Yoli's Reviews > Kafka on the Shore

Kafka on the Shore by Haruki Murakami
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Apr 14, 09



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Quotes Yoli Liked

Haruki Murakami
“Memories warm you up from the inside. But they also tear you apart.”
Haruki Murakami, Kafka on the Shore

Haruki Murakami
“It's like Tolstoy said. Happiness is an allegory, unhappiness a story.”
Haruki Murakami, Kafka on the Shore

Haruki Murakami
“Listen up - there's no war that will end all wars.”
Haruki Murakami, Kafka on the Shore

Haruki Murakami
“Sometimes fate is like a small sandstorm that keeps changing directions. You change direction but the sandstorm chases you. You turn again, but the storm adjusts. Over and over you play this out, like some ominous dance with death just before dawn. Why? Because this storm isn't something that blew in from far away, something that has nothing to do with you. This storm is you. Something inside of you. So all you can do is give in to it, step right inside the storm, closing your eyes and plugging up your ears so the sand doesn't get in, and walk through it, step by step. There's no sun there, no moon, no direction, no sense of time. Just fine white sand swirling up into the sky like pulverized bones. That's the kind of sandstorm you need to imagine.

An you really will have to make it through that violent, metaphysical, symbolic storm. No matter how metaphysical or symbolic it might be, make no mistake about it: it will cut through flesh like a thousand razor blades. People will bleed there, and you will bleed too. Hot, red blood. You'll catch that blood in your hands, your own blood and the blood of others.

And once the storm is over you won't remember how you made it through, how you managed to survive. You won't even be sure, in fact, whether the storm is really over. But one thing is certain. When you come out of the storm you won't be the same person who walked in. That's what this storm's all about.”
Haruki Murakami, Kafka on the Shore

Haruki Murakami
“It's hard to tell the difference between sea and sky, between voyager and sea. Between reality and the workings of the heart.”
Haruki Murakami, Kafka on the Shore

Haruki Murakami
“The sense of tragedy - according to Aristotle - comes, ironically enough, not from the protagonist's weak points but from his good qualities. Do you know what I'm getting at? People are drawn deeper into tragedy not by their defects but by their virtues.
...
[But] we accept irony through a device called metaphor. And through that we grow and become deeper human beings.”
Haruki Murakami, Kafka on the Shore

Haruki Murakami
“What do you think? I'm not a starfish or a pepper tree. I'm a living, breathing human being. Of course I've been in love.”
Haruki Murakami, Kafka on the Shore

Haruki Murakami
“Time weighs down on you like an old, ambiguous dream. You keep on moving, trying to sleep through it. But even if you go to the ends of the earth, you won't be able to escape it. Still, you have to go there- to the edge of the world. There's something you can't do unless you get there.”
Haruki Murakami, Kafka on the Shore

Haruki Murakami
“That's why I like listening to Schubert while I'm driving. Like I said, it's because all his performances are imperfect. A dense, artistic kind of imperfection stimulates your consciousness, keeps you alert. If I listen to some utterly perfect performance of an utterly perfect piece while I'm driving, I might want to close my eyes and die right then and there. But listening to the D major, I can feel the limits of what humans are capable of - that a certain type of perfection can only be realized through a limitless accumulation of the imperfect. And personally I find that encouraging.”
Haruki Murakami, Kafka on the Shore

Haruki Murakami
“The pure present is an ungraspable advance of the past devouring the future. In truth, all sensation is already memory.”
Haruki Murakami, Kafka on the Shore

Haruki Murakami
“Hey, Mr. Nakata. Gramps. Fire! Flood! Earthquake! Revolution! Godzilla's on the loose! Get up!”
Haruki Murakami, Kafka on the Shore

Haruki Murakami
“A strange, terrific force unlike anything I've ever experienced is sprouting in my heart, taking root there, growing. Shut up behind my rib cage, my warm heart expands and contracts independent of my will--over and over.”
Haruki Murakami, Kafka on the Shore

Haruki Murakami
“Narrow minds devoid of imagination. Intolerance, theories cut off from reality, empty terminology, usurped ideals, inflexible systems. Those are the things that really frighten me. What I absolutely fear and loathe.”
Haruki Murakami, Kafka on the Shore

Haruki Murakami
“Chance encounters are what keep us going.”
Haruki Murakami, Kafka on the Shore

Haruki Murakami
“According to Aristophanes in Plato's The Banquet, in the ancient world of legend there were three types of people.
In ancient times people weren't simply male or female, but one of three types : male/male, male/female or female/female. In other words, each person was made out of the components of two people. Everyone was happy with this arrangment and never really gave it much thought. But then God took a knife and cut everyone in half, right down the middle. So after that the world was divided just into male and female, the upshot being that people spend their time running around trying to locate their missing half.”
Haruki Murakami, Kafka on the Shore

Haruki Murakami
“A certain type of perfection can only be realized through a limitless accumulation of the imperfect.”
Haruki Murakami, Kafka on the Shore

Haruki Murakami
“Not just beautiful, though--the stars are like the trees in the forest, alive and breathing. And they're watching me.”
Haruki Murakami, Kafka on the Shore

Haruki Murakami
“Taking crazy things seriously is a serious waste of time.”
Haruki Murakami, Kafka on the Shore

Haruki Murakami
“Lost opportunities, lost possibilities, feelings we can never get back. That's part of what it means to be alive. But inside our heads - at least that's where I imagine it - there's a little room where we store those memories. A room like the stacks in this library. And to understand the workings of our own heart we have to keep on making new reference cards. We have to dust things off every once in awhile, let in fresh air, change the water in the flower vases. In other words, you'll live forever in your own private library.”
Haruki Murakami, Kafka on the Shore

Haruki Murakami
“Being with her I feel a pain, like a frozen knife stuck in my chest. An awful pain, but the funny thing is I'm thankful for it. It's like that frozen pain and my very existence are one.
The pain is an anchor, mooring me here.
Haruki Murakami, Kafka on the Shore

Haruki Murakami
“Adults constantly raise the bar on smart children, precisely because they're able to handle it. The children get overwhelmed by the tasks in front of them and gradually lose the sort of openness and sense of accomplishment they innately have. When they're treated like that, children start to crawl inside a shell and keep everything inside. It takes a lot of time and effort to get them to open up again. Kids' hearts are malleable, but once they gel it's hard to get them back the way they were.”
Haruki Murakami, Kafka on the Shore

Haruki Murakami
“When I open them, most of the books have the smell of an earlier time leaking out between the pages - a special odor of the knowledge and emotions that for ages have been calmly resting between the covers. Breathing it in, I glance through a few pages before returning each book to its shelf.”
Haruki Murakami, Kafka on the Shore

Haruki Murakami
“I'll never see them again. I know that. And they know that. And knowing this, we say farewell.”
Haruki Murakami, Kafka on the Shore

Haruki Murakami
“The pillow smells like the sunlight, a precious smell.”
Haruki Murakami, Kafka on the Shore

Haruki Murakami
“If you remember me, then I don't care if everyone else forgets.”
Haruki Murakami, Kafka on the Shore

Haruki Murakami
“When I wake up, my pillow’s cold and damp with tears. But tears for what? I have no idea.”
Haruki Murakami, Kafka on the Shore


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