Margaret's Reviews > Glenarvon

Glenarvon by Caroline Lamb
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Jan 16, 09

bookshelves: british-literature, authors-kl
Read in January, 2009, read count: 1

Oh, how I longed for some coherency of plot or character to pull this together. There are intriguing pieces -- a plot to murder a ducal heir, the Irish revolution of the late 1700s, disturbing obsessive love, the fictional portrayals of Byron, Lady Melbourne, Lamb herself, and other prominent figures -- but they're only pieces, and only held my attention sporadically. Oh, well, I wasn't expecting it to be good: I just wanted it to be better.
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Comments (showing 1-8 of 8) (8 new)

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message 1: by Moira (new) - added it

Moira Russell Aww, sigh. I know it can't be any good. But some of it looks delicious!


Margaret It was worth reading for the juicy bits, but so dull in spots!


message 3: by Moira (new) - added it

Moira Russell Margaret wrote: "It was worth reading for the juicy bits, but so dull in spots!"

Aww, poor Caro. She really reminds me of the uneducated genius women Woolf writes about who just kind of grow all over the place, like unpruned roses.


Margaret "Unpruned roses" is a wonderful way of putting it, because yeah, with a little...direction (I don't want to say training, which is the rose word), she could have been so amazing.


message 5: by Moira (new) - added it

Moira Russell Margaret wrote: ""Unpruned roses" is a wonderful way of putting it, because yeah, with a little...direction (I don't want to say training, which is the rose word), she could have been so amazing."

Just a little! I mean, I was reading about the Brontes again (ha, they're like my hobby) and the spell in Brussels with Heger was really so important for Charlotte and Emily - not so much that they got taught by a paternalistic man blahblah but here was someone who obviously believed in their great gifts and gave them something to push against, if that makes sense. Resistance.


Margaret That does make sense, because I think one of the things Caro lacked was someone who believed in her gifts and was willing to do the Heger thing and try to teach her. Paternalistic, definitely, but at least he believed they had something to offer, which I don't know that anybody ever thought of Caro.


message 7: by Moira (new) - added it

Moira Russell Yeah....other than the ability to get married and have an heir and maybe host parties. Poor Caro.


message 8: by Moira (new) - added it

Moira Russell -- And you know, you would think of all people BYRON might have done that, but apparently he was too obsessed with dressing her up as a boy, or whatever....I was going to say I don't think he expected women to be intellectual, but then there was Mary Shelley, whom he did respect, and even Annabella (altho he didn't respect her), and he liked talking to Augusta. But Caro was so gifted -- and she wrote back to him! She actually tried to rewrite Don Juan! She put him in a book, and unlike with Polidori, he couldn't just laugh it off. She was just so fearless.


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