Trish's Reviews > NW

NW by Zadie Smith
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Sep 16, 2012

really liked it
bookshelves: audio, british, fiction, literature
Read from September 16 to 20, 2012

Author Smith says NW is about language, and I agree. Language is central to our understanding of the characters, and language defines their lives in many ways. I had the good fortune to listen to the audio of this title, brilliantly read by Karen Bryson and Don Gilet. Having access to a paper copy at the same time, I feel confident that the spoken version is an aid to clarity and understanding, and there was true enjoyment in hearing the range of vocal virtuosity by both readers. I did end up listening to it twice.

A clear example of how language can define one is the incident of a boneheaded young man with the posh accent, Tom, selling an old MG to the young man Felix, who had made great strides towards self-realization despite the tug of his background and the brake of his language. Any observer of that scene would immediately suspect Felix of putting the fix on when objectively that would be far from the case. And Keisha, or Natalie as she began calling herself, managed to change most things about her world when she changed her language. She became a barrister and even forgot what it was like to be poor.

But this novel is also about the process of becoming. To my way of thinking, there are only two central characters in the novel, Leah and Natalie. Both resist adulthood, but the choice is not really theirs to make. They become adults despite their attempts to hold back the process, and end up making decisions that demonstrate authorial control over their own lives, stopping their ears to very loud protestations from their inner selves. Therefore they land in adulthood awkwardly, splay-legged and wrong-footed, and must find a way to right themselves again before acknowledging they are older, wiser, and already there.

Several other minor characters, e.g., Annie and Nathan, manage to avoid true adulthood altogether by burying their options beneath addictions. Felix was the one that was most consciously “becoming.” He strove daily to be a better man--for his woman, for himself, for his future family. He made himself happy doing it. He got clean, “was conscious,” and made himself and his family proud. But demons chased him down. Maybe you can’t really ever get free.

In the last third of the book, a 50-something female barrister “role model” dressed in a gold satin shirt beneath the expected blazer, and a diamante trim to de rigueur black court shoes tells Natalie: '“Turn yourself down. One notch. Two. Because this is not neutral.” She passed a hand over her neat frame from her head to her lap, like a scanner. “This is never neutral.”'

Of course I’d heard of Zadie Smith, but I’d never read her early work. She was so popular when she first came into print that I decided to wait to form my own opinion when the clamour died down. Sometimes it is so noisy out there when a new, talented author is heralded that I can’t hear myself think.

I never had the feeling while reading this novel that Smith was haphazard in her choice of images or language. The novel is constructed and in the end one looks up to see graffiti covering a wall with violent scribbles of bright color. Overlaid, a couple words traced in black paint stand out over the rest: SEX RACE CLASS
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Reading Progress

09/17 page 170
59.0% "Lots going on."
03/14 marked as: read

Comments (showing 1-5 of 5) (5 new)

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Seana "I am the sole author of the dictionary that defines me." Great line, and you helped me see how it relates to the book as a whole. I really enjoyed your take on this. It is such a rich book that there's room for many many kinds of commentary on it.


Trish You're right--there is much to talk about here. It is big and something like life: sometimes it is difficult to pick out the theme running through it amidst the noise of activity in the novel. I listened to it twice and had access to a paper copy, so the second listen allowed me to hear moments of revelation. But I'm sure there is more, much more.


Seana Trish, you may enjoy this essay by Joyce Carol Oates from none other than our friends at NYRB.


Trish Seana wrote: "Trish, you may enjoy this essay by Joyce Carol Oates from none other than our friends at NYRB."

Wow. Thanks for that, Seana. Now that is a review. Glad to see she picked out my quotes & notes, but she seemed to actually get it...I have never read Joyce's Ulysses, but I will have a look at it now.


Seana Definitely give it a try. It helps to have a commentary.


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