Misty's Reviews > Fathomless

Fathomless by Jackson Pearce
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4.75ish.

This was one of my more highly anticipated books of last year (because hello? Fairy tale freak. This is not news to anyone.), and it's sort of shameful that I am just now posting a written review. (Though yes, I did have a mini vlogged one here. But still.) I feel like I've talked about this book a lot, but nothing's all official-like until I write about it. So.

This was my favorite Jackson Pearce book to date. I've enjoyed everything I've read by her, but there's always been something a teensy bit off for me, especially in her endings. As short as her books are, they seem to lose steam a bit at the end, which is disappointing on its own, of course, but more so considering how much I enjoy them up to the steam-loss. But while Fathomless isn't perfect by any means, its come the closest to being exactly what I wanted from it. It has this really good dark streak that is perfectly suited to both the original tale and to the world Pearce has set up in her retellings series. There's this quality of a car crash in remarkably slow motion, a great sense of foreboding over the whole story, that creates excellent tension, and Pearce uses that to get at the unhappiness and emptiness at the core of The Little Mermaid - and is it weird to say I was so very happy to see that? This aspect is one of the things I potentially love most about a fairy tale retelling (especially one as dark as TLM(1)), but it's also often one of the most disappointing and neglected aspects. Modern audiences are so out of touch with original fairy tales that retellings that make use of the actual endings and tones are considered novel and creative, rather than traditional. We've been Disneyfied, and I'm on a tangent, so I'm going to rein myself in and just wrap that up by saying, I love it when a retelling is more traditionally bleak(2)... Fortunately Pearce capitalizes on it, to which I say THANK GOD. This is what I wanted from a TLM retelling. It's a little off. It's a little disturbing. Perfect.

A big part of what makes this work is the characters. The sisters and the romance are means to an end, but the "3" main characters (one of them being a 2-in-1 deal...) are what make this story what it is. How they interact with/react to each other and their colliding worlds, and how they use each other to make sense of their lives - and in a desperate attempt to break away from the things holding them back - is what gives this story that car-crash feeling. It's impossible for them to all get what they want, to all have their HEA(3), but you're made to care for each of them, damaged as they are. And so you know pain is coming, and it's simply a matter of degrees... It leaves you a little conflicted(4) because you both see flaws and feel sympathy for each of them, which makes things excellently ambiguous. Add to this an overall dark tone and sort of desperate, lonely, magical atmosphere with not all of the loose ends tied up, and you've got a book nicely calculated to make for Happy Mistys.(5)

This complements the rest of the series very well, but can also be read completely as a standalone, which is excellent  for readers wanting who've been wanting to pick these up, or even just Fathomless specifically, but weren't sure about making a series committment. Though all of the stories are linked, and they will expand the readers understanding of the rest, they work perfectly as potential companion novels to be read on their own. You don't have to feel tied down by them, or obligated to read them (to know what's going on or to have closure), which is something I really like from a series of this type. So if you've liked Pearce in the past or have been wanting to give her a try, I think you can't really go wrong with Fathomless.


1. Originally, of course. I love me some Alyssa Milano-Ariel as much as the next 80s kid, but in case you didn't know, Disney changed the story a whole lot. Like, it's actually a real bummer...
2. Ok, nothing's going to keep me from sounding weird, so whatever. I like the sad, tortured feels.†

3. Happily Ever After.
4. Unless you don't root for non-humans, maybe?  I'm not always Team Human.
5. 1 out of 1 Mistys agree.
† What's this? A note within a note? Yeah, I only like those feels in fairy tales. Add 'em to some YA PNR and I might have to cut you.
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Comments (showing 1-9 of 9) (9 new)

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Phil like it? hate it? j pearce is awesome, and Ive had this book for like 2 months now but I don't want the series to be over so ive been putting off reading it


Misty So far, I'm REALLY liking it. I loved Sweetly in the beginning (haven't read SR), but felt it was weak in the end, so hopefully this doesn't suffer the same fate, but yeah, really liking it.

And I do the same thing w/ series. I have had Monsters of Men since before the UK released (which was a good 4 months or so before the US release) and I STILL have not read it. I just. CAN'T.


Phil Yea I think Sweetly had its weak points, but I still really liked it. Sisters Red, for me at least, was the worse of the two, I mean I liked it but not as much as Sweetly. So Im just scared that this book could go either way.


message 4: by Lulufrances (new)

Lulufrances Loved this review!! :)


Misty Thanks! =)


JG (The Introverted Reader) I was a little disappointed in Sisters Red, so I've bravely resisted the gorgeous covers. You've convinced me to give her another go.


Misty Each book I've read by her I've liked more, though I have yet to read Sisters Red, so I can't say how the two compare. Hopefully you won't be disappointed. =)


Tessa I just finished this. The ending is what made it for me. I loved how Pearce handled the Nadia/Lo dual personality.


Misty Tessa wrote: "I just finished this. The ending is what made it for me. I loved how Pearce handled the Nadia/Lo dual personality."

Yes! That's absolutely my favorite thing.


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