El's Reviews > The Corsican Bandit

The Corsican Bandit by Rebecca Stratton
Rate this book
Clear rating

by
83144
's review
Sep 28, 2008

did not like it
bookshelves: 20th-centurylit-late, corsica
Read in October, 2008

This is the first (and, assuredly, the last) Harlequin book I have read - and only because it takes place in Corsica did I even read it in the first place. Englishwoman Troy goes to Corsica to finish her grandfather's book about Corsican wildlife. Driving through the mountains she has a close encounter with some goats (probably the most realistic part of the entire book) and she meets the Italian, Lucien. He is dark and brooding and everything I imagine a Harlequin man to be. He has a nephew, Pietro, visiting from Rome as he is quite the little troublemaker and he does not want to go back. Both men have a thing for Troy and she is "discomfited" quite frequently (if it were a drinking game as to how many times "discomfited", "discomfiting", "discomfiture", etc. were used, I would probably still be drunk right now).

It's not so much that I expected this to be good, so I can not say that I am dissapointed. But really, it was incredibly bad. And I'm the first to review it here, so I wish I could write some spectacular review. But it really is just not worth it.
flag

Sign into Goodreads to see if any of your friends have read The Corsican Bandit.
Sign In »

Reading Progress

10/03/2008 page 82 "Cripes, this is the most ridiculous thing I have ever read..."

Comments (showing 1-3 of 3) (3 new)

dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by Rhonda (new)

Rhonda I hope you don't have any discomfiting moments on your trip! ;)



message 2: by El (new) - rated it 1 star

El Yes, it would be best for everyone if discomfiting moments are at a minimum - which is probably why I am not at all concerned with "night life"! :)

It's just... why couldn't the author mix it up a little? "Fluster", "Embarrass", "Confound" - these are all good words!

I suppose I'm just overthinking the whole thing, much like overthinking I Know Who Killed Me.


message 3: by Rhonda (new)

Rhonda I don't think a thesarus is allowed when writing a Harlequin novel.

Imagine if you had watched the "extended strip scene" from I Know Who Killed Me. Then there'd be even more to analyze!


back to top