Mark Vogt's Reviews > No Ordinary Time: Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt: The Home Front in World War II

No Ordinary Time by Doris Kearns Goodwin
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Jan 06, 13


This was actually my second reading of this book, having read it originally circa 2000. No Ordinary Time is an easy, enjoyable read for anybody in the Post World War II Generation. In part, the book chronicles the sacrifices of our parents and grandparents on the home front during the Second World War , leaving you with an understanding about the debt of gratitude we owe those remarkable people (not to mention those who actually fought the war). Regardless of your political bent, one instantly recognizes and appreciates the extraordinary leadership of FDR and Churchill -- there probably has been no one like them since. You see them as they were -- not as the stage managed black and white images we see in the old news reels, but the very colorful and imperfect human beings they were. In many ways, they were just like you and me. The book leaves you with enduring lessons for today as well: the danger of appeasement, sometimes war must be waged, when war is necessary fight to win - not to be politically correct, the true greatness of this country for saving the world from itself time and time again. Highly recommended. Someday I'll read it again.
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Mark Vogt An easy, enjoyable read for anybody in the Post World War II Generation. In part, the book chronicles the sacrifices of our parents and grandparents on the home front , leaving you with an understanding about the debt of gratitude we owe those remarkable people (not to mention those who actually fought the war). Regardless of your political bent, one instantly recognizes and appreciates the extraordinary leadership of FDR and Churchill -- there probably has been no one like them since. You see them as they were -- not as the stage managed black and white images we see in the old news reels, but the very colorful and imperfect human beings they were. In many ways, they were just like you and me. The book leaves you with enduring lessons for today as well: the danger of appeasement, sometimes war must be waged, when war is necessary fight to win - not to be politically correct, the true greatness of this country for saving the world from itself time and time again. Highly recommended.


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