Ian's Reviews > The Shining

The Shining by Stephen King
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Jan 08, 2009

it was ok
bookshelves: fiction, own
Read in January, 2009

This book sucked. The ideas and themes were interesting sometimes, but the writing was awful. Let me give one short example.

"Whimpering with fear, she began to pull herself upwards again. Ten steps, a dozen, a baker's dozen."

Let me ask you, what the hell do a dozen and a baker's dozen have to do with stairs? Stephen King seems to be full of these little things, call them puns or quirks or flaws, they're everywhere, and they're totally stupid and distract from what otherwise might be passably interesting writing.

Also, he puts parentheses in the middle of sentences explaining things that are obvious already. He does this constantly, sometimes up to five times a page.

Other examples include Wendy being "Afraid he would pop up like a jack-in-the-box—pun intended." Why in god's name would Wendy be making puns?

Another gem: "A nightmare flood of thoughts flooding through his mind in a split second."

The action was good enough and easy enough to make me keep reading, but I found myself groaning more often in annoyance than fear.
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Reading Progress

12/30/2008 page 50
9.9%
01/07/2009 page 450
89.11% 1 comment
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Comments (showing 1-19 of 19) (19 new)

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Marco I agree his writing was not at its best, but he was also addicted to coke and alcohol at the time. So considering that...


Sherry I also don't think you are aware of his 'tongue in cheek' writing. This is found in almost all his writings.


Alexa How could you say this? He is writing as Wendy during most of these instances, who is freaked out of her mind. She is obviously not going to be the most coherent. And Stephen King is the most amazing author that I have ever had the pleasure of reading.


message 4: by Peter (last edited Oct 18, 2010 01:42PM) (new) - rated it 3 stars

Peter Roberts A bakers dozen means 13 so in this case 13 steps though I agree i don't like his writing style In this


Joshua Nomen-Mutatio Alexa wrote: "How could you say this? He is writing as Wendy during most of these instances, who is freaked out of her mind. She is obviously not going to be the most coherent."

Do people commonly make puns when they're terrified?


Heather Hmm.. I really love the informal type of style King uses. As far as the parentheses go, they add to the whole connectedness of the story...how everything is important and has meaning. And really, have you noticed how many allusions and inspirations are in his writing? Its amazing- music, poems, stories, the Red Death holds sway over all! It's rather brilliant.


Monnie Actually I love how Stephen King does this. If you were inside my head all kinds of random sayings and quirky things would pop up. I love how he really seems to be in the internal world of the character.


Chris I know, in the version I'm reading especially, the parentheses are used to differentiate thought from speech and narration. Because Danny has the Shining, those parentheses are the glimpse into his world and how he sees/hears things.


D.R. Great book overall. The ending like most King endings lacked something. . . maybe steam. The lady in the room spooked me, both the book and movie versions. Enjoyed it enough to read again twenty years later.


Daniel Whittaker they're called f*****g metaphors!


message 11: by [deleted user] (new)

ok well the first quote was actually genius, the parentheses are when the characters are 'shining' as in the name of the book, and rest i dont even remember and im almost done with the book


message 12: by [deleted user] (new)

im finished now and second quote is taken out of context. you made it sound it like 'afraid he would pop up like a jack-in-the-box-- PUN INTENDED.' when in fact it was more like 'afraid he would pop up like some evil jack-in-the-box, pun intended, and take her life by surprise' or whatever it was. jesus man


message 13: by Josh (new) - rated it 2 stars

Josh I understand what you're saying. I have laughed at them which sometimes convinces me that I have a sick sense of humor. He also does this a lot in "Needful Things".


Magic That is Stephen King for you. Wierd humor and strange, obvious explanations. But that is what makes him so awsome.


message 15: by Rachelhindle (new)

Rachelhindle SK is a writer in a class of his own!

www.psychicreadingrooms.com


Carlos Its called style. A metaphor. Good writing. Probably words you haven't heard if you're off shamming a book that is great. You probably don't know what good writing is because just from looking at your horrible review (sucks, isn't that veeery descriptive?), you seem from the type of person that thinks Harry Potter is award winning writing.


Carlos Its called style. A metaphor. Good writing. Probably words you haven't heard if you're off shamming a book that is great. You probably don't know what good writing is because just from looking at your horrible review (sucks, isn't that veeery descriptive?), you seem from the type of person that thinks Harry Potter is award winning writing.


Janet Jay Yeah, a dozen and bakers dozen are just numbers, not jokes or puns or whatever you think he thought they were...


Janet Jay Yeah, a dozen and bakers dozen are just numbers, not jokes or puns or whatever you think he thought they were...


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