knig's Reviews > Hyperion

Hyperion by Dan Simmons
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Jul 15, 12

bookshelves: 2012, scifi
Recommended to knig by: mark monday
Read from July 08 to 12, 2012

Outstanding, even for a reluctant sci-fi novice such as yours truly. As the saying goes, ‘a long time from now, in a far, far away part of the Galaxy’, Hyperion oscillates as a lone outpost planet: inadmissible for political reasons to ‘the web’ (just read ‘the Federation' here and you get the picture).

Hyperion refers directly to Keats’ abandoned poem dedicated to Titanomachia in an undisguised parallel between the subject matter there and current events in the now Web. Whilst Christianity (and other religions) are in fast decline, a new God (the Shrike: half metal half organic) is on the rise: and the Technocore (sentient and seceded AI intelligence) predicts an imminent and monumental interstellar battle for this novation.

Seven pilgrims have been chosen to travel deep into the bowels of Hyperion and rendezvous with the Shrike in an attempt to plead/thwart/destroy it. This first book in the trilogy sees them make it only to the base of its ‘lair’ (the Time Tombs), before Simmons shuts shop.

En route the seven disparate individuals (a scholar, military general, poet, priest, etc: a rounded sample straddling the social hierarchy), well, tell tales. (Their personal stories and how it all ties in with Hyperion). It is this plot device which earns this novel the moniker of a contemporary ‘Canterbury tales’.

Simmons is pure genius: the stories are complex, multi vocce, rich in tonal gamut, interwoven with a nod to every major politico-philosophical-genre oeuvre in historical consciousness, and expertly juxtaposed to reveal an ever increasing interdependence and accretion of the jigsaw puzzle pieces needed to defragmentalise and populate ‘the big picture’.

Can’t recommend this enough.
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Comments (showing 1-5 of 5) (5 new)

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message 1: by mark (new)

mark monday i'm not so sure you will care for this one, but i'm curious as to what you will think. it is one of my favorites of the genre. but it doesn't have that challenging, literary prose that i think you respond to the most.


knig What! Are you saying I don't know how to have fun with the hoi polloi? I can, I tell you, I can.


message 3: by mark (new)

mark monday ha! we'll see. we shall see!


knig See?


message 5: by mark (new)

mark monday i see!


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