Kcatty's Reviews > Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince

Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince by J.K. Rowling
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Jun 01, 13

bookshelves: hp-rowling, i-has-it, movies
Read in October, 2008

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Quotes Kcatty Liked

J.K. Rowling
“It was, he thought, the difference between being dragged into the arena to face a battle to the death and walking into the arena with your head held high. Some people, perhaps, would say that there was little to choose between the two ways, but Dumbledore knew - and so do I, thought Harry, with a rush of fierce pride, and so did my parents - that there was all the difference in the world.”
J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince

J.K. Rowling
“Do you remember me telling you we are practicing non-verbal spells, Potter?"
"Yes," said Harry stiffly.
"Yes, sir."
"There's no need to call me "sir" Professor."
The words had escaped him before he knew what he was saying.”
J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince

J.K. Rowling
“What do I care how 'e looks? I am good-looking enough for both of us, I theenk! All these scars show is zat my husband is brave!”
J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince

J.K. Rowling
“It is the unknown we fear when we look upon death and darkness, nothing more.”
J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince

J.K. Rowling
“Dumbledore says people find it far easier to forgive others for being wrong than being right.”
J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince

J.K. Rowling
“You never get it right, you people, do you? Either we've got Fudge, pretending everything's lovely while people get murdered right under his nose, or we've got you, chucking the wrong people into jail and trying to pretend you've got 'The Chosen One' working for you!”
J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince

J.K. Rowling
“When we come face-to-face with one down a dark alley, we're going to be having a shufti to see if it's solid, aren't we, we're not going to be asking, 'Excuse me, are you the imprint of a departed soul?”
J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince

J.K. Rowling
“The thing about growing up with Fred and George," said Ginny thoughtfully, "is that you sort of start thinking anything's possible if you've got enough nerve.”
J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince

J.K. Rowling
“I don't mean to be rude—" he began, in a tone that threatened rudeness in every syllable.
"Yet, sadly, accidental rudeness occurs alarmingly often," Dumbledore finished the sentence gravely.”
J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince

J.K. Rowling
“No, it was honest," said Harry. "One of the only honest things you've said to me. You don't care whether I live or die, but you do care that I help you convince everyone you're winning the war against Voldemort.”
J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince

J.K. Rowling
“I don't think you should be an Auror, Harry," said Luna unexpectedly. Everybody looked at her. "The Aurors are part of the Rotfang Conspiracy, I thought everyone knew that. They're working to bring down the Ministry of Magic from within using a mixture of dark magic and gum disease.”
J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince

J.K. Rowling
“Killing is not so easy as the innocent believe.”
J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince

J.K. Rowling
“I would rather die than betray his trust."
"That's not saying much, seeing as you're already dead," Ron observed.
"Once again, you show all the sensitivity of a blunt axe," said Nearly Headless Nick in affronted tones.”
J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince

J.K. Rowling
“You said to us once before," said Hermione quietly, "that there was time to turn back if we wanted to. We've had time, haven't we?”
J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince


Comments (showing 1-9 of 9) (9 new)

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Carrie Very interesting reimagining of Sirius's role in Harry Potter. Perhaps you should write fantasy books.


Kcatty Nah, I don't think so; fan-fic isn't my thing, really - I'm more of a short story and novella writer. And if I do write fan-fiction, it's because there's a scene that's stuck in my head and all my free time is consumed by my imagination; and the scenes I imagine are for books that haven't been published yet, for the most part. Personally I have nothing against fan-fic, but I'm just not the kinda person who likes to write it. This hypothetical scene, for example, was just the most logical thing I could think of for Sirius to stay living. But thanks for the suggestion!


Carrie I didn't mean fan-fiction. I meant an actual novel, like a fantasy novel or perhaps a supernatural novel. You seem to have the imagination for it. I plan to write young adult romance. I'm working on a book right now. I am an amateur at writing fiction, yet I love it. It's fun, but there is much involved to crafting a 4 star novel. A novel that flows, is interesting, and has dynamic characters who experience conflict, loss, and real emotion. A story that comes together superbly.


Basabi Bora I totally go with you Kcatty.I mean the ending of Sirius's story was not that satisfying...I mean,it could have been more of your type.


Kcatty I know! The only thing I ever disliked about the books.
I do understand, though, what Rowling was doing. The character development and the idea that Harry doesn't have anybody to look up to anymore (especially after Dumbledore dies).
Plus the symbolism of the Marauders' deaths: it takes all four off them, in their own efforts, to destroy Voldemort. James protects his son, and Voldemort goes into hiding; Sirius helps Harry prove that Voldemort's back; Pettigrew helps Harry escape from the Malfoys; and Remus dies fighting in Hogwarts.
But still...

I should probably finish the review...


message 6: by Carrie (last edited Jun 01, 2013 07:02PM) (new) - rated it 2 stars

Carrie It is a common theme in YA fiction that the main character teen has to figure things out for himself or herself that's why they are often orphans, only children, and their parents are often absent. One of the rules of writing YA adult fiction is to "kill the parents" or any adult influence so the teen protagonist can come of age or make his or her character arch without any influence or interference from adults.


Kcatty I know, I know!
That doesn't mean I have to like it, though.


Carrie True, but I do find the YA novels where adults are helping not to be as exciting. Just saying.


Kcatty True. But I felt that Rowling could have written it so that Sirius and Remus could have survived.
The seventh book has to do with the next generation taking their turn to fight Voldemort, save the world, assert themselves, etcetera, and even though one way to do that was to kill everybody nearly everybody in the Order of the Phoenix, there could be other ways to write that coming of age for Harry and his generation, without killing some of the best characters.


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