Fátima's Reviews > Memoirs of a Dutiful Daughter

Memoirs of a Dutiful Daughter by Simone de Beauvoir
Rate this book
Clear rating
Sign into Goodreads to see if any of your friends have read Memoirs of a Dutiful Daughter.
Sign In »

Quotes Fátima Liked

Simone de Beauvoir
“…but all day long I would be training myself to think, to understand, to criticize, to know myself; I was seeking for the absolute truth: this preoccupation did not exactly encourage polite conversation.”
Simone de Beauvoir, Memoirs of a Dutiful Daughter

Simone de Beauvoir
“The books I liked became a Bible from which I drew advice and support; I copied out long passages from them; I memorized new canticles and new litanies, psalms, proverbs, and prophecies, and I sanctified every incident in my life by the recital of these sacred texts. My emotions, my tears, and my hopes were no less sincere on account of that; the words and the cadences, the lines and the verses were not aids to make believe: but they rescued from silent oblivion all those intimate adventures of the spirit that I couldn’t speak to anyone about; they created a kind of communion between myself and those twin souls which existed somewhere out of reach; instead of living out my small private existence, I was participating in a great spiritual epic.”
Simone de Beauvoir, Memoirs of a Dutiful Daughter

Simone de Beauvoir
“In fact, the sickness I was suffering from was that I had been driven out of the paradise of childhood and had not found my place in the world of adults. I had set myself up in the absolute in order to gaze down upon this world which was rejecting me; now, if I wanted to act, to write a book, to express myself, I would have to go back down there: but my contempt had annihilated it, and I could see nothing but emptiness. The fact is that I had not yet put my hand to the plow. Love, action, literary work: all I did was to roll these ideas round in my head; I was fighting in an abstract fashion against abstract possibilities, and I had come to the conclusion that reality was of the most pitiful insignificance. I was hoping to hold fast to something, and misled by the violence of this indefinite desire, I was confusing it with the desire for the infinite.”
Simone de Beauvoir, Memoirs of a Dutiful Daughter


No comments have been added yet.