Jeffrey Keeten's Reviews > The Shining

The Shining by Stephen King
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Jun 22, 15

bookshelves: horror
Read from August 16 to 19, 2012

** spoiler alert ** “The thought rose from nowhere, naked and unadorned. The urge to tumble her out of bed, naked, bewildered, just beginning to wake up; to pounce on her, seize her neck like the green limb of a young aspen and to throttle her, thumbs on windpipe, fingers pressing against the top of her spine, jerking her head up and ramming it back down against the floorboards, again and again, whamming, whacking, smashing, crashing. Jitter and jive, baby. Shake, rattle, and roll. He would make her take her medicine. Every drop. Every last bitter drop.”

For a guy like myself who loves to read and write taking the job as a winter caretaker of The Overlook Hotel sounds like a dream job.

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The Stanley Hotel inspiration for The Overlook Hotel

The time requirements for the job are miniscule leaving me plenty of time every day to work on the next “great American novel”. Before leaving for this foray into isolationism I would calculate just how many books I would need to sustain me through the winter and then increase it by ⅓ or so. Jack Torrance makes the case that because he is an educated man he is better suited for the job.

“A stupid man is more prone to cabin fever just as he’s more prone to shoot someone over a card game or commit a spur-of-the-moment robbery. He gets bored. When the snow comes, there’s nothing to do but watch TV or play solitaire and cheat when he can’t get all the aces out. Nothing to do but bitch at his wife and nag at the kids and drink. It gets hard to sleep because there’s nothing to hear. So he drinks himself to sleep and wakes up with a hangover. He gets edgy. And maybe the telephone goes out and the TV aerial blows down and there’s nothing to do but think and cheat at solitaire and get edgier and edgier. Finally...boom, boom, boom.”

Now Jack may be an educated man but he is carrying around more baggage than any one bellhop could ever get delivered. He has a double helix of trouble an alcohol problem intertwined with a really nasty temper. He has lost jobs. He has beaten a young man senseless. He has broken his son Danny’s arm, little more than a toddler, because he messed up his papers.

Jack is always sorry.

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Jack playing Jack

When not drinking he wipes his lips so often he makes them bleed.

His father was a violent man and King does give us some background on Jack’s childhood which may have been intended to lend some sympathy for Jack. Just because we follow the threads back to why he is the way he is doesn’t mean that he is anymore likeable or for that matter less dangerous. He may be an educated man, and he may have made the case as to why he is more qualified to be a caretaker cut off from the world, but as it turns out he wasn’t suited for the job, not suited at all.

I was sitting in an American English class at the University of Arizona, what seems like an eon ago, when a woman, older than the rest of us by probably 15 years or so, raised her hand and asked the teacher why we weren’t reading Stephen King for this class. I remember distinctly peering at the syllabus and seeing Steinbeck, Faulkner, Hemingway and Fitzgerald among others. It was the canon of American Literature about to be explored by some of us in depth and by some of us only by way of Cliff Notes or Sparks Notes. Some in the class I could almost pick them out by their shiny perfect teeth, which I found abhorrently boring like trees planted in perfect rows, belonged to the Greek Houses and would be showing up to class only to turn in their papers carefully culled from the vast files of papers written by past Sorority Sisters or Fraternity Brothers who had received As in this class for their efforts. After all it isn’t about learning, but about passing. I’m there probably feeling slightly nauseous from the flashing brilliance of pearly whites from the orthodontically challenged when the teacher turns to me and says “Jeff why do you think we aren’t teaching King in this class?”

Here I am thinking about this woman wanting to wedge King between my literary hero F. Scott Fitzgerald and Ernest Hemingway. I don’t think I’d even read King at this point, but I’d been working in a bookstore for many years and knew how important he was to providing me with a paycheck. He developed cross genre appeal bringing horror forward from being a subspecies of science-fiction and away from residing in a spinner rack of books at the back of the bookstore for those social abnormals dressed all in black.

I didn’t really know how to answer the question except in the most bland way possible. I said he hasn’t stood the test of time. I could tell my answer was about as satisfying as a week old bagel to the woman, and I was hampered by the fact that I really didn’t want to insult the woman. The teacher also looked mildly disappointed. I could tell she was hoping to see blood in the water and I failed to be the shark she thought me to be.

The woman’s question does show the issue about Stephen King that is debated in most literary circles whether they are a book club down at the local library or the academic break room at a major university. He has legions of fans. He makes millions every time he puts out a new book which feels like four times a year. The problem is he is a genius. He isn’t a genius in the way that Pynchon, Gaddis, or Wallace are geniuses. He is a genius storyteller. So if so many people are reading him he really can’t be any good...can he?

Someone on GR made the really good point that Stephen King does not need him to buy and read his books. He has writer friends, below the radar, that need his support more. That is so true and one of the more annoying things about King followers is that a percentage of them don’t read anything else. They would come into the bookstore and hound us for the release date of the next Stephen King. I would sweep my hand grandly through the air and point out several other authors that may fill the time between King novels. They simply were not interested.

The thing of it is I used to love being one of those scruffy minded individuals that are always trying to find the next great writer before anyone else. There was no reason to read King because there were no points to be scored with my group of pseudo-intellectual friends by saying something so insipid as “is anyone else reading the new King?”

When I worked at Green Apple Books in San Francisco, which by the way that city is one of the best reading publics in the United States, we catered to University professors, want-to-be writers, actors, and a slew of other professionals such as doctors, lawyers, and bankers. It was a well educated lot to say the least. I thought my days of selling King were over....wrong. Customers with wire rimmed glasses and elbow patches on their tweed jackets would bring up these academic books so obscure that I had no idea we even had them in the store, and invariably in the pile somewhere would be a Stephen King novel. I was still too caught up in my self-image as a reader to really think about taking a walk with the “normals” and start reading King, but I was starting to think to myself... hmmm I wonder what’s going on in them thar books?

Redrum.
Murder.
Redrum.
Murder.
(The Red Death held sway over all!)


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Danny, Jack’s five year old son, has what one character referred to as “a shine”. If people are thinking about something intently, Danny can read their thoughts. He also has an invisible friend named Tony who can take him places, a bit more elaborate than my invisible friend Beauregard. What a dud he turned out to be.

Danny loves his father, actually more than his mother Wendy, which is such a painful realization for her. She has stood in the breach. She DIDN'T break his arm. She protects him from everything including his FATHER. As the malevolent force at the hotel begins to exert more and more influence on Jack and Danny she is relatively unaffected by hallucinatory thoughts. The interesting subtext of this novel is that Jack thinks the hotel is after him. As Danny explains:

“It’s tricking Daddy, it’s fooling him, trying to make him think it wants him the most. It wants me the most, but it will take all of us.”

A precocious five year old with a brain of such singular existence that the evil entity of The Overlook Hotel must have him. Another interesting aspect of the book is the fact that most people will not be affected by the ghostly influences of the hotel unless they have an imaginative brain to start with. They must have a mind open enough to hear the voices and realize the possibility that they may be real.

Did I mention that I’m not really interested in that job anymore?

I know this story. I haven’t watched the movie or read the book previously and yet I’m very familiar with the plot.

It didn’t matter.

While reading this book I was on the edge of my seat. My pulse rate elevated. My mind buzzing with lizard brain flight or fight responses. This guy King knows how to tell a story. There is this scene on the stairs between Jack and Wendy that is probably one of the most intense fight scenes I’ve ever read in literature. I was right there with the characters feeling the thud of the roque mallet and the grind of my broken ribs.

Stephen King is a cultural geek of the first order. He enjoys reading and promoting writers. He is a self-made man. A man blessed and haunted by a vivid imagination. He gets big points from me for mentioning Welcome to Hard Times and also McTeague two books that are members of my favorite obscure literature list. I like it when a writer tells us what his characters are reading. He mentions television shows such as The Avengers, which I loved discovering recently that Honor Blackman (Pussygalore) preceded Diana Rigg on that show, and King also mentions Secret Agent Man starring Peter McGoohan. For the last two years I’ve been sifting through old television shows, thank you NETFLIX, and finding shows that I really like. Besides the two shows King mentioned I’ve also enjoyed watching The Baron starring Steve Forrest and Sue Lloyd and the short episodes of Honey West starring the ocelot Bruce. I also have The Saint queued up starring Roger Moore. I have fond memories of watching that show as a child late at night in the summer time.

There has been a hue and cry from his fan base for Stephen King's work to be looked on as literary classics. They feel he is not given the respect he deserves for being a great writer. He is accessible to the average reader, and yet; somehow, puts the right hooks in his writing to please the elevated reader. We do him a disservice, I feel, to try to make him into something he is not. That said, probably the best of King will be read 100 years from now. He is the consummate storyteller still enamored with the unknown and the unknowable. He has a childlike wonder for the world and I for one will make a bigger effort to see the world more often through his eyes.

If you wish to see more of my most recent book and movie reviews, visit http://www.jeffreykeeten.com
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Comments (showing 1-50 of 95) (95 new)


message 1: by Sue (new) - rated it 4 stars

Sue I still remember reading that, the act of reading it and being scared, as much as the story. I stayed up til all hours to finish...it was better than stopping at that point.


Jeffrey Keeten Sue wrote: "I still remember reading that, the act of reading it and being scared, as much as the story. I stayed up til all hours to finish...it was better than stopping at that point."

I've got to give Stephen King props on this one. Excellent pacing on the plot, the consummate storyteller. Review tomorrow if time allows.


Nataliya Can't wait for this review!


Wordsmith REDRUM


message 5: by Sue (new) - rated it 4 stars

Sue I should probably change my rating to 5 based on my memory of it. I read it so long ago. I certainly remember it being highly effective.


Jane I gave up reading King because his images were so horrible and so well written that they stuck very nastily in my head, and I didn't want them in there. Some of them are still there 20 years after I stopped reading him.

But now you're tempting me to read The Shining, which I never got to. Curse you, Jeffrey. What a quandary; I acknowledge King's genius and writing skills, but I'd rather he just went away.


Jeffrey Keeten Jane wrote: "I gave up reading King because his images were so horrible and so well written that they stuck very nastily in my head, and I didn't want them in there. Some of them are still there 20 years after ..."

You are so right he is an image maker, part of his gift as a writer. Haha I'm so glad that I've compelled you to at least reconsider your hiatus from Stephen King. I'm annoyed with Photobucket who is in the midst of this epic upgrade and will not let me load photos.


message 8: by Jeffrey (last edited Aug 20, 2012 11:52AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Jeffrey Keeten Sue wrote: "I should probably change my rating to 5 based on my memory of it. I read it so long ago. I certainly remember it being highly effective."

The reason I landed on 5 was that the book did all that it was supposed to do. I had thrills. I felt the horror. It made me think what would I do? The writing did not get in the way of my enjoying the book. I just finally had to concede that for this type of book it deserved the five stars. It feels odd putting Gravity's Rainbow and The Shining at five stars, but they are judged on different scales with different expectations.


Nataliya Jeffrey wrote: " It feels odd putting Gravity's Rainbow and The Shining at five stars, but they are judged on different scales with different expectations. "

This is a very healthy approach to rating books. Bravo, Jeffrey!


Steve Sckenda Jeffrey your review---- whamming, whacking, smashing, crashing. Jitter and jive, baby. Shake, rattle, and roll.


Steve Sckenda I like how you mix in the personal, the subjective, and the objective in your reviews, Jeffrey. I want to imitate your style, which is very effective.


Steve Sckenda We get to know you and we get to know your books. I love it.


message 13: by Arun (new) - rated it 5 stars

Arun Divakar You know Jeffrey, one reason I love reading your reviews is when you bring in the publisher/book shop POV into the picture. Not many of us have that angle of viewing a book's success or failure.


Wordsmith Jeffrey wrote: "Sue wrote: "I should probably change my rating to 5 based on my memory of it. I read it so long ago. I certainly remember it being highly effective."

The reason I landed on 5 was that the book did..."


Amen brother! Love it!


message 15: by Sue (new) - rated it 4 stars

Sue Jeffrey wrote: "Sue wrote: "I should probably change my rating to 5 based on my memory of it. I read it so long ago. I certainly remember it being highly effective."

The reason I landed on 5 was that the book did..."


Absolutely the perfect way to rate books as far as I'm concerned.


Jeffrey Keeten Nataliya wrote: "Jeffrey wrote: " It feels odd putting Gravity's Rainbow and The Shining at five stars, but they are judged on different scales with different expectations. "

This is a very healthy approach to rat..."


Thanks Nataliya. I think we all struggle to rate books properly. I love the fact that GR allows us to change our ratings at any time.


Jeffrey Keeten Steve wrote: "We get to know you and we get to know your books. I love it."

Thanks Steve. Every time I press the post button on a new review I think this is the review where someone is going to finally figure out that I don't know how to write reviews. haha (I think they have they have just been kindly silent so far.) I'm glad that you appreciate the mix. I sort of review a book, review myself reading the book, and try to tie in what other medias tie into the book. I have some pictures for this review as soon as Photobucket allows me to upload.


Jeffrey Keeten Arun wrote: "You know Jeffrey, one reason I love reading your reviews is when you bring in the publisher/book shop POV into the picture. Not many of us have that angle of viewing a book's success or failure."

Thank you so much Arun. I was very fortunate to spend ten plus years working in the book industry before I had to grow up and get a real job. haha My reviews are heavily influenced by the fact that I was a book seller and part of that job, in those days, was to also market the books to the public. I'm certainly a cheerleader for reading and book selling.

One thing that reading King made me realize is that I'm a reader first and foremost. Sure I like to read books that edify my mind as well, but I also want to be told a story.

Encouraging posts, like yours, really keep me motivated to be a better reviewer.


Jeffrey Keeten Wordsmith wrote: "Jeffrey wrote: "Sue wrote: "I should probably change my rating to 5 based on my memory of it. I read it so long ago. I certainly remember it being highly effective."

The reason I landed on 5 was t..."


Thank you sister!


message 20: by Steve (new)

Steve I especially liked your classroom anecdote as a way of framing the argument of King's merits. You seem to have balanced your view well.


Jeffrey Keeten Steve wrote: "I especially liked your classroom anecdote as a way of framing the argument of King's merits. You seem to have balanced your view well."

Thank you Steve. I was really attempting to balance the review as best I could. I wanted to show King's strengths, but at the same time put him in proper context. Like with most things the sneers and the cheers are a bit off base.


message 22: by knig (new)

knig Phew, its cathartic to have someone else say it, because I too was a spark note lit college 'passer'. I don't know what it was: too busy living, or too rebellious to read what everyone else was reading: I 'sparked' my way through lit with 'A's and felt on top of the world: now I realise, the only person I cheated was myself. I've been quietly and unobtrusively reading stuff like 'Lord of the Flies', Heart of Darkness and the scarlet letter on the side recently, (ish), finally due to a genuine need which I never had at college. And. I like King too. And you know what, also, I like Dan Brown. There is something to be said about riding a wave of gripping intensity, even if you know you're not being baptised in the holy anals of 'golden' literature. I had to break with the mainstream in order to feel like I could 'allow' myself back in it, more deserving this time round. Go figure.


Jeffrey Keeten Knig-o-lass wrote: "Phew, its cathartic to have someone else say it, because I too was a spark note lit college 'passer'. I don't know what it was: too busy living, or too rebellious to read what everyone else was rea..."

I love the fact that you are going back and reading the books you 'sparked'in college. Most people who took a similar path are not going to do that. I had a Jane Austen Survey Class that I valiantly read the first couple of books, but then relied on Cliff to get me through the rest. I didn't really want to be there, but it was the only survey class available to let me graduate on time. I am now making plans to go back and read the Austen's I skimmed. I have been part of the debate on King for what feels like all of my life and so it felt good air some thoughts on both sides of the issue. I too have read and liked Dan Brown. Their books do what they are supposed to do which is entertain.


Karen Wonderful review! The Shining was my first King read....1979. It's still one of my faves.


[Name Redacted] I just can't get into King. I gave him chance after chance over the years and it never worked for me. Frankly, i found your review more interesting than any of his books -- with the possible exception of "The Mist", though even there I had my issues. But you make a compelling case and if I hadn't already read this one your review might almost have convinced me to give it a try.

Though as to why King isn't in the canon, i suspect it has less to do with him being some unrecognized genius storyteller excluded by mean ol' academics, and more to do with the fact that A) he's still alive (that's not a requirement, but it certainly helps canon-wise), and B) genre fiction in general is looked at askance. It's not like Lovecraft or Stoker or Wells are on most "classic literature" reading lists, unless it's as part of some genre-specific course.

Oh, and for what it's worth, Patrick MacGoohan. He was also the star of "The Prisoner" and the villain in an excellent episode of "Columbo".


Jeffrey Keeten Karen wrote: "Wonderful review! The Shining was my first King read....1979. It's still one of my faves."

Thank you Karen! I was pleasantly surprised by how much I liked it.


Jeffrey Keeten Ian wrote: "I just can't get into King. I gave him chance after chance over the years and it never worked for me. Frankly, i found your review more interesting than any of his books -- with the possible except..."

Thanks Ian for reading my review. I don't think that academics are being mean at all. I think they are doing exactly what they are supposed to do. I personally am not advocating that King be part of the canon. I just decided that in my youth I may have been unduly hard on him and holding him to standards that his writing is not meant to compete with.

Using genius is one of those flash words that really makes people nervous. I should have used the term gifted. I do think that King will probably always be considered a genre writer which will keep him from ever being part of the canon.

I tried to watch The Prisoner but the bouncing white ball was just too odd for me. I probably should have watched more episodes. You may not have run across the fact that Patrick McGoohan played the father of the Phantom in the movie version with Billy Zane.


message 28: by Sue (new) - rated it 4 stars

Sue I love how far-ranging this discussion is. I've been a Patrick McGoohan fan for so many years. I believe he was the father in Pollyanna too (on a totally "other" note and world from Secret Agent and The Prisoner). I watched the latter 2 faithfully.

I believe my favorite King is The Stand and I liked the TV adaptation too. I think the ending of Cujo creeped me out the worst.


message 29: by B0nnie (new) - added it

B0nnie Patrick McGoohan is my invisible friend - though when I was a kid it was (really!) a flying snake. So I'll say no no no to the Overlook Hotel.


Traveller A super-A type interesting review as always... you hardly ever disappoint, Jeffrey!


Jeffrey Keeten Sue wrote: "I love how far-ranging this discussion is. I've been a Patrick McGoohan fan for so many years. I believe he was the father in Pollyanna too (on a totally "other" note and world from Secret Agent an..."

Patrick McGoohan had a "NO KISSING" clause in his contract with Secret Agent Man. He believed by kissing his beautiful co-stars that he was being unfaithful to his wife. I actually think that is kind of cool, crazy because I've seen some of his co-stars, but what a straight up guy.


Jeffrey Keeten Traveller wrote: "A super-A type interesting review as always... you hardly ever disappoint, Jeffrey!"

Thank you Traveller.


Jeffrey Keeten B0nnie wrote: "Patrick McGoohan is my invisible friend - though when I was a kid it was (really!) a flying snake. So I'll say no no no to the Overlook Hotel."

Did this flying snake talk to you? Your mind, even then, had so many more dimensions than mine. I had an invisible friend named after a Confederate General. A flying snake would have been WAY cooler.


Traveller I can't believe that so many people had invisible friends and i never did. Maybe it was because i read so much as a little kid already.

Does imagining you are a cat and can climb over roofs and run through alleys count to belong to the club?


Jeffrey Keeten Traveller wrote: "I can't believe that so many people had invisible friends and i never did. Maybe it was because i read so much as a little kid already.

Does imagining you are a cat and can climb over roofs and r..."


Maybe you had more real friends? I would say that imagining you are a cat would definitely qualify... way cooler than poor Gregor Samsa waking up as a beetle creature.


message 36: by Will (new) - rated it 5 stars

Will Byrnes For my money The Shining was King's scariest, particularly the mobile topiary, which was, sadly, omitted from the first film. He writes children exceptionally well. Maybe one comparison might be to Dickens, also a very popular author in his day notable for his young heroes. Although many of King's books do not touch much on social issues there are enough that do to lend some legitimacy to the comparison.

Loved your maze of material, JK, sprinkled with information, interior and exterior. It shines.

Had a chance to visit the Timberline Hotel on Mount Hood, where some exterior shots were done for the film. There is a kitschy, tourist bit inside where one can be photographed holding an axe. Bring your own mad grin.

Also had the pleasure of driving the Going to the Sun road in Glacier NP, the site of the opening sequence where the family drives to the hotel. That's a drive that can be legitimately scary.


message 37: by B0nnie (new) - added it

B0nnie Jeffrey wrote: "I had an invisible friend named after a Confederate General. A flying snake would have been WAY cooler. ..."

Nooo not at all. Robert E. Lee shouting encouragements at ya? And Traveller, a cool parkour cat!


Jeffrey Keeten Will wrote: "For my money The Shining was King's scariest, particularly the mobile topiary, which was, sadly, omitted from the first film. He writes children exceptionally well. Maybe one comparison might be to..."

Interesting comparison with Dickens. I think you are on to something there Will. I'm glad that you did not get lost in the maze of my review. There are lions and tigers and bears oh my. Thank you for your kind words. I'm glad you enjoyed the review.


message 39: by Sue (new) - rated it 4 stars

Sue Will wrote: "For my money The Shining was King's scariest, particularly the mobile topiary, which was, sadly, omitted from the first film. He writes children exceptionally well. Maybe one comparison might be to..."

I agree about the topiary---definitely!


David Great review. I've been a big King fan since way back, and am familiar with the debates over whether or not he's a "real" author. I think the comparisons with Dickens are apt -- Dickens was an extremely commercial author who was very much doing it for the money, but he also really liked writing and he had things to say. So does King.

(Comparing him with Dan Brown is just unfair. King can actually write.)

I only got around to The Shining earlier this year, and then I watched the movies. I was actually rather disappointed in the Stanley Kubrick film; it's a nice piece of cinema, but Kubrick let Jack Nicholson chew the scenery and go completely off-point as far as the novel was concerned.


Jeffrey Keeten David wrote: "Great review. I've been a big King fan since way back, and am familiar with the debates over whether or not he's a "real" author. I think the comparisons with Dickens are apt -- Dickens was an extr..."

Thanks David. Yes I'm really liking the Dickens comparison that Will brought up. I guess I wasn't meaning to compare King to Brown. Brown also has a legion of fans and my only further point to make is that I don't think Brown has pretensions that he is a great writer. In fact I saw an interview where he said writing was really difficult for him. When I used to fly a lot Brown filled some time for me, but also provided good trade bait to other travelers for something they had finished reading. The last time I flew I read The Brothers Karamozov so go figure. I've really enjoyed your reviews David keep them coming.


message 42: by Gary (new) - rated it 5 stars

Gary http://timberlinelodge8-px.trvlclick....

The hotel where the movie with Jack Nicholson was filmed. Creepy as hell.


message 43: by Gary (last edited Sep 02, 2012 09:35AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Gary Great review,Jeff! I am borrowing my son's dvd of THE SHINING. I really do think Jack Nicholson makes the movie, even tho he does venture away from the plot of the book,and King hated it. The made for TV movie filmed at the Stanley, (which King sanctioned,and may have even produced....not sure), well, it pretty well, really sucked, at least for me. I read THE SHINING in high school. Mid 70's! Have not revisited it since. However, I will in October. WE are reading it for bookclub. Two members refuse to read it.....(infidels....I KEELLLL you!). Their loss.

Btw, THE SHINING in the only King novel in 1001 books you need to read before you die! It's quite apt to be included in the list....I really like many of King's books,but this particular one is in my opinion his best novel ever!


Jeffrey Keeten Gary wrote: "Great review,Jeff! I am borrowing my son's dvd of THE SHINING. I really do think Jack Nicholson makes the movie, even tho he does venture away from the plot of the book,and King hated it. The made ..."

Thanks Gary. I look forward to your review in October. I need to start thinking about my October reading list as well. I have been intending to read October Dreams:: A Celebration of Halloweenfor several years, but the days of October just slip through my fingers.


message 45: by Bill (new) - rated it 3 stars

Bill Another excellent review Jeffrey, I very much enjoy your anecdotal asides :)


Jeffrey Keeten Bill wrote: "Another excellent review Jeffrey, I very much enjoy your anecdotal asides :)"

Thank you Bill! I really enjoyed writing this one.


message 47: by Steve (last edited Mar 02, 2013 04:03PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Steve Sckenda I PROTEST GOODREADS! THEY TOOK MY FRIEND JEFFREY KEETEN'S "SHINING" REVIEW AND HID IT FROM THE MASSES BY IMPOSING A SPOILER ALERT ON IT. I DON'T KNOW WHAT SMALL-MINDED, CHILDISH TATTLE TALE, WHO INDULGES IN THE "NARCISSISM OF SMALL DIFFERENCES", REPORTED THIS, BUT YOU HARMED A GREAT REVIEWER AND A GREAT REVIEW. MIND YOUR OWN DAMN BUSINESS OR WRITE YOUR OWN DAMN REVIEW! READ AT YOUR OWN RISK! CAVEAT LECTOR!. COMMENTERS, QUIT TELLING REVIEWERS THEY SPOILED SOMETHING. THE REVIEWER IS THE SOLE JUDGE OF WHEN TO USE A SPOILER TAG. REVIEWERS LIKE JEFFREY KEETEN ARE THE REASON WHY GOODREADS HAS 15 MILLION READERS. GOODREADS -- REMOVE THIS SPOILER TAG BY YOUR OWN UNINFORMED EDITORS, WHO APPARENTLY LIKE TO APPEASE WHINERS. PLEASE READ KEETEN'S REVIEW. TO WHOMEVER JERK REPORTED THIS, JK, SERVED YOU A MEAL, AND YOU WHERE AN UNGRATEFUL GUEST!!!! YOU ARE THE SPOILER, NOT HE!

http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/...


message 48: by Zenmoon (last edited Mar 02, 2013 03:58PM) (new)

Zenmoon Thanks for bringing it to our attention Steve. One look at the first word in caps and it was obvious you were well and truly pissed off. I'm curious though. Does Goodreads have the power to censor reviews or does that come about from somebody reporting? And @ Jeffrey, I shall certainly take the time to read the review. Rebellion!


Steve Sckenda Zenmoon wrote: "Thanks for bringing it to our attention Steve. One look at the first word in caps and it was obvious you were well and truly pissed off. I'm curious though. Does Goodreads have the power to censor ..."

It stupefies me that that GR staff would have imposed the spoiler alert on JK. I had no idea they wasted time on such police patrols given the hundreds of thousands of reviews on this site and the weird guys, posing as women, who are out trolling for lonely people and bank account numbers.


Jeffrey Keeten Steve wrote: "I PROTEST GOODREADS! THEY TOOK MY FRIEND JEFFREY KEETEN'S "SHINING" REVIEW AND HID IT FROM THE MASSES BY IMPOSING A SPOILER ALERT ON IT. I DON'T KNOW WHAT SMALL-MINDED, CHILDISH TATTLE TALE, WHO IN..."

I haven't committed a felony since I was 4, but if I ever do and I get caught you are my first phone call. I truly appreciate your sentiments expressed here. This is the only review I've had tagged with a spoiler alert... to my knowledge. It is a head scratcher for sure. My goal is to get as many people as possible to read every book I read. A spoiler tag makes it sound like I slammed the oven door resulting in the soufflé falling making an uneatable dish or in this case an unreadable review. What would be nice is if GR would do the courtesy of sending us notes before they flag a review with a spoiler alert and give us a chance to decide if some minor changes would make everyone happy. After all this is a labor of love where they profit off of our FREE contributions. Thank you Mr. Kendall you are a true friend to take the time to write such an inspiring response. I'm truly touched.


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