Black Elephants's Reviews > Mr. Darcy's Daughters

Mr. Darcy's Daughters by Elizabeth Aston
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Feb 17, 09

bookshelves: romance
Read in June, 2007

I don't know which was worse: Pride and Promiscuity: the Lost Sex Scenes of Jane Austen, or Elizabeth Aston's Mr. Darcy's Daughters.

What? Wait! Yes, I must admit, that I'm enough of a Jane Austen fangirl to curiously pick up both. Yet after I read both, it felt as if someone had vomited on my religion. Aston's book seems more heretical however because the book touts her as the student of a great Jane Austen biographer, Lord David Cecil. I now wonder if that name is as fictional and asinine as half of the characters that should have drowned in her plot.

Anyway: THE Pl0t.

Mr. Darcy and his wife have 5 daughters. The first, Letitia, is the most beautifullest. The second, Camilla, is the most smartest with the finest eyes. The twins, Georgina and Belle, are the most wildest with the flirtiest behavior AND have violet eyes, and Alethea, the youngest, loves the music good. Our protagonist is the witty (SHOCKINGLY ABOMINABLE TH4t a women can have the education to be witty?!?!?!) Camilla. She is an enigma in a society that likes giggly, cute women rather than intelligent ones.

I only made it through 50 consecutive pages before I got offended by the vapid characters, the Jane Austen errors, the character murders and overall badness of the novel. One of the worst felonies committed by the author was turning Mr. Darcy into a misogynist. How did this happen? Aston writes that despite giving his daughters an education, he realizes that it's hopeless to expect them to learn anything unless it is a natural inclination. Also, because the tough male persona of their father is absent in the story, the girls go wild and cause scandalous, ludicrous, snooze-worthy things to happen.

I skimmed, and by skimmed, I mean I flipped a hundred pages ahead, read a line, got nauseated then flipped to the end to see who married who. Whatever.

This book relied upon the most gross of author cliches: grandiloquent names, ridiculous plot twists like sodomy and memory loss due to a head wound at Waterloo, cliche themes such as women in Victorian society are repressed and men don't like the ones with the smarts, and boring language.

Aston should have published her bad fan fiction on the Internet in obscurity rather than give it the slightest chance to blight the good name of Jane Austen on the shelf of a bookstore.

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Comments (showing 1-7 of 7) (7 new)

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Paige "Most beautifullist" Really? I wondered at you comprehending this light-reading novel......


Maia B. Pride and Promiscuity was worse. Much worse. On the other hand, Aston is a total crock, too.


Black Elephants Maia wrote: "Pride and Promiscuity was worse. Much worse. On the other hand, Aston is a total crock, too."

And isn't it sad how we Austenphiles still fly toward these books like moths to flames?


Maia B. Yes...true...

Since there's only 6 original books, there's nothing else to do for Austen-ish literature. :(


Jess Have you read Georgette Heyer? I think she is the next best thing to reading one of Jane Austen's. They are so well researched! Try her- her characters are delightful! I'd start with Fredericka.


Black Elephants Jess wrote: "Have you read Georgette Heyer? I think she is the next best thing to reading one of Jane Austen's. They are so well researched! Try her- her characters are delightful! I'd start with Fredericka."

She actually does look very interesting. Thanks for the recommendation!


message 7: by Dorcas (new)

Dorcas wow. Not good. Why do authors do this?? What do Jane Austin fans applaud but clean sweet witty romances? That comment you said where you felt like it had "vomited on your religion". Well said!! I will look elsewhere. My daughter loves Jane Austin and Georgette Heyer and I was hoping for more like it. I will skip this author.


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