Manny's Reviews > The Sound of Music

The Sound of Music by Richard Rodgers
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Jun 07, 12

bookshelves: why-not-call-it-poetry, children, parody-homage, if-research-were-romance
Read in January, 1965

Rolf and Liesl

[The gazebo in Captain von Trapp's garden. Enter ROLF and LIESL from opposite sides]

LIESL: Oh Rolf!

ROLF: Oh Liesl!

[They embrace passionately. Music starts up in background]

LIESL: I am sixteen, going on seventeen/I know--

ROLF: Can't we take a break for a moment? Let's do something else.

The rest of this review is in my book If Research Were Romance and Other Implausible Conjectures
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Comments (showing 1-26 of 26) (26 new)

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message 1: by Richard (new)

Richard I wouldn't have thought this was one of your favourite things!


Manny Richard wrote: "I wouldn't have thought this was one of your favourite things!"

I was fortunate enough to learn the songs when I was eight, and less critical than I am now. Also, my kids love it.


message 3: by Richard (new)

Richard Manny wrote: "Richard wrote: "I wouldn't have thought this was one of your favourite things!"

I was fortunate enough to learn the songs when I was eight, and less critical than I am now. Also, my kids love it."


Well, if we start at the very beginning (which, you must agree, is a very good place to start), I was exposed to the musical when I was very young--younger than 16 going on 17, in fact even younger than little Gretl. As a toddler I went along with my parents when they saw it in a drive-in theatre. Or so I was told--I don't remember it, and they probably took me so that they could solve a problem like not being able to get a babysitter. But we also had an LP with songs from the musical which didn't make it into the film. Remember "A Bell is no Bell"? I rather liked that one. So long, farewell, auf Wiedersehen, adieu...


message 4: by René (new)

René I don't get it - is this a satire of the actual text?


message 5: by David (new)

David Cerruti Manny wrote: "ROLF."

I think ROFL.


Manny David wrote: "Manny wrote: "ROLF."

I think ROFL."


Thank you David!

René wrote: "I don't get it - is this a satire of the actual text?"

If you don't know the scene in question, search for "sixteen going on seventeen" on YouTube. But really you have to have seen the whole movie to get it.


message 7: by Manny (last edited Jun 07, 2012 07:35AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Manny PS The analysis of 1930s Austrian politics is taken from Chapter XIII of Quigley's Tragedy and Hope.


message 8: by Richard (new)

Richard David wrote: "Manny wrote: "ROLF."

I think ROFL."


ROFL indeed. BTW, David, love that profile pic. How did you persuade the gargoyle to pose with you?


message 9: by David (new)

David Cerruti Richard wrote: “How did you persuade the gargoyle to pose with you?”

My first wife did it. She’s a charmer, and also took the photo.


message 10: by Richard (new)

Richard David wrote: "Richard wrote: “How did you persuade the gargoyle to pose with you?”

My first wife did it. She’s a charmer, and also took the photo."


That's nice! Hope you did not have to promise away your first-born child or anything like that! :)


message 11: by David (new)

David Cerruti In 1965, I saw my high school perform The Sound of Music. About the same time, the movie opened at our neighborhood theater. I wasn’t a fan of musicals, and didn’t see the movie. In those days, theaters had big auditoriums, only one screen, and usually had a new movie every week or two. Well, tSoM ran for a whole year. Jeez, was I annoyed. It was many years before I saw the movie.


Manny Bird Brian wrote: "I can see now if only Rodgers and Hammerstein had read Tragedy & Hope how much better that muscial could have been."

The book was published the year after the movie came out! Talk about ironic. They must have been kicking themselves.


message 13: by Traveller (new)

Traveller Amazing how things seem to change when you grow up, isn't it? Brilliant, Manny!


message 14: by Manny (last edited Jun 07, 2012 10:12AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Manny Thank you Traveller!

Though to be honest, I preferred my first take on the movie. It was disappointing to learn that the Austrian situation was only marginally worse after the Nazis moved in... better not tell your kids if they also happen to like it.


Manny Bird Brian wrote: "Perhaps Quigley's extensive work on that chapter was in part an effort to set the public record straight."

You can't help wondering if he had some kind of thing for Julie Andrews. I mean, there's even more stuff about the British banks... a transparent reference to Mary Poppins if ever I saw one. And that came out the year before Sound of Music. It all connects.


message 16: by Richard (new)

Richard Manny wrote: "Bird Brian wrote: "Perhaps Quigley's extensive work on that chapter was in part an effort to set the public record straight."

You can't help wondering if he had some kind of thing for Julie Andrew..."


"Feed the birds, tuppence a bag" was code for "Invest in war bonds to fund airplanes."


message 17: by Manny (last edited Jun 07, 2012 10:41AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Manny "Feed the birds, tuppence a bag" was code for "Invest in war bonds to fund airplanes."

Oh, I interpreted it as an attack on Keynesian economics...


message 18: by Richard (new)

Richard Manny wrote: ""Feed the birds, tuppence a bag" was code for "Invest in war bonds to fund airplanes."

Oh, I interpreted it as an attack on Keynesian economics..."


You may be right there. After all, your aptitude for decoding language is Keyner than mine.


message 19: by Richard (new)

Richard Bird Brian wrote: "Richard wrote: "Feed the birds, tuppence a bag..."

Deconstructing, "birds" is the British/Australian slang for women, and I think in context it is metaphor for "family"...

"tuppence a bag" is a ..."


So what about the scene where they are all floating up to the ceiling whilst giggling uncontrollably? And the one where they are dancing on the rooftops and then they come down through the chimney? {Horrified gasp) Mary Poppins was a pusher? Oh I don't even want to think about that...


message 20: by Traveller (last edited Jun 07, 2012 01:40PM) (new)

Traveller Strange but true... when my son was around 3-4 years old (about 6-7 odd years ago), he adored Mary Poppins and insisted on watching the movie over and over again, and we had to play it at least once a year for a few years after that.

..and now I have those scenes running all fresh through my mind, with the soot-smeared faces on the roof, the kids taking their savings to the bank, and the wistful melody of :
Though her words are simple and few,
Listen, listen, she's calling to you:
"Feed the birds, tuppence a bag,
Tuppence, tuppence, tuppence a bag."


Heh - she was a commie revolutionary disguised as a dictatorial conservative, that one... ;)


message 21: by Sandy (new)

Sandy Tjan Oh no, I'd never look at Capt. Von Trapp the same way again! You've completely ruined my innocence, Manny. I wish that I never knew anything about pre-anschluss Austrian politics.

Here's a bunch of edelweiss for you.


Manny Sandybanks, it's all Carroll Quigley's fault. I feel exactly the same way.


message 23: by Sandy (new)

Sandy Tjan Manny wrote: "Sandybanks, it's all Carroll Quigley's fault. I feel exactly the same way."

Thou shalt never mix up political analysis and Rodgers & Hammerstein.

I wish I were 8 again.


Manny You're right. No wonder the musical version of Tragedy and Hope flopped.


message 25: by Sandy (last edited Jun 09, 2012 03:01AM) (new)

Sandy Tjan Manny wrote: "You're right. No wonder the musical version of Tragedy and Hope flopped."

It should have been called The Sound of the Great Conspiracy --- that would have been a Broadway hit.


message 26: by Ian (new)

Ian Paganus ...and in a parallel celluloid universe, they all start singing "Tomorrow Belongs to Me":

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bs5bnV...

I honestly recalled this as being in TSOM, not Cabaret.


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