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Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell
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Quotes Kathryn CA Liked

Margaret Mitchell
“I loved something I made up, something that's just as dead as Melly is. I made a pretty suit of clothes and fell in love with it. And when Ashley came riding along, so handsome, so different, I put that suit on him and made him wear it whether it fitted him or not. And I wouldn't see what he really was. I kept on loving the pretty clothes—and not him at all.”
Margaret Mitchell, Gone with the Wind

Margaret Mitchell
“She could see so clearly now that he was only a childish fancy, no more important really than her spoiled desire for the aquamarine earbobs she had coaxed out of Gerald. For, once she owned the earbobs, they had lost their value, as everything except money lost its value once it was hers. ”
Margaret Mitchell, Gone with the Wind

Margaret Mitchell
“Scarlet O'Hara was not beautiful, but men seldom realized it when caught by her charm as the Tarleton twins were. In her face were too sharply blended the delicate features of her mother, a Coast aristocrat of French descent, and the heavy ones of her florid Irish father. But it was an arresting face, pointed of chin, square of jaw. Her eyes were pale green without a touch of hazel, starred with bristly black lashes and slightly tilted at the ends. Above them, her thick black brows slanted upward, cutting a startling oblique line in her magnolia-white skin-that skin so prized by Southern women and so carefully guarded with bonnets, veils and mittens against hot Georgia suns.”
Margaret Mitchell, Gone with the Wind

Margaret Mitchell
“Burdens are for shoulders strong enough to carry them.”
Margaret Mitchell, Gone with the Wind

Margaret Mitchell
“Sir,"she said,"you are no gentleman!"

An apt observation,"he answered airily."And, you, Miss, are no lady.”
Margaret Mitchell, Gone with the Wind

Margaret Mitchell
“I'd cut up my heart for you to wear if you wanted it.”
Margaret Mitchell, Gone with the Wind

Margaret Mitchell
“Child, it's a very bad thing for a woman to face the worst that can happen to her, because after she's faced the worst she can't ever really fear anything again. ...Scarlett, always save something to fear— even as you save something to love...”
Margaret Mitchell, Gone with the Wind

Margaret Mitchell
“Life was not easy, nor was it happy, but she did not expect life to be easy, and, if it was not happy, that was woman's lot. It was a man's world, and she accepted it as such. The man owned the property, and the woman managed it. The man took credit for the management, and the woman praised his cleverness. The man roared like a bull when a splinter was in his finger, and the woman muffled the moans of childbirth, lest she disturb him. Men were rough of speech and often drunk. Women ignored the lapses of speech and put the drunkards to bed without bitter words. Men were rude and outspoken, women were always kind, gracious and forgiving.”
Margaret Mitchell, Gone with the Wind

Margaret Mitchell
“Once, when she was six years old, she had fallen from a tree, flat on her stomach. She could still recall that sickening interval before breath came back into her body. Now, as she looked at him, she felt the same way she had felt then, breathless, stunned, nauseated.”
Margaret Mitchell, Gone with the Wind

Margaret Mitchell
“All wars are sacred,to those who have to fight them. If the people who started wars didn’t make them sacred, who would be foolish enough to fight? But, no matter what rallying cries the orators give to the idiots who fight, no matter what noble purposes they assign to wars, there is never but one reason for a war. And that is money. All wars are in reality money squabbles. But so few people ever realize it. Their ears are too full of bugles and drums and the fine words from stay-at-home orators. Sometimes the rallying cry is ’save the Tomb of Christ from the Heathen!’ Sometimes it’s ’down with Popery!’ and sometimes ‘Liberty!’ and sometimes ‘Cotton, Slavery and States’ Rights!”
Margaret Mitchell, Gone with the Wind
tags: money, war

Margaret Mitchell
“Say you’ll marry me when I come back or, before God, I won’t go. I’ll stay around here and play a guitar under your window every night and sing at the top of my voice and compromise you, so you’ll have to marry me to save your reputation.”
Margaret Mitchell, Gone with the Wind

Margaret Mitchell
“Hardships make or break people.”
Margaret Mitchell, Gone with the Wind

Margaret Mitchell
“There’ll always be wars because men love wars. Women don’t, but men do..”
Margaret Mitchell, Gone with the Wind
tags: war

Margaret Mitchell
“I'm riding you with a slack rein, my pet, but don't forget that I'm riding with curb and spurs just the same.”
Margaret Mitchell, Gone with the Wind

Margaret Mitchell
“Now she had a fumbling knowledge that, had she ever understood Ashley, she would never have loved him; had she ever understood Rhett, she would never have lost him.”
Margaret Mitchell, Gone with the Wind

Margaret Mitchell
“You're so brutal to those who love you, Scarlett. You take their love and hold it over their heads like a whip.”
Margaret Mitchell, Gone with the Wind

Margaret Mitchell
“And apologies, once postponed, become harder and harder to make, and finally impossible.”
Margaret Mitchell, Gone with the Wind

Margaret Mitchell
“It was not often that she was alone like this and she did not like it. When she was alone she had to think and, these days, thoughts were not so pleasant.”
Margaret Mitchell, Gone with the Wind

Margaret Mitchell
“She could not ignore life. She had to live it and it was too brutal, too hostile, for her even to try to gloss over its harshness with a smile”
Margaret Mitchell, Gone with the Wind

Margaret Mitchell
“She hasn't your strength. She's never had any strength. She's never had anything but heart.”
Margaret Mitchell, Gone with the Wind

Margaret Mitchell
“Her burdens were her own and burdens were for shoulders strong enough to bear them.”
Margaret Mitchell, Gone with the Wind

Margaret Mitchell
“Scarlett's mind went back through the years to the still hot noon at Tara when grey smoke curled above a blue-clad body and Melanie stood at the top of the stairs with Charles' sabre in her hand. Scarlett remembered that she had thought at the time: 'How silly! Melly couldn't even heft that sword!' But now she knew that had the necessity arisen, Melanie would have charged down those stairs and killed the Yankee - or been killed herself.”
Margaret Mitchell, Gone with the Wind

Margaret Mitchell
“It was this feminine conspiracy which made Southern society so pleasant. Women knew that a land where men were contented, uncontradicted ans safe in possession of unpunctured vanity was likely to be a very pleasant place for women to live. So, from the cradle to the grave, women strove to make men pleased with themselves, and the satisfied men repaid lavishly with gallantry and adoration. In fact, men willingly gave ladies everything in the world except credit for having intelligence.”
Margaret Mitchell, Gone with the Wind

Margaret Mitchell
“But, hell, I wouldn't have grudged him your body. I know how little bodies mean - especially women's bodies. But I do grudge him your heart and your dear, hard, unscrupulous mind. He doesn't want your mind, the fool, and I don't want your body. I can buy women cheap. But I do want your mind and your heart, and I'll never have them.”
Margaret Mitchell, Gone with the Wind

Margaret Mitchell
“Melanie is the gentlest of dreams and a part of my dreaming. And
if the war had not come I would have lived out my life, happily
buried at Twelve Oaks, contentedly watching life go by and never
being a part of it. But when the war came, life as it really is
thrust itself against me. The first time I went into action--it
was at Bull Run, you remember--I saw my boyhood friends blown to
bits and heard dying horses scream and learned the sickeningly
horrible feeling of seeing men crumple up and spit blood when I
shot them. But those weren't the worst things about the war,
Scarlett. The worst thing about the war was the people I had to
live with.

I had sheltered myself from people all my life, I had carefully
selected my few friends. But the war taught me I had created a
world of my own with dream people in it. It taught me what people
really are, but it didn't teach me how to live with them. And I'm
afraid I'll never learn. Now, I know that in order to support my
wife and child, I will have to make my way among a world of people
with whom I have nothing in common.”
Margaret Mitchell, Gone with the Wind

Margaret Mitchell
“For years she had had her back against the stone wall of Rhett's love and had taken it as much for granted as she had taken Melanie's love, flattering herself that she drew her strength from herself alone. And even as she had realized earlier in the evening that Melanie had been beside her in her bitter campaigns against life, now she knew that silent in the background, Rhett had stood, loving her, understanding her, ready to help. Rhett at the bazaar, reading her impatience in her eyes and leading her out in the reel, Rhett helping her out of the bondage of mourning, Rhett convoying her through the fire and explosion the night Atlanta fell, Rhett lending her the money that gave her her start, Rhett who comforted her when she woke in the nights crying with fright from her dreams-why, no man did such things without loving a woman to distraction!”
Margaret Mitchell, Gone with the Wind

Margaret Mitchell
“What’s broken is broken—and I’d rather remember it as it was at its best than mend it and see the broken places as long as I live…I’m too old to believe in such sentimentalities as clean slates and starting all over.”
Margaret Mitchell, Gone with the Wind

Margaret Mitchell
“She had never understood either of the men she had loved and so she had lost them both. Now, she had a fumbling knowledge that, had she ever understood Ashley, she would never have loved him; had she ever understood Rhett, she would never have lost him.”
Margaret Mitchell, Gone with the Wind
tags: loss, love

Margaret Mitchell
“What Melanie did was no more than all Southern girls were taught to do: to make those about them feel at ease and pleased with themselves. It was this happy feminine conspiracy which made Southern society so pleasant. Women knew that a land in which men were contented, uncontradicted, and safe in possession of unpunctured vanity was likely to be a very pleasant place for women to live. So from the cradle to the grave, women strove to make men pleased with themselves, and the satisfied men repaid lavishly with gallantry and adoration. In fact, men willingly gave the ladies everything in the world, except credit for having intelligence.

Scarlett exercised the same charms as Melanie but with a studied artistry and consummate skill. The difference between the two girls lay in the fact that Melanie spoke kind and flattering words from a desire to make people happy, if only temporarily, and Scarlett never did it except to further her own aims.”
Margaret Mitchell, Gone with the Wind

Margaret Mitchell
“Suddenly she felt strong and happy. She was not afraid of the darkness or the fog and she knew with a singing in her heart that she would never fear them again. No matter what mists might curl around her in the future, she knew her refuge. She started briskly up the street toward home and the blocks seemed very long. Far, far too long. She caught up her skirts to her knees and began to run lightly. But this time she was not running from fear. She was running because Rhett's arms were at the end of the street.”
Margaret Mitchell, Gone with the Wind

Margaret Mitchell
“But, Scarlett, did it ever occur to you that even the most deathless love could wear out?”
Margaret Mitchell, Gone with the Wind

Margaret Mitchell
“I want peace. I want to see if somewhere there isn't something left in life of charm and grace.”
Margaret Mitchell, Gone with the Wind

Margaret Mitchell
“Did it ever occur to you that I loved you as much as a man can love a woman? Loved you for years before I finally got you? During the war I'd go away and try to forget you, but I couldn't and I always had to come back. After the war I risked arrest, just to come back and find you. I cared so much I believe I would have killed Frank Kennedy if he hadn't died when he did. I loved you but I couldn't let you know it. You're so brutal to those who love you, Scarlett. You take their love and hold it over their heads like a whip.”
Margaret Mitchell, Gone with the Wind

Margaret Mitchell
“It seems we've been at cross purposes, doesn't it? But it's no use now. As long as there was Bonnie, there was a chance that we might be happy. I liked to think that Bonnie was you, a little girl again, before the war, and poverty had done things to you. She was so like you, and I could pet her, and spoil her, as I wanted to spoil you. But when she went, she took everything.”
Margaret Mitchell, Gone with the Wind

Margaret Mitchell
“Most of the misery of the world has been caused by wars. And when the wars were over, no one ever knew what they were all about.”
Margaret Mitchell, Gone With the Wind

Margaret Mitchell
“She is the only dream I ever had that lived and breathed and did not die in the face of reality.”
Margaret Mitchell, Gone With the Wind

Margaret Mitchell
“Yes, Melanie had been there that day with a sword in her small hand, ready to do battle for her. And now, as Scarlett looked sadly back, she realized that Melanie had always been there beside her with a sword in her hand, unobtrusive as her own shadow, loving her, fighting for her with blind passionate loyalty, fighting Yankees, fire, hunger, poverty, public opinion and even her beloved blood kin. Scarlett felt her courage and self-confidence ooze from her as she realized that the sword which had flashed between her and the world was sheathed forever.”
Margaret Mitchell, Gone With the Wind

Margaret Mitchell
“Life’s under no obligation to give us what we expect. We take what we get and are thankful it’s no worse than it is.”
Margaret Mitchell, Gone With the Wind

Margaret Mitchell
“Ashley watched her go and saw her square her small shoulders as she went. And that gesture went to his heart, more than any words she had spoken.”
Margaret Mitchell, Gone with the Wind


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