Kiersi's Reviews > Hana

Hana by Lauren Oliver
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Jun 08, 12

bookshelves: you-gotta-be-joking, ya
Read in June, 2012

This book was such a waste of time. Only half of it is actually about Hana; the second half is a "preview" of Pandemonium.

In Delirium, Hana was a delightfully complex and realistic character. In "Hana," she is flattened and demonized. (view spoiler)

Oliver could have done something really cool with this novella. She could have brought us into Hana's voice, which I'd imagined as a sort of no-bullshit, straight-to-the-point energetic narrative; instead, Oliver writes Hana with exactly the same voice and narrative style as Lena in Delirium, which I found confusing and totally opposite of Hana's carefree character.

There were so many places in Delirium where I wondered, "Why would Hana say that?" Why does she tell Lena that without unhappiness, how can you truly be happy? I had hoped "Hana" would delve into these mysterious parts of her character and shed some light. Instead, Oliver picked some random place to insert a new character and this new plot does not intertwine with the plot of Delirium at all. Even the one concurrent scene (where Lena and Hana talk after being apart for three weeks) is not at all what I remember from Delirium.

Even worse than creating a new plot and new character that are not interesting at all, Oliver ignores the one new character that could have been fascinating--Hana's match, Frank, the mayor's son. (view spoiler) Frank's character is inquisitive, genuinely kind, and seems to be hiding some things. I don't know why Oliver (or Hana) simply dismissed him out of hand.

Don't waste your money on this book. It will only disappoint.
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Comments (showing 1-2 of 2) (2 new)

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Velvia Keithley Yes, Oliver explored nothing new in this story, raised a few questions and then ignored them. And in the end of Delirium, Hana alerts Alex of what is going on so that he can help Lena escape. Why would she do that if she informed on her in the first place, to "save" her from herself?


Kiersi Velvia wrote: "Yes, Oliver explored nothing new in this story, raised a few questions and then ignored them. And in the end of Delirium, Hana alerts Alex of what is going on so that he can help Lena escape. Why..."

Right? It just doesn't logically make sense. I wondered the other day if maybe this was the work of a ghost writer.


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