Peter Prasad's Reviews > A Floating Life

A Floating Life by Tad Crawford
Rate this book
Clear rating

by
12976613
's review
Oct 26, 12

bookshelves: new-reviews
Recommended to Peter by: friend of the author
Recommended for: men & thinkers
Read from October 17 to 18, 2012, read count: 1

Huzzah Tad Crawford! If a series of Hieronymus Bosh paintings were turned into a novel, you might have half of what Tad Crawford has constructed in A Floating Life. The other half of this elegant novel touches on nautical exploration, self-sacrifice and service to others. Like a cork, we bounce through an examination of cultures, values and experiences that tug at the fabric of our imagination. Are these dreams? Serial portraits? Who cares – just jump in.

Expect your emotions to be stretched with Alice In Wonderland-like dialogs that dance with innuendo through a job interview, a marriage break-up, the emotional collapse of love into economic survival, the dark night of crossing the River Styx and Japanese ritual suicide. Sexuality, impotence, and role reversal are explored, even how a man can nurse a newborn baby. We savor dialog with divinity herself, a ruby earth mother named Numun.

If Jung was exploring a super consciousness, Crawford is not far behind. We are people adrift in cocktail party banter, paralleled by a survivalist drifting on a raft through storm-tossed seas. I was reminded of Hesse’s Steppenwolf and Mann’s Death in Venice, yet Crawford’s global appetite includes Taoist practice and tantric Buddhist realization. In this world, art seeps from the constrictions of convention and the rigidity of form into a font of healing that ripens the reader’s soul. Five stars.
Likeflag

Sign into Goodreads to see if any of your friends have read A Floating Life.
Sign In »

Comments (showing 1-1 of 1) (1 new)

dateDown arrow    newest »

Peter Prasad A FLOATING LIFE by Tad Crawford

If a series of Hieronymus Bosh paintings were turned into novel, you might have half of what Tad Crawford has constructed in A Floating Life. The other half of this elegant novel touches on nautical exploration, self-sacrifice and service to others. Like a cork, we bounce through an examination of cultures, values and experiences that tug at the fabric of our imagination. Are these dreams? Serial portraits? Who cares – just jump in.

Expect your emotions to be stretched with Alice In Wonderland-like dialogs that dance with innuendo through a job interview, a marriage break-up, the emotional collapse of love into economic survival, the dark night of crossing the River Styx and Japanese ritual suicide. Sexuality, impotence, and role reversal are explored, even how a man can nurse a newborn baby. We savor dialog with divinity herself, a ruby earth mother named Numun.

If Jung was exploring a super consciousness, Crawford is not far behind. We are people adrift in cocktail party banter, paralleled by a survivalist drifting on a raft through storm-tossed seas. I was reminded of Hesse’s Steppenwolf and Mann’s Death in Venice, yet Crawford’s global appetite includes Taoist practice and tantric Buddhist realization. In this world, art seeps from the constrictions of convention and the rigidity of form into a font of healing that ripens the reader’s soul. Five stars.


back to top