Kerry's Reviews > Revealing Eden

Revealing Eden by Victoria Foyt
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Jul 27, 12

bookshelves: reviewed, young-adult

-Blackface is not edgy or progressive.
-Naming a race of people "Coal" is not a compliment.
-Telling us that "Pearl" is a slur does not make it so.
-Claiming that the world's hierarchy is dependent on skin tone does not mean that you can separate people based on race while ignoring their actual skin color.
-Calling your heroine's love interest a "beast" does not imply his supposed beauty and high status.
-Questioning the existence of an African-American community of readers will make me side-eye you damn hard.
- Telling us that this "terrifying" dystopian future is "all too easy to imagine" is ignoring the prevalence of racism and white privilege that currently exists in our society.

We get it - You believe that special white snowflakes always deserve to be the heroine because their lives are oh so hard. Why not just come out and admit to all the racist imagery and insulting propaganda you're publishing? This book is disgusting.

There is never a reason to make racism about white people. Repeat that as many times as you have to before it finally sinks in.
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Comments (showing 1-10 of 10) (10 new)

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message 1: by G (new) - rated it 1 star

G "There is never a reason to make racism about white people." THANK YOU!


message 2: by Lorena (new)

Lorena Actually, it is beyond the point of this book, but I've actually been discriminated because I was too white. And this was school, so racism happens to anyone out there, not just black people.


Kerry Lorena wrote: "Actually, it is beyond the point of this book, but I've actually been discriminated because I was too white. And this was school, so racism happens to anyone out there, not just black people."

As a white person, we (both of us) have never and will never experience institutionalized racism. You may have been discriminated against or met prejudiced people, but that is not at all the same as facing racism. This is a huge distinction that needs to be recognized, especially considering the amount of privilege that we have every day.


message 4: by Yoki (new) - rated it 1 star

Yoki Are you a member of ONTD? Some of the terms you use, remind me of that site.


Kerry No, I've never been able to get too invested in ONTD. I have been on Livejournal for 10+ years now though, so it's possible I picked up the lingo that way.


Kozato Actually, it is beyond the point of this book, but I've actually been discriminated because I was too white. And this was school, so racism happens to anyone out there, not just black people.

Racism is institutional: it means that society as a whole is steeped in the notion that a race is inferior, causing the systems (of justice, economics, etc.) to be biased against them. In America, where the author is from, white people cannot experience racism because white people built the system

Lorena, what you experienced was discrimination, which is unfortunate but not a deeply rooted, systematic problem the way racism is.


message 7: by Lorena (new)

Lorena Actually I think discrimination is a deeply rooted systematic problem, and the well from which racism springs.

It is easy enough for any act of discrimination to transform into racism. The moment a child 6 years old is discriminating on skin color, the seed is there.

The fact that someone makes a races name in fiction something that accompanies images of dirt and another something that is used to make the most precious jewelry, well, you can get the idea that the why of these names is deeply engraved into that person's brain.


message 8: by Lorena (new)

Lorena And how can you say that black people are not in the system in the US when you guys have a black President and a black First Lady? Also, you don't see many cross race couples in those high circles, in EITHER one.


message 9: by Lani (new) - added it

Lani Telling us that this "terrifying" dystopian future is "all too easy to imagine" is ignoring the prevalence of racism and white privilege that currently exists in our society.

Yep.


message 10: by Kerry (new) - rated it 1 star

Kerry Lorena, until there is an internal power structure that actively oppresses white people, then there is absolutely no foundation in claiming that our individual experiences with discrimination are even a little comparable to racism. Not even close.

Even Obama has openly discussed how his election does not prove anything in terms of balancing out racial power or bringing on a post-racial society. The problem isn't that "black people are not in the system" (something that no one here has claimed), the problem is that the system is historically and inevitably biased against the advancement of minorities as a whole. That problem cannot be solved by one or two individuals in power, no matter how highly publicized their skin color may be.

While this is really not the ideal setting for an in-depth conversation on race, it would truly benefit you to do some research on white privilege in modern culture. And I mean that respectfully. This is a subject that needs to be actively and intellectually engaged in - You cannot simply rely on your own personal experiences.


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