliver's Travels," "The Littles," and "The Indian in the Cupboard." I thought it'd be cool to be so small. Lovely fantasy.


Tressa It is. Oh, I always loved The Incredible Shrinking Man, too, although his outcome wasn't so peachy.


message 13: by pocketsizedman (new)

pocketsizedman Tressa wrote: "It is. Oh, I always loved The Incredible Shrinking Man, too, although his outcome wasn't so peachy."

No. Not peachy. Although a bit open-ended, as there was the suggestion that Robert Cary would shrink into a new world. But geez, what kind of world would that be? No pizza. As I remember he had a pretty good dollhouse to live in before the cat ruined everything. It had a nice balcony.


message 14: by Tressa (last edited Sep 15, 2011 01:56PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Tressa I agree. I would have killed for that house if I were knee high to a grasshopper. That darn cat and his need to swat at moveable play toys.

It always blows my mind to think of him standing in front of that basement window screen, and the tiny square piece of the screen is as big as a door!

I never really did understand the ending. Surely to God an ant would carry him off to its queen. Or a bird swoop down and snap him up.


message 15: by pocketsizedman (new)

pocketsizedman Tressa wrote: "I agree. I would have killed for that house if I were knee high to a grasshopper. That darn cat and his need to swat at moveable play toys.

It always blows my mind to think of him standing in fro..."


The tiny man swooped up by an ant or a bird...that certainly would have been a downer. As bad as the ending to "The Fly?" Remember? The tiny fly body with the man's head being eaten by a spider? Yuk! Still haunts me. I don't like to think about nasty things that would happen to miniature people. Just nice ones.

The metaphysical ending to "The Incredible Shrinking Man" was always considered one of the more intelligent contributions to the sci-fi genre. Did you ever see the "Mork and Mindy" parody of "The Incredible Shrinking Man?" Really dumb. Mork shrank to a land of comedians! :(


Tressa All I can think about is how the Shrinking Man would have to constantly battle for his life against nature's predators. Wow, what a bummer ending of a day. Now I'm depressed, lol.

I never knew that about him shrinking into a new world. I read the novella a time or two, but it's been years. Maybe it's explained better in the book; I don't remember. Open-ended movies are always more difficult to ponder over because at least the book has some passages you can read back over to find a better explanation or a clue you might have missed.

You must be my age or a really young person who loves old pop culture. I was an avid M&M viewer, but don't remember that stupid episode.


message 17: by pocketsizedman (new)

pocketsizedman Tressa wrote: "All I can think about is how the Shrinking Man would have to constantly battle for his life against nature's predators. Wow, what a bummer ending of a day. Now I'm depressed, lol.

I never knew tha..."


Didn't mean to depress you. I have that way about me...

Matheson wrote the screenplay from his novel, so I imagine the metaphysical ending is about the same, although it's been years since I've read the book. I should revisit it. Too bad the guy doesn't stop shrinking at about the dollhouse size. Then his wife would have a nice tiny husband - not such a bad thing- but she'd have to get the cat adopted. I need to rewrite the whole thing and include a hot tub for the dollhouse.

(Matheson also wrote The Twilight Zone episode with the monster on the airplane wing. Another image from my youth. Yes, I'm probably your age....37! ;)


message 18: by Joe (new) - added it

Joe Tressa wrote: "Ha, well, sure it would. How helpless would you feel living in a doll house and stared at by a giant nutter?"

It would be weird to be on either side of that coin. Too bad I can't try it!


message 19: by Joseph (new) - added it

Joseph I like your review. I too was fascinated with miniatures as a kid. Always wanted to live in a dollhouse; provided someone nice was watching over me.


Tressa Thanks, Joseph. To this day I'm drawn to dollhouses in antique stores, shrunken people plots in movies, etc.


message 21: by Joseph (new) - added it

Joseph You are welcome Tressa. I too am drawn to such scenarios and I read Small World many years ago. I found Dolly a chilling character capable of shrinking her own relatives. What a fascinating plot.


Tressa I'm on my search for more books, Joseph. Will share it when I find more.


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