Carol. [All cynic, all the time]'s Reviews > Ready Player One

Ready Player One by Ernest Cline
Rate this book
Clear rating

by
3978225
's review
Nov 05, 12

bookshelves: sci-fi, video-game-fantasy, male-lead
Recommended for: Wheaton fans, those who love video game culture, 80s fans
Read from October 26 to November 04, 2012

Very interesting. As a child of the 80s, part of it speaks to me. Then there's the part that loves a great story. It spoke to that part too, but it mostly said, "go away, loser."

Breaking this into two parts--

The story: Disjointed narrative. Like numerous 'coming-of-age' stories, this one has a period where we suddenly go from relatively little skill to relatively great skill. Not that I mind, because in this case, its video game levels. But it was worth noting.


The audio:

One of my first audio books while not engaged in cross-country driving. I have to say I've been enjoying Wil Wheaton's reading--he imparts a lot of emotion to general descriptive text, and modifies his voice nicely when reading dialogue. He does a nice job with the ironic tone, too.

Writing doesn't best correspond with audio--but perhaps it would be worse listening. There's several sections with lists, including 80s movies and tv shows, and the top 10 scorers and their scores. The text chat between him and Artemis was awkward as well, though I could tell Wil was doing his best: "Artemis: blah-blah," "Percival: blah, blah."




I've discovered a couple problems in my listening, and I welcome advice. One, while I can listen while I do things around the house (cook, clean) or physical but not strenuous (walk dogs, rake, bike), after about a hour, my mind starts to wander, and I realize I didn't hear or process anything that was just said. I think I tend to turn it into "background music" after enough time passes.
22 likes · likeflag

Sign into Goodreads to see if any of your friends have read Ready Player One.
sign in »

Comments (showing 1-7 of 7) (7 new)

dateDown_arrow    newest »

Katy Yeah, I have a really hard time with audio books - if I'm driving, my mind wanders; if I'm a passenger in a car, I fall asleep. My best bet while listening to an audio book is to do something fairly mindless, like Majjohng Solitaire or put together a puzzle, so that my mind stays focused on what I'm listening to without that tendency to drift away into other thoughts. This is not a book I would recommend in any case for audio listening, even with the awesome Wil Wheaton - it's just too much a physical thing, somehow. I need to replace my copy and I'll definitely want a physical book for this one.


Carol. [All cynic, all the time] Ah, I'm finding the same thing, Katy. Which kind of defeats the purpose of listening while I'm doing other stuff. It does work well for dog walks. I can't listen for more than an hour without starting to wander... must be years of one-hour lectures showing :)


Katy Carol wrote: "Ah, I'm finding the same thing, Katy. Which kind of defeats the purpose of listening while I'm doing other stuff. It does work well for dog walks. I can't listen for more than an hour without start..."

My mom told me once that when she first developed diabetes, doctors were still recommending that women take up smoking to help them keep from eating too much, but she found that when she smoked she could not do anything else, so she didn't take it up seriously. A weird thought that occurred to me ... heh.

I prefer reading books at this point, so very rarely get audio books. I hope that I don't end up losing my vision, 'cause I'd have a very hard time with only being able to "hear" books, which isn't the same experience at all...


Carol. [All cynic, all the time] I used to be afraid of losing my vision, because a couple decades ago, the only books on tape were 'classics' or a few best-sellers, and I do love my fantasy and sci-fi. At least the huge surge in readers and audio books have meant more have made it to tape, with actual casting/acting and more interesting titles.


Katy Carol wrote: "I used to be afraid of losing my vision, because a couple decades ago, the only books on tape were 'classics' or a few best-sellers, and I do love my fantasy and sci-fi. At least the huge surge in ..."

I know, I live in fear of it, too - I am at risk for retinal detachment, so there's always a chance at any given time I'll lose some or all of my vision. It's something I've always feared. I guess us avid readers have a special fear of this, huh? It's true that it's nice there are so many more options now with audio books, that's for sure!


Jack Maybe I'm weird, but I listen to audiobooks lying down in the dark. I find I then don't have to expend any effort, just watch the story play out in my mind.

You have me beat with your hour. For me, after thirty seconds to a minute I have to rewind, often past where I'd started. I think the idea that audiobooks allow multitasking may be why some people don't think they like them. For me, it's like reading a book: I'm not doing anything else, except maybe walking (which for me is still difficult unless I'm on a treadmill because other people sap my attention).


Carol. [All cynic, all the time] Interesting. I think I'm too impatient to read that slow.


back to top