Jeanette 's Reviews > Cold Light

Cold Light by Jenn Ashworth
Rate this book
Clear rating

by
796425
's review
Sep 28, 12

bookshelves: all-fiction, europe-and-british-isles, young-adult-books
Read in September, 2012

3.5 stars. Maybe.
This one smells like teen spirit. I'm okay with that, but I'm becoming increasingly irritated with book marketing schemes that mislead readers by not tagging a book as a young adult selection. Not that it's unsuitable for adults. It's well written and the plot is intriguing, but it's heavy on the teen hangout scene, with kids trying to be cool and ganging up on the weak.

This is a story that starts off dark and becomes darker and darker still. It made me glad I don't have children, because it relies on realistic scenarios for its creepiness. If I had a teenage daughter, I'd have chained her to the bed frame by her chastity belt after reading this story. It revolves around a precocious and manipulative fourteen-year-old girl, shoplifting, pedophilia, lots of underage drinking and smoking, and deaths under suspicious circumstances. Chloe made me think of William March's The Bad Seed.

I may write more later if the hand will cooperate...
13 likes · likeflag

Sign into Goodreads to see if any of your friends have read Cold Light.
sign in »

Comments (showing 1-14 of 14) (14 new)

dateDown_arrow    newest »

message 1: by Jason (new)

Jason How is your hand doing these days? The same?


Jeanette It keeps getting hideouser and hideouser to look at, but there's a lot less cramping since I stopped doing what the experts advised. What do they know? It's not their hand. It becomes painful and clumsy if I type too much in one day. The Good Reads typing police are going to come after me.


message 3: by Jason (new)

Jason There should be a mechanism to yell at you if you type too much in one day. :)


Jeanette Electroshock. Yeah. That'd work.


message 5: by Caroline (new)

Caroline Urrrrrrrrrrgh, this does not sound my cup of tea!

Sorry about the hand.....

I was reading an article the other day where Terry Pratchett was saying how his life had been revolutionized by one of these speak-to-your-computer programmes. I know they cost money, & probably they are a hassle to set up, but they really sound the business if you have problems typing.


Jeanette I'm working on a more thorough review, but this is definitely not a book for you, dear.

I have looked into the voice recognition software set-up, and it does cost more than my budget will allow right now. It's not super expensive, but I'm on very short rations.


message 7: by sckenda (new)

sckenda Jeanette wrote: "It keeps getting hideouser and hideouser to look at, but there's a lot less cramping since I stopped doing what the experts advised. What do they know? It's not their hand. It becomes painful and ..."

I have a mangled left hand. I can sympathize. Typing is very difficult and time consuming. Therefore, I always forgive the typos of others--not that you have any.


message 8: by John (new) - added it

John It's funny, sometimes I'll read a review of a novel or film and while the reviewer did not like the work he or she will say something that makes me intrigued. This is a good example of that. I totally get being irritated by cross platform marketing (was this "shelved" as an adult book - either in a bookstore or virtually?) I'm finding that many YA novels have more complex plotting (albeit with simpler language) than commercial fiction written for adults. Plus I think it's almost impossible for a YA book to be too dark given what a dark period the teen years can be for many. Personally I only left my angsty brooding stuff behind, like, four months ago. I've put this Cold Light on my "to read" shelf." Thanks. :)


Jeanette Steve, I'm an obsessive proofreader, otherwise my reviews would be an unreadable mess.

John wrote: "It's funny, sometimes I'll read a review of a novel or film and while the reviewer did not like the work he or she will say something that makes me intrigued. This is a good example of that. I tota..."

John, I wouldn't say I didn't like it. Three stars on GR means "I liked it," and I might even call it 3.5 stars. It's just that I like to be told the truth about a novel that should really be YA. It seems like the past few years publishers have marketed YA-type books as adult fare just so they can sell more books.

This one is definitely a more complex plot than a lot of adult novels, and the language is not at all simple. I just grew bored after awhile with all the "I was a loser, and then Chloe became my best friend, and then Emma came along and ruined everything," and all that other teenager-y stuff. It's the kind of thing I would have liked as a teen, when I was going through similar experiences.

Anyway, I hope you enjoy it. Sounds like you'll relate well to the angsty stuff.


message 10: by Kelly (last edited Oct 02, 2012 07:07PM) (new)

Kelly  Maybedog I'm sorry about your hand. That sounds awful.

These characters sound like my kids. :( (foster kids)


Jeanette Kelly - Maybedog wrote: "These characters sound like my kids. :( (foster kids)"

Don't let your foster girls near this book. It could lead to new avenues of delinquency.


message 12: by Mikki (new)

Mikki Love The Bad Seed -- she was just so wonderfully horrid! I don't understand this trend toward uber-dark in current YA novels, it seems excessive to me.


Jeanette Did you read the book of The Bad Seed, Mikki, or just watch the movie?
This one is technically not YA, but I know what you mean about all the darkest depths in current YA fiction. I don't think I would have even liked that when I was a teen. The only author I liked in that genre as a YA was Stephen King.


message 14: by Kelly (last edited Oct 10, 2012 12:20AM) (new)

Kelly  Maybedog Me too. Wait, I lie. I loved Flowers in the Attic, When the Cradle Will Rock, and Lord of the flies. But I'm pretty sure I wouldn't have liked this stuff.


back to top