Lightreads's Reviews > Iron Kissed

Iron Kissed by Patricia Briggs
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Dec 29, 2008

did not like it
bookshelves: fiction, urban-fantasy, romance, fantasy
Read in August, 2008

** spoiler alert ** Oh my God, you guys. Stop the presses! I have figured it out. The sudden, shocking explosion of paranormal romantical urban fantasy written in the first-person on a plucky, mouthy heroin? You wondered why, and now I know.

It's not the blood-tingling appeal of a sexy vampire. Oh no no no. It's much better than that. I mean, this is 2008, for God's sake. We're, like, post feminist, okay? We want books about plucky, smart-mouthed heroins who every man [vampire, werewolf, police officer [delete as applicable]] inexplicably falls in love with. But we really don't want to get carried away, right? Don't want to ruin a good thing. Which is why this whole paranormal romantical first-person fantasy thing is awesome – your [vampire, werewolf, alpha of the pack [[delete as applicable]] can be the overbearing, obnoxious, belittling asshole of yore, but it's all right, he can't help it, it's the nature of being a [vampire, werewolf, alpha of the pack [[delete as applicable]]. You have the awesome hotness of a disrespectful, dominating love interest, and none of that nasty guilt! Even when our heroin is raped and spends the rest of the book angsting about how this means the pack won't respect her boyfriend anymore! Win!
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Comments (showing 1-9 of 9) (9 new)

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message 1: by Jan (new)

Jan Time to add spell check. Kept looking for the drugs--or maybe it's new slang???



message 2: by Deb (new) - rated it 4 stars

Deb Rainey We are all attracted to Heroes and that's what Mercy is. I don't think that it would be unusual that there would be a lot of men attracted to her. Sure, as in any book we all enjoy the fantasy of walking in an interesting character's shoes. As far as Adam being a jerk--I don't see it. He relied on Mercy to help him out in the previous book, he understands her reluctance to be dominated and has done his best not to do so at some cost to himself.


 Kendall [Kenny] *chuckles* That was a very amusing review.


Kelly H. (Maybedog) You are my hero. It's like we're looking at the emerald city and we're the only ones without the green glasses on. How can people not see that this is rape? That this is the typical old sexism/co-dependent/controlling and abusive situation and so much UF is like this. It's infuriating.


Lindsay Simms Okay, I really need to comment on the last part. If that's all you got out of Mercy's reaction to her rape, then you need to read it again. Her reaction, and Ben's explanation, was spot on for a survivor immediately following a rape. She worried about that (for all of half a sentence), because that's all she could comprehend at the moment. The most horrible thing possible had happened to her, and she sure as hell couldn't process it, especially still drugged up on fairy potion. She blamed herself. She thought it was her fault and that she had to pay for what she had done. She hated herself and worried (again, for all of half a sentence) what the consequences would be for those around her. Unless you have personally been through it, you cannot imagine the self-loathing and hatred that comes from being raped, and I honestly hope that it's something you never experience.

Her reaction was the most genuine and realistic response I have ever read, and I implore you to think before mocking it. Feel free to insult the rest of the book, that's your right, but please leave this part alone. It happens to too many people to be so cavalierly ridiculed. Mercy, and through her, the billions of survivors of sexual assault currently living, deserve our respect and our compassion.


Tanell Donnell I have to agree with you, Lindsay. As a survivor myself, I related very much to Mercy's reaction and in the 4th installment, her healing process. Especially in cases of coercion rather than force, a victim will blame themselves. Many worry they will inconvenience or harm their loved ones if they speak out. Briggs handled this in a way someone who has never been through it cannot understand. I can't applaud her enough.


Lindsay Simms Coersion while the person isn't sober spawns some of the worst masochism and victim blaming that I've ever seen. It sickens me.

I hope that you're further along in your recovery process. If you need to talk, feel free to message me. That goes for anybody who sees this post.


Lindsay Simms Coersion while the person isn't sober spawns some of the worst masochism and victim blaming that I've ever seen. It sickens me.

I hope that you're further along in your recovery process. If you need to talk, feel free to message me. That goes for anybody who sees this post.


Jess Tannel and Lindsay, I thought it was a good, accurate representation, too. Briggs wrote this stuff well: to me it felt respectful and authentic, not contrived, not victim-blaming, not anti-feminist, not angst-driven. Mercy blamed herself because that's something survivors do.


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