Best_beloved's Reviews > A Greek God at the Ladies' Club

A Greek God at the Ladies' Club by Jenna McKnight
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Nov 12, 2008

did not like it
bookshelves: omg-no, romance-paranormal, romance-contempory
read count: 1

A retelling of Pygmalion, sort of. The set up for this book is that Darius, Greek god of Gems, changed himself into a statue and couldn’t change back when his statue was smashed. He was cursed by Zeus to remain without a body until someone creates a perfect statue of him to replace the one that was lost. Yeah, I know. Anyway, this means when that when Alexandra sculpts a marble statue of Darius, he inhabits it and becomes flesh again. Voila, no more statue. Downside? If he gets injured in anyway, a scratch or stubs his toe, statue. Obviously, this is annoying. It’s annoying to Darius, it’s annoying to Alex, and, most importantly, it’s annoying to the reader.

This whole book reads like something the author wrote after too many late night IMing sessions or way too much alcohol. Most of the book is centered on the Zany Adventures & Wacky Hijinks of the newly returned God. Some highlights include, but are not limited to:

Building catching on fire
Stolen Jewelry
Out of control police cars
Tiring amount of statue/not statue
Planted jewelry
Secret curses
Threats
Shooting
Secret children

I spent the first 50 pages wearing the polite social smile of someone listening to a bad joke, and the next 150 pages begging, begging for any character development or even a smidgeon of plot. Around page 200 (pacing, pacing, pacing) the author realized what everyone already has – you need more than Zany Adventures & Wacky Hijinks to form a relationship - especially when one of the characters keeps trying to make the other turn into stone. For most of the book, Alexandra would rather Darius be a statue. She needs him to raise money for the orphans (Really orphans. No, this is not a Victorian novel, why do you ask?) and, less importantly, her career. So, when he’s human, she doesn’t have her artwork.

The relationship between the Playboy God (yes, that’s his official moniker) and Alexandra the feisty, orphan loving sculptress is incredibly compressed. Darius falls in love, in less than 10 days, based on the way Alexandra rasps a file across his marble body. No, not kidding. Alexandra begins to have feelings for Darius because her ex-husband was a jerk. She was in a car accident and has a scar on her stomach. It sounds like it would be painful and ugly, but it’s on her stomach. Anyway, as soon as she’s out of the hospital he leaves her telling her that she’s not longer beautiful. Again, because of a scar on her stomach. Anyway, Darius doesn’t mind the scar which makes her fall in love, kinda, although she would still rather have a statue.

Sadly, Alexandra suffers tragically from Too Stupid Too Live. In this age, most adults know that if you unplug your television, it shouldn’t still play. Also, things just don’t float around your apartment. Lastly, if a life size nude marble statue that takes more than four men to lift disappears and a man looking suspiciously like said statue is left in its place – don’t accuse the naked stranger of stealing it.

Anyway, Darius beaks Zeus’ curse and gets his body back permanently or so he thinks. But he still turns into a statue at night. Why? It turns out that Hera wants grandchildren and cursed him to be a statue until he agrees to marry the goddess of her choice, live at Olympus, and has children. Yeah, it didn’t seem likely to me either.

In better hands, this book could have been good. As it stands, it’s poorly paced and annoying.



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Comments (showing 1-2 of 2) (2 new)

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message 1: by Grace (new)

Grace Tjan "Sadly, Alexandra suffers tragically from Too Stupid Too Live. In this age, most adults know that if you unplug your television, it shouldn’t still play. Also, things just don’t float around your apartment. Lastly, if a life size nude marble statue that takes more than four men to lift disappears and a man looking suspiciously like said statue is left in its place – don’t accuse the naked stranger of stealing it."

This has got to be the most hilarious review I've ever read ever.


message 2: by Manny (new)

Manny A retelling of Pygmalion, sort of.

Are you sure it's not a gender-reversed retelling of Mannequin? Of course, I suppose that could in turn be a retelling of Pygmalion.


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