Nataliya's Reviews > Genesis

Genesis by Bernard Beckett
Rate this book
Clear rating

by
3672777
's review
Oct 01, 12

bookshelves: 2012-reads, catie-knows-best
Recommended to Nataliya by: Jim
Read from September 18 to 19, 2012

I was getting smug thinking I figured out where this book was taking me. And then last few pages came, and I all I was able to say was, "Heh. Ummm. Okay. Well, then. Heh." I know, my eloquence is astounding.

"The only thing binding individuals together is ideas. Ideas mutate, and spread; they change their hosts as much as their hosts change them."
Normally I don't care much for spoilers. I can even pompously say that it's the journey I care about, not the destination. (Believe it or not, in the past I used to read the last page of the book before I started it from the beginning. I stopped doing that after I read the last page of "Dark Tower" - you King fans know what I mean!). But I heeded Jim's advice to go into this one completely unspoiled - and man, am I glad I did that! I guessed about half of the ending; but it's the OTHER un-guessed part that gutted me.
"Art was right. In the end, living is defined by dying. Bookended by oblivion, we are caught in the vice of terror, squeezed to bursting by the approaching end. Fear is ever-present, waiting to be called to the surface.
Change brought fear, and fear brought destruction.
"
But I can tell you this much about the plot without being spoiler-y in any way. It is set in the future where an aspiring young scholar Anax, in her attempt to join the legendary Academy, presents her research on Adam Forde, an important historical figure in this world. Oh, and there also is Art - that is, Artificial Intelligence.

This book is told in quite an unconventional fashion. Its structure reminded me a bit of the books I've read for my Classics courses in college. Written as mostly a dialogue, an exposition about the events in which Adam was involved, it made me think of works such as Plato's Symposium (oh hey there, Plato! *waves*) - where tell, not show was how things were done. This particular structure, this tone set this story apart from others I've read recently, and give it a very distinct feel.



And with that distinct feel and voice, this book proceeded to delve into philosophical matters, reminding me a bit of the college slightly-wine-fueled discussions about meaning of life and humanity and what it means to be alive, and all of that stuff that seems profound and frequently is, and is insanely difficult to voice in a coherent way (*). But apparently this was not an issue for this book - maybe because it took away the wine-fueled part ;)

(*) Yes, in college I managed to hang out with the people with whom I could actually and seriously have these conversations. My college friends were amazing, I must say. UC Berkeley rocks (insert a mandatory "Go Bears!" here!) And they would have appreciated this book verily muchly.
"Unable to attribute misfortune to chance, unable to accept their ultimate insignificance within the greater scheme, the people looked for monsters in their midst.

The more the media peddled fear, the more the people lost the ability to believe in one another. For every new ill that befell them, the media created an explanation, and the explanation always had a face and a name. The people came to fear even their closest neighbors. At the level of the individual, the community, and the nation, people sought signs of others' ill intentions; and everywhere they looked, they found them. for this is what looking does.

That was the true challenge the people of this time faced. The challenge of trusting one another. And they fell short of this challenge.
"
All I can really say is that I anticipated a very different turn of events. I was expecting quite a bit more moralistic conclusion, and was almost ready to be semi-disappointed by it, based on where I thought it was heading. And then I got blindsided. In a good way. And it made me think. Really use those thinking muscles. I could almost hear those rusty brain wheels and cogs squeaking - what are we, humans, really about? What makes us any different from machines? What makes us unique? Is there anything that makes us unique? Are we just full of prejudice when we want it to be so?

"People did as they were told because they were working together, focused on a common threat, a shared enemy. But time passes. Fear becomes a memory. Terror becomes routine; it loses its grip."
In its short 150 pages this book manages to touch on the issues of freedom, fear and unity in a society. It manages to explore consciousness and self-awareness. It touches on the questions of trust and betrayal. It addresses how we view and portray history, and how it may serve as a tool or a weapon. It explores the idea of Idea and its contagiousness. It shows that, as we often suspect, things are not what they seem to be. It shows us that there are consequences for that. And it has just the right amount of philosophy to be perfectly challenging and interesting.
"I can't comment on the minds of others. But I can say I believe it suits our purpose to make Adam the noble fool. This is always the problem with building heroes. To keep them pure, we must build them stupid. The world is built on compromise and uncertainty, and such a place is too complex for heroes to flourish."
In a way this book reminded me - in spirit - of another book featuring AI that I've read this year - Valente's Silently and Very Fast. Now don't misunderstand me - these two books are different like night and day, but they share a common motif on intelligence and thinking and being alive, and take such different and yet equally thought-provoking approaches to it that it'd be very interesting to read them back-to-back. To those who haven't read either one of these, I'd recommend that.

All this said, I'm very impressed by this book. I wish I could say more, but it's hard if I want to keep this review spoiler-free, and I fully intend to keep my promise on that. So I will just give it 4.5 stars and a heartfelt recommendation.
"Human spirit is the ability to face the uncertainty of the future with curiosity and optimism. It is the belief that problems can be solved, differences resolved. It is a type of confidence. And it is fragile. It can be blackened by fear, by superstition."
----
And here is the link for the excellent review by Jim. Thanks, Jim, for bringing my attention to this one. And thanks, Catie, for sending this book to me. I owe both of you, guys!
70 likes · likeflag

Sign into Goodreads to see if any of your friends have read Genesis.
sign in »

Reading Progress

09/19/2012 page 50
33.0% "The only thing binding individuals together is ideas. Ideas mutate, and spread; they change their hosts as much as their hosts change them." 3 comments
09/19/2012 page 73
48.0% "A random thought - why do the eyes of all literary characters always 'darken' when they are unhappy or frustrated? I'm yet to observe this phenomenon in real life, and yet it's an established fact in literature. Why are we perpetuating that? I can tell from other clues that Adam is frustrated, without the need for ocular color change." 4 comments
09/19/2012 page 101
67.0% "I can't comment on the minds of others. But I can say I believe it suits our purpose to make Adam the noble fool. This is always the problem with building heroes. To keep them pure, we must build them stupid. The world is built on compromise and uncertainty, and such a place is too complex for heroes to flourish.
-----
I... I think I have a hunch as to where this story is going. The title is the clue, right?" 3 comments

Comments (showing 1-50 of 73) (73 new)


message 1: by Jim (new) - rated it 5 stars

Jim :D


message 2: by Katy (new) - added it

Katy Your college friends sound a lot like my college friends. One in particular - we used to go, drink beer, read poetry, and make up silly toasts ("to Nietzsche, he didn't give a damn!" that sort of thing). My boyfriend at the time, he and I used to have long arguments over the Large Hadron Collider and the decision to use it, etc. While drinking... ;-) Of course. There is a time and place for everything, and that time and place is college! :-)

This sounds like a fascinating book... As usual, your reviews are cogent and interesting.


Trudi I love how you can fit Plato and Chandler in the same review and make it work! You are awesome :)


Nataliya Thanks, Katy!
I'm glad we both had awesome college friends. My life has become so much richer thanks to all those experiences, even though I've never discussed the Haldron collider! Somehow most of my friends seemed to be more into humanities than anything. But we've argued politics and literature and history and film and what not! I miss those days sometimes... Go Bears!


Nataliya Trudi wrote: "I love how you can fit Plato and Chandler in the same review and make it work! You are awesome :)"

Hehe, thanks. I think they complement each other rather well ;)


message 6: by Katy (new) - added it

Katy Nataliya wrote: "Thanks, Katy!
I'm glad we both had awesome college friends. My life has become so much richer thanks to all those experiences, even though I've never discussed the Haldron collider! Somehow most of..."


Oh, my friends and I talked about all sorts of things. Back in 1993, when I first started dating my 2nd husband and was just going back to school, the LHC was a big thing in the news, so we talked about it a lot. I was (and still am) interested in quantum physics and quantum metaphysics, even if I have trouble wrapping my tiny little brain around it ... :-)


message 7: by Katy (new) - added it

Katy BTW, I just ordered this book ... :-)


Jonathan That perfectly sums up what I thought about the novel. I too picked out where half the ending was headed and then didn't pick up the other part. Then when I got to the end I was like: oh so that's what it all was about! I realised that I had completely read the book through a set frame (Katy don't read the spoiler :p) (view spoiler)

Also my uni friends and I definitely have those discussions from time to time. I hang out with history students, lit students, linguists - a few drama students and science students also. That's the kind of crowd that discusses this stuff a lot.


message 9: by Jim (new) - rated it 5 stars

Jim Great review, Nataliya! And thanks for the link to mine - much appreciated.;)

My reactions to the book were extremely similar to yours, and the part about half-guessing the ending was exactly the same for me. Reading your quoted passages, what strikes me again is the combination of philosophical depth and tightly wound logic. For me, the writing is both beautiful to look at and (as you said) an extremely brisk mental workout.

What a great book! Thanks for taking me back into it with your wonderful review.:)


Sesana Fantastic review! I already had this book on my TBR, but you got me really excited to read it. And the quotes you used... Wow. I'm already impressed by the writing.


Nataliya Sesana wrote: "Fantastic review! I already had this book on my TBR, but you got me really excited to read it. And the quotes you used... Wow. I'm already impressed by the writing."

Thanks, Sesana! The writing in this book is indeed very good.
--------------
Jim wrote: "Great review, Nataliya! And thanks for the link to mine - much appreciated.;)

My reactions to the book were extremely similar to yours, and the part about half-guessing the ending was exactly the ..."


Thanks, Jim! And here I was for a while, gloating in my smugness about being right - until I got to the ending and realized how well I have been played.

I agree with you - this was an excellent book.
-------------------
Jonathan wrote: "That perfectly sums up what I thought about the novel. I too picked out where half the ending was headed and then didn't pick up the other part. Then when I got to the end I was like: oh so that's ..."

(view spoiler)


Mosca Nataliya,

Our common friend Jim said at the beginning of his review:

"READ THIS BOOK - DON'T READ ANY FULL REVIEWS UNTIL YOU READ THE BOOK."

And I hate spoilers.

I will take both of your words for it. It is on my to-read list.


Catie Oh god...I can't believe you read the last page of Dark Tower before you started it!!!! :-O I wish I had never read those pages.

This is a great review though, Nataliya. I'm impressed that you figured out even half of that ending. But I'm glad you were a bit surprised after all. This book really made the little hamster in my brain start running too. :)


Jessie  (Ageless Pages Reviews) Nataliya - I love your reviews. I always look for them for books I am about to read, and they're always so helpful and detailed.

(I still sometimes read the last page of physical books. Just in case I die/lose the book/etc. I want to know! I do it less so with digital novels, but occasionally.....)


message 15: by Katy (new) - added it

Katy ☆Jessie☆ (Ageless Pages Reviews) wrote: "(I still sometimes read the last page of physical books. Just in case I die/lose the book/etc. I want to know! I do it less so with digital novels, but occasionally..."

Oh, I do this ALL THE TIME! That's one way in which having an ereader keeps me in line, 'cause it's not so easy to do that, but if I'm reading a book and think "Hey, they better not kill off this character!" *rustle rustle rustle to end to check* or "This better not end *blah blah blah*" and then *flip to end to check* Hehehe. But my memory is so bad that I have to read something several times before it really sticks in my brain, so it's not usually a big deal for me.


message 16: by Nataliya (last edited Sep 20, 2012 07:51PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Nataliya Catie wrote: "Oh god...I can't believe you read the last page of Dark Tower before you started it!!!! :-O I wish I had never read those pages.

This is a great review though, Nataliya. I'm impressed that you..."


Thanks, Catie! Yes, that was what cured me of this habit. It used to be such a 'neat' little habit - if I don't like the last page, I will not waste my time on the book. In time, it became more about the last sentence - and most of the time, it was not actually a spoiler. Until the Dark Tower. Where it was all about the last sentence. And that was what made me stop doing that - forever and ever.
On a similar note, when I was a teen, a read an entire book backwards from the last chapter to the first (Frederick Forsyte's The Day of the Jackal. That was kinda fun!)

@ Jessie and Katy - I sometimes still get the compulsion to do that when I have the 'dead tree' edition of the book - it's just so easy to do! Electronic books, however, never make this idea sound tempting at all. There's something very different about actually scrolling forward versus simply physically flipping to the end.
Anyway, I think I've been mostly 'cured' from wanting to get straight to the end for 8 years now. But I still prefer my desert BEFORE the meal, even if I can hold off on knowing the book ending!


message 17: by Katy (new) - added it

Katy Yes, life is uncertain, you should eat dessert first, although why one would want to eat a desert I have no idea ... ;-)


Nataliya I blame this typo on my newly acquired viral bronchitis! For which I blame my patients having a coughing/sneezing fit exactly when I lean in to examine them :(


message 19: by Katy (new) - added it

Katy Nataliya wrote: "I blame this typo on my newly acquired viral bronchitis! For which I blame my patients having a coughing/sneezing fit exactly when I lean in to examine them :("

That sucks - sorry to hear you're sick. I always feel bad for doctors having to be around sick people all the time. Strangely, since I have fibromyalgia and that's supposed to suppress the immune system, but I rarely catch the stuff my husband brings home *knocks on wood*


Nataliya Ouch. Fibromyalgia is not easy to live with; sorry about that, Katy. And most medical staff seem to shrug it off as a medical issue, unfortunately.
My immune system usually works just fine, can't complain. It's just the full-blown assault on it from so many patients lately, when we seem to be in the middle of a nasty everyon-has-bronchitis outbreak over here.


Nataliya Mosca wrote: "Nataliya,

Our common friend Jim said at the beginning of his review:

"READ THIS BOOK - DON'T READ ANY FULL REVIEWS UNTIL YOU READ THE BOOK."

And I hate spoilers.

I will take both of your words ..."


I'm really looking forward to your thoughts about this one when you read it!


Jonathan (view spoiler)

And I agree, don't read any spoilers or plot summaries before you read it. I didn't and it made it worth the read even though I found the book via Goodreads.


message 23: by Katy (new) - added it

Katy Nataliya wrote: "Ouch. Fibromyalgia is not easy to live with; sorry about that, Katy. And most medical staff seem to shrug it off as a medical issue, unfortunately.
My immune system usually works just fine, can't c..."


No, no it is not. *shrug* It took years and years to find the cause of my constant malaise, though, so at least now I know.


Nataliya Jonathan wrote: "[spoilers removed]"

Jonathan, I had the similar reaction to the phrase you referenced - and mine went something like, 'Those kids, grumble grumlbe, put down your electronic device and go enjoy nature, grumble grumble. And get off my lawn!'
(view spoiler)


message 25: by Traveller (new) - added it

Traveller I love your reviews, but for some reason, GR never notifies me of them. :( I have to actually click on you and check what you've been posting lately to find your reviews. It kinda sucks..


Nataliya Traveller wrote: "I love your reviews, but for some reason, GR never notifies me of them. :( I have to actually click on you and check what you've been posting lately to find your reviews. It kinda sucks.."

That's strange, but it's the same thing that often happens for me with Catie's reviews. Frustrating!


Andrea Sounds fascinating. I shall have to get it forthwith - Natalyia has recommended, Derek has enjoyed it, Traveller and Ian have added it - off to kindle store!


Andrea hmmm only audio available. This might be good for driving - definitely safer than reading while driving (traffic jams, red lights...).
@ Nataliya : occupational hazard girl :-(
In winter I examine all chests from BEHIND patients. Also immediately wash my hands after looking in throat and surreptitiously rinse my face.in my basin. But you probably have to use that awful alcohol spray.


message 29: by Traveller (new) - added it

Traveller Andrea wrote: "@ Nataliya : occupational hazard girl :-(
In winter I examine all chests from BEHIND patients. Also immediately wash my hands after looking in throat and surreptitiously rinse my face.in my basin. But you probably have to use that awful alcohol spray."


Nataliya still has to learn to duck quickly. :D
Also got to develop a good aim to miss your other hand when you dart those syringes into the muscle, Nataliya! XD...but, so, aren't you doing obs & gynae anymore?

Anyway, sorry to hear you've been ill. Hope that immune system rallies quickly. Zinc lozenges are good for those throat bugs i've found.


message 30: by Katy (new) - added it

Katy Zinc is good for boosting the immune system... if a person isn't sensitive to it. Personally, I very easily overdose on zinc. One time I was taking multivitamins with high levels of zinc, and then age some Product 19 (100% RDA Zinc) and the combination was too much, causing me to throw up. I have to be very careful not to get any extra zinc EVER to avoid that. *shudders* I hate throwing up...


Jonathan I've never met someone who does enjoy the sensation of vomiting...hang on...nope they just love alcohol!


message 32: by Katy (new) - added it

Katy Jonathan wrote: "I've never met someone who does enjoy the sensation of vomiting...hang on...nope they just love alcohol!"

Actually, my husband says if he's feeling sick, he'd much rather throw up than fight it like I do. Weird dude ...


message 33: by Traveller (last edited Sep 22, 2012 04:37AM) (new) - added it

Traveller Katy wrote: "Zinc is good for boosting the immune system... if a person isn't sensitive to it. Personally, I very easily overdose on zinc. One time I was taking multivitamins with high levels of zinc, and the..."

Yeah, but that's why specifically the lozenges that you suck are better. You keep them in your mouth, and as they dissolve, your mucous membranes absorb a lot of it.
One has to be careful though, they can make things worse ; http://george-eby-research.com/html/b...

So, choose your method and your product wisely, see http://www.dynamicchiropractic.com/mp... and http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/93...


message 34: by Katy (new) - added it

Katy Thanks for the info - more info is better. :-)


message 35: by Traveller (new) - added it

Traveller Katy wrote: "Thanks for the info - more info is better. :-)"

Tho, i must admit, i won't blame you if you completely avoid zinc, what a business to try and figure out which are the 'good' ones, and which ones to avoid! Hopefully the manufacturers have all caught on about the positive ions by now.

I don't get nauseous from zinc, but sucking the 'right' kind of lozenge, leaves a weird taste in one's mouth, i have found.


Nataliya Andrea wrote: "hmmm only audio available. This might be good for driving - definitely safer than reading while driving (traffic jams, red lights...).
@ Nataliya : occupational hazard girl :-(
In winter I exam..."


Heh, it will definitely be safer than reading at red lights! Believe it or not, I've seen quite a few people read their newspaper during driving in the morning commute, and that tends to really scare me. It seems like a perfect recipe for seeing the inside of the trauma bay - or the morgue (even though in that case it will not really be 'seeing').

Oh, it's not examining the chests that is a problem, it's looking into patients' throats - right when they decide to get a cough/sneeze fit. Also, quite a few people bring their sick kids in with them, and those kids would not cover their mouths when they cough! I'm obsessive about washing my hands, and I double up on regular washing PLUS alcohol rub, but I guess learning how to duck better would be beneficial ;)

Traveller wrote: "Nataliya still has to learn to duck quickly. :D
Also got to develop a good aim to miss your other hand when you dart those syringes into the muscle, Nataliya! XD...but, so, aren't you doing obs & gynae anymore?"


I'm still doing OBGYN; but we are required to spend a few months off-service in our intern year, doing some Medicine, ER, urgent care and ICU to be more well-rounded docs. So I have 3 more weeks of urgent care until I go back to the world of labor and delivery and - don't look if you're easily squeamish! - (view spoiler)

Katy wrote: "Actually, my husband says if he's feeling sick, he'd much rather throw up than fight it like I do. Weird dude ... "

Katy, I'm with your husband on that. As much as I hate vomiting, for me it is still better than the nonstop nausea that remains when you try to fight the vomiting reflex.


message 37: by Traveller (new) - added it

Traveller Nataliya wrote: "nd - don't look if you're easily squeamish! - ..."

Re your spoiler: LOL, sounds like you've had an experience or two... Yet again- work on the ducking reflex hahaha- but i suppose you can't risk dropping the poor tyke, eh?

But anyway, now you mention it, you guys do have a lot of, er, fluids to cope with, don't you...

Ah well, Nataliya, be strong and hang in there, at least books are dry. :)


Nataliya Traveller wrote: "Nataliya wrote: "nd - don't look if you're easily squeamish! - ..."

Re your spoiler: LOL, sounds like you've had an experience or two... Yet again- work on the ducking reflex hahaha- but i suppos..."


Oh yeah, I've had those experiences a few times - thank god for full-on face shields! Sometimes you are on the 'receiving end' and there's nothing you can do about that since in some situations - getting the little tyke out is one of them! - ducking is not an option.
We do have lots of bodily fluids to cope with, true. OBGYN is not for the squeamish. We belong to the profession that believes in the knee-high 'moon boots' in anticipation for the literal puddles of blood, after all!


message 39: by Katy (new) - added it

Katy *shudders in revulsion* Sorry; I can usually handle blood and gore, but there have been a few times that really squicked me out. Usually this involves the person doing something to themselves - that scene in the Terminator where Arnold slices open his own arm, or the de-gloving scene in Gerald's Game, but one that really got to me, leading to not only full-on shock and severe nausea for a long period of time was an old book I was reading about healthcare, and particularly a chapter about childbirth - the section about how to expel the afterbirth. It really REALLY freaked me out ... (view spoiler)


Nataliya Ouch. Usually we don't do that! Usually we allow things to happen on their own - gentle traction on the umbilical cord, allowing the placenta to deliver on its own. Sometimes you have to do it the way you described, however - but that's rare. Now one of the scariest things I've seen, the one that left me a bit scarred in my soul was (view spoiler)


message 41: by Katy (new) - added it

Katy Nataliya wrote: "Ouch. Usually we don't do that! Usually we allow things to happen on their own - gentle traction on the umbilical cord, allowing the placenta to deliver on its own. Sometimes you have to do it the ..."

In the ranching community, we call that a prolapse, and I've seen it with cows a lot...

Anyway, I did say this was an "old" book, and written by and for men doing the work. I'm sure any women who knew anything about it shook their heads and clucked. But the description was so thorough ... *shudders*


message 42: by Traveller (last edited Sep 22, 2012 11:41AM) (new) - added it

Traveller [Spoiler tags for the squeamish]
Nataliya wrote: "We do have lots of bodily fluids to cope with, true. OBGYN is not for the squeamish. We belong to the profession that believes in the knee-high 'moon boots' in anticipation for the literal puddles of blood, after all! "

I suppose the bright side of that is that (in theory at least) there's not too much contagious in there, well, depending on what part of the population you are working with... but still, prospective mothers get AIDS screens, so unless it's some kind of emergency, you should be fine re that, at least you're not catching 'flu bugs from them. ..but ok, yeah, i suppose that will depend on ...hmmm, nevermind.

Anyway, reminiscent of what Katie said in her spoiler, to my extreme embarrassment I actually sorta passed out once while watching (view spoiler).

Funny how things can affect you at times, i think it's different when you're actually part of the action rather than a spectator, because it keeps your mind on the practicalities of what should be done, if you know what i mean. Still, i agree that it's not nice to be covered with other people's body fluids, you have my utmost sympathies, Nataliya! Spoiler just for Nataliya's eyes (view spoiler)

Suffice it to say i think oncologists have the worst jobs in the world. :(


Nataliya Katy wrote: "In the ranching community, we call that a prolapse, and I've seen it with cows a lot..."

Oh, we get to see the prolapse too - usually with older women after many childbirths. This one is more of a rare and freaky thing.

@ Traveller - no, you're right, OBGYN has a lower contagion factor than other medical specialties. Oh, and your [spoiler] was quite terrifying, by the way.


message 44: by Traveller (new) - added it

Traveller Nataliya wrote: "@ Traveller - no, you're right, OBGYN has a lower contagion factor than other medical specialties. Oh, and your [spoiler] was quite terrifying, by the way."

Well, at least the patient survived, which is the most important thing, i guess.


Catie I remember during my first childbirth, after my water broke when I was standing up, I started apologizing profusely to the nurse and she was like, "Sweetie, don't apologize. This is a messy business." Haha, she was awesome. I actually ended up having her the second time around too.


Nataliya This IS a messy business :) We have women try to apologize all the time, and the usual reaction is - it's perfectly okay, we expect the mess. The 'miracle of birth' is anything but a clean tidy affair!


message 47: by Katy (new) - added it

Katy Nataliya wrote: "This IS a messy business :) We have women try to apologize all the time, and the usual reaction is - it's perfectly okay, we expect the mess. The 'miracle of birth' is anything but a clean tidy aff..."

SOOO happy I've never gone through it ... I've had enough pain in my life... I prefer the way cats or rats do it - very little muss or fuss... :-)


Nataliya Well, pain-wise I'm a huge proponent of epidurals. They work great, and make everything so much easier, including preparing for any emergencies that may happen. It's too bad so many of my patients have a huge misunderstanding about them.


message 49: by Katy (new) - added it

Katy Nataliya wrote: "Well, pain-wise I'm a huge proponent of epidurals. They work great, and make everything so much easier, including preparing for any emergencies that may happen. It's too bad so many of my patients ..."

Maybe it's that huge-ass needle? Just sayin'... ;-) (that IS the shot into the spine, right?)


Nataliya Katy wrote: "Nataliya wrote: "Well, pain-wise I'm a huge proponent of epidurals. They work great, and make everything so much easier, including preparing for any emergencies that may happen. It's too bad so man..."

Right. But the choice between a one-time needle and hours of pain, and then suffering through a possible repair... not to mention a risk of c-section which is always present and therefore would be so much easier to already have the catheter in place. Basically, if that were me - give me the big needle any time!


« previous 1
back to top