Abby's Reviews > The Dancing Girls of Lahore: Selling Love and Saving Dreams in Pakistan's Pleasure District

The Dancing Girls of Lahore by Louise  Brown
Rate this book
Clear rating

by
1931807
's review
May 07, 2009

really liked it
bookshelves: all-time-favorites
Read in May, 2009

it took a long time for this book to get going. the first 50 pages or so were very dry historical information about kanjiri in pakistan, and that was pretty tough to slog through. but once you get past that, the book is amazing. she wrote very objectively, presenting events and stories in a very straightforward way. she only delved into her personal differences with how people were behaving occasionally--and at those times it was necessary. for example, she discussed the inner conflict she felt when a 14 year old girl was sold to a much older sheik (should she interfere and compromise her journalistic objectivity or not?)
overall, a fantastic book. a very eye-opening peek into a culture that most will never get to observe.
flag

Sign into Goodreads to see if any of your friends have read The Dancing Girls of Lahore.
Sign In »

Quotes Abby Liked

“I’m playing catch with Nisha and Nena. They’re standing against the opposite wall shrieking with enjoyment. They’re teenagers, but they’ve never played catch before and lack any sense of coordination; when they throw the ball to me it flies in any direction. Sometimes it hits the wall behind them. We’ve been playing for half an hour and they have only caught it twice.”
Louise Brown, The Dancing Girls of Lahore: Selling Love and Saving Dreams in Pakistan's Pleasure District

“Another of them died last night. His body was in the bazaar this morning. It lay, with a collecting bowl at its feet, on the charpoy that is reserved for those who die without money or family to bury them. He looked desiccated and his skin had the sheen and color of the dates we eat to break our fast. There are new bodies on that charpoy every week. ”
Louise Brown, The Dancing Girls of Lahore: Selling Love and Saving Dreams in Pakistan's Pleasure District

“a raped girl is bad for the family: it shows that they can’t protect their women; that they have little social standing; and that they’re not respectable. It’s worse for the victim because once a woman, or a girl—or a boy—is known as the target of a rape she becomes so despised, so shamed, so worthless that she turns into public property. No one is raped only once.”
Louise Brown, The Dancing Girls of Lahore: Selling Love and Saving Dreams in Pakistan's Pleasure District


Reading Progress

03/29/2009 page 23
6.85%
show 2 hidden updates…

No comments have been added yet.