Tash's Reviews > His Very Own Girl

His Very Own Girl by Carrie Lofty
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Sep 13, 12

Read from August 13 to 14, 2012

Reviewed for Confessions From Romaholics

To see review at Confessions

In her latest book, Carrie Lofty takes on WW2 and writes a story that fans of her writing will love and I fully expect there will be new fans of this author by the time this book is released and people spread the world. Lulu Davis is an ATA (Air Transport Auxiliary) pilot, a British civilian air force open to all women and men who are declared F4—unfit for military service. Since the death of her parents, and only a few months later, her fiancé, at the start of the war she has dedicated herself to becoming the best woman pilot ATA has.

It is 1944 and she is waiting on a decision that will allow her to fly four engine planes which has been her goal and will mean she gets to fly into the war zone potentially. It has kept her going and motivated to become the best but she is hurting over the trauma of past events and doesn’t realize it. She spends her days with her two best friends, Betsy, an American who married to a Englishman in the Air Force, and Pauline who flirts from one man to another, never committing but holding out for the man of her dreams. Lulu’s lack of commitment is much the same but for different reasons: she closed off her heart to any man but she’s willing to dance with the GI’s she meets and write to some of them afterward who are lonely.

Her life changes when she makes a crash landing at the Wymeswold airfield after her plane has troubles and survives to the amazement of her rescuer, Private Joe Webber, a American medic who happens to be nearby. He bandages her up and she’s on her way back to the local ATA base for the Leicestershire area and Joe is left wondering about this mysterious girl who provided his first real experience as a combat medic.

Joe has his own demons from his past that he has kept secret from his company, hoping to get a fresh start, but he has a problem in a lieutenant who happens to be assigned to his division (Pauline ‘s current fellow) who knows he’s been in jail but doesn’t know the reason. So when he is spotted by Lulu who is bored after being left by a GI in a bar, she see an opportunity to get to know him and thank him. However, the lieutenant decides to make to teach Joe a lesson because he wants Lulu.

Lulu is livid and decides to write him off but is soon drawn back to him by her friend Pauline who arranges her to meet Joe again at the movies as a blind date. Lulu can’t get him out of her head and she decides to play a cat and mouse game to tempt him. With tensions running at all-time high, the two consume their passions and the secrets start to emerge about their pasts. Joe is about to air drop to France and Lulu is getting her training for four engine airplanes so things are happening in their respective lives leaving Lulu penning letters to Joe, revealing more about herself and things happening in her life.

When Joe arrives back in England on a weekend leave he a mess, and not happy that Lulu is transferring to another base for the opportunity to fly in the warzone. He wants her to quit and marry him. Lulu is hurt, the weekend ends in ruin with Joe landing in Holland after he returns back to his division. Their limited contact through correspondence continues and with the war drawing too close, Lulu decides to marry him and sends him a picture that results in Joe losing his judgment, which has kept him safe all this time.

With Lulu flying all over the world and Joe unable to tell he that he injured, an old acquaintance from their past arrives with important information for Lulu. This is where the magical story ends and we see a satisfy conclusion to their story. It is hard not to fall in love with this couple. It’s a typical story we hear about from WW2 survivors about sweethearts and GI’s. 4 couples.
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Reading Progress

08/13/2012
50.0%

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