Miriam's Reviews > Zero Summer

Zero Summer by Andrew Demcak
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Dec 07, 08

bookshelves: poetry, unfinished
Recommended for: Pretentious creative writing students
Read in December, 2008

In a 78-page collection, it should not take 15 pages to get to the first poem. I only read the first four poems. They were pretentious, negative, and sex/genitalia obsessed. Very disappointing, given the greater degree of innovation and depth of thought demonstrated by Demcak in his previous publication, Catching Tigers in Red Weather.
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Comments (showing 1-3 of 3) (3 new)

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message 1: by Peter (last edited Dec 10, 2008 06:19PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Peter Lest we not forget those reviewers too, who, generally, and one hates to use the term “shut-ins,” so let’s say the more sedentary reviewer with no real-life experiences to draw upon. One would think that manners and etiquette would dictate that they ignore that which displeases them, but instead their ravenous egos compel them to leave their petty criticisms and negative reviews (which are both ill-informed and irrelevant) anywhere they can.


message 2: by [deleted user] (last edited Dec 13, 2008 09:41AM) (new)

Then there are reviewers in general who dislike all that is not their own work. Those who are limited in experience to, "I walked into the woods. / I saw a flower." And those, who by sheer absence of information about differences, will fancy one poet's use of the exotic, while condemning another whose life they simply do not understand, and ironically would understand better if they would read onward. This writer smells something bad in some reviewers' motivations as though pretension itself directs them to indict others as pretentious.




message 3: by Sophia (last edited Dec 13, 2008 04:42PM) (new)

Sophia Fans of any author, in general, will react to any review which is clearly confrontational and mean-spirited; any review which is so obviously sneering at an author and an author’s audience. Reviews which make sweeping generalizations or contain obvious prejudices warrant this response, as well. Ironically, these negative reviews most times have the completely opposite effect on potential fans of a work of literature- they create more buzz and more publicity, much to the chagrin of said review’s writer’s negative intentions.


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