Katie's Reviews > The Poisonwood Bible

The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver
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's review
May 29, 11

bookshelves: books-read-in-2008, books-read-pre-2008, favorites, books-read-in-2011, beforetv
Read in May, 2011

Re-read 5-29-11

Love, love, LOVE this book!
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Quotes Katie Liked

Barbara Kingsolver
“Listen. To live is to be marked. To live is to change, to acquire the words of a story, and that is the only celebration we mortals really know. In perfect stillness, frankly, I've only found sorrow.”
Barbara Kingsolver, The Poisonwood Bible

Barbara Kingsolver
“I wonder that religion can live or die on the strength of a faint, stirring breeze. The scent trail shifts, causing the predator to miss the pounce. One god draws in the breath of life and rises; another god expires.”
Barbara Kingsolver, The Poisonwood Bible

Barbara Kingsolver
“Don’t try to make life a mathematics problem with yourself in the center and everything coming out equal. When you’re good, bad things can still happen. And if you’re bad, you can still be lucky.”
Barbara Kingsolver, The Poisonwood Bible

Barbara Kingsolver
“My father wears his faith like the bronze breastplate of God's footsoldiers while our mother's is more like a good cloth coat with a secondhand fit.”
Barbara Kingsolver, The Poisonwood Bible

Barbara Kingsolver
“I attempted briefly to consecrate myself in the public library, believing every crack in my soul could be chinked with a book.”
Barbara Kingsolver, The Poisonwood Bible

Barbara Kingsolver
“The death of something living is the price of our own survival, and we pay it again and again. We have no choice. It is the one solemn promise every life on earth is born and bound to keep. ”
Barbara Kingsolver, The Poisonwood Bible

Barbara Kingsolver
“Everything you're sure is right can be wrong in another place. ”
Barbara Kingsolver, The Poisonwood Bible

Barbara Kingsolver
“Every life is different because you passed this way and touched history. Even the child Ruth May touched history. Everyone is complicit. The okapi complied by living, and the spider by dying. It would have lived if it could. Listen: being dead is not worse than being alive. It is different, though. You could say the view is larger.”
Barbara Kingsolver, The Poisonwood Bible

Barbara Kingsolver
“...trust in Creation which is made fresh daily and doesn’t suffer in translation. This God does not work in especially mysterious ways. The sun here rises and sets at six exactly. A caterpillar becomes a butterfly. A bird raises its brood in the forest and a greenheart tree will only grow from a greenheart seed. He brings drought sometimes followed by torrential rains and if these things aren’t always what I had in mind, they aren’t my punishment either. They’re rewards, let’s say for the patience of a seed.”
Barbara Kingsolver, The Poisonwood Bible

Barbara Kingsolver
“But we've all ended up giving body and soul to Africa, one way or another. Even Adah, who's becoming an expert in tropical epidemiology and strange new viruses. Each of us got our heart buried in six feet of African dirt; we are all co-conspirators here. I mean, all of us, not just my family. So what do you do now? You get to find your own way to dig out a heart and shake it off and hold it up to the light again.”
Barbara Kingsolver, The Poisonwood Bible

Barbara Kingsolver
“I could never work out whether we were to view religion as a life-insurance policy or a life sentence. I can understand a wrathful God who'd just as soon dangle us all from a hook. And I can understand a tender, unprejudiced Jesus. But I could never quite feature the two of them living in the same house. You wind up walking on eggshells, never knowing which... is at home at the moment.”
Barbara Kingsolver, The Poisonwood Bible

Barbara Kingsolver
“For time and eternity there have been fathers like Nathan who simply can see no way to have a daughter but to own her like a plot of land. To work her, plow her under, rain down a dreadful poison upon her. Miraculously, it causes these girls to grow. They elongate on the pale slender stalks of their longing, like sunflowers with heavy heads. You can shield them with your body and soul, trying to absorb that awful rain, but they'll still move toward him. Without cease they'll bend to his light. ”
Barbara Kingsolver, The Poisonwood Bible
tags: abuse

Barbara Kingsolver
“We came from Bethlehem, Georgia bearing Betty Crocker cake mixes into the jungle.”
Barbara Kingsolver, The Poisonwood Bible

Barbara Kingsolver
“There is a strange moment in time, after something horrible happens, when you know it's true, but you haven't told anyone yet.”
Barbara Kingsolver, The Poisonwood Bible
tags: fear


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