Kim's Reviews > V for Vendetta

V for Vendetta by Alan Moore
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Ugh.

So I read this book because people seem to think it is this great political tome and V is this great revolutionary character. I couldn't disagree more:

1. This graphic novel is deeply sexist. The main female character is weak, spineless and insipid, drawn in this awful vaguely tarty style, and used as less an actual character, and more as a plot point. V saves her from being raped and murdered - and I could get into a diatribe here about how much I dislike sexual violence being used for entertainment, but I'll save it for a later point - only to be tortured into seeing things his way and working with him, which brings me to...

2. V is for Vendetta people, not anarchist revolution. The character is driven by rage and a desire for personal revenge, not a free society. Also, the political rantings are vague, shallow, boring, and, um, sort of senseless ranting. Also, getting back to the sexism, the character breaks up with justice because SHE is a WHORE, he seriously says this, and decides to get it on with anarchy. First of all, revolution without justice, hello different totalitarian state. Second, fuck you Alan Moore, really, we're sexualizing the rev now? Never forget ladies, who you fuck is more important than who you are or what you think.

3. Poorly drawn. A lot of the art was hard to follow, which sort of defeats the purpose of the pictures telling a story in a graphic novel.

4. Rape is not entertainment. It's not funny, it's not sexy. There are other ways to establish bad characters and fucked up social structures.

5. Mostly though, I stopped reading it because I got bored. I didn't find any of the characters to be that interesting or well developed and I wasn't terribly interested in the storyline, so I quit.
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Comments (showing 1-9 of 9) (9 new)

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Staffan Höstman Couldn't agree more.


Mari LOL. So no great literary work is sexist, or racist or politically incorrect? Is that what you think?


message 3: by Kim (new) - rated it 1 star

Kim Oh please, V for Vendetta is further from a great literary work than Pluto is from the sun.

And yeah, I do think that "great literary works" lose marks when they are deeply misogynist or racist. Or, phrased a different way, I don't think that racism and/or sexism in a literary work should be excused or ignored because the author can turn a phrase.


Mike Marsbergen You don't have to be misogynistic or racist to write about those themes.


Lina I didn't find it to be sexist at all. If anything, the society is sexist and the women we see are quite strong for managing their way through it. We have Helen, the manipulative wife, we have Rosemary, the bullied woman who loses all hope in anything, and we have Evey, who starts out as a sixteen year old girl and manages to grow into a strong and confident woman with a goal AND principles the reader can agree on. Like, "don't kill".

That he called Justice a whore is something I really can't see as connected to his views on women(Especially since V himself sang about the ways in which widows were mistreated, for example, when singing about This Vicious Cabaret). Justice betrayed him with Cruelty, which for him was the opposite of her, so basically he's calling her out for throwing away his principles which he projected unto her.
Sure the way in which he talks to her may seem sexist, but I'd rather focus on the fact that he talks to a statue and can hardly count as sane.

Though I can see how you reached the conclusion of Evey being weak when you didn't finish the comic. Personally, I saw her as unbelievably strong after V's death - she carried on in his memory, but with her principles. She's quite a person of integrity, I'd say.


Jacob Levenson You are a moron


message 7: by Dan (new) - rated it 2 stars

Dan Well put, Kim.


message 8: by Denver-Rose (new) - added it

Denver-Rose Harmon I have to agree with your criticism of it being sexist. But it was written in the late '80s. That doesn't excuse it of course, but if I avoided everything that irked my Feminist sensibilities, if never ever enjoy anything! But yes, the move and the novel leave me thinking "what about women?" They're just there to help the plot, and although I like Evey, she is not a source of power for women to draw inspiration from by any means. Other than that, I love the book.


message 9: by Denver-Rose (new) - added it

Denver-Rose Harmon I have to agree with your criticism of it being sexist. But it was written in the late '80s. That doesn't excuse it of course, but if I avoided everything that irked my Feminist sensibilities, if never ever enjoy anything! But yes, the move and the novel leave me thinking "what about women?" They're just there to help the plot, and although I like Evey, she is not a source of power for women to draw inspiration from by any means. Other than that, I love the book.


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