Carl J.'s Reviews > Hollowland

Hollowland by Amanda Hocking
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May 28, 12

it was ok

I was surprised to actually find this book in my public library. I've heard about the A. Hocking phenomenon and thought, "What the hey. I'll give her another try." I'd tried to read her Trille trilogy and had to give up. Ridiculous. Liking zombies better, I figured time for a second shot.

I hated it. OK, maybe hate is too strong. I finished this book at least, so two points to Hocking for that. But, really, a lion? I mean, a lion?!! I was so distracted by that that I couldn't even concentrate on the rest, not that I really cared by that point. The characters were as hollow as her title. The plot was ridiculously contrived and the action boring at best. The story left me feeling lost and adrift. There was nothing to it, despite a promising beginning. But once she left her little safehouse in the desert, it was as if Hocking spliced together a dozen different plot pieces. She should've called this story Frankensteinland, because that's what it felt like.

Will I read the rest of the series? No.

I know Hocking has a trade contract and I'll give her another go then, because I think she can come up with some good stuff with a litle help behind her. But not this. This was a waste of time.
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Comments (showing 1-5 of 5) (5 new)

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Thomas I actually enjoyed Ripley and her presence in the story. What I couldn't understand why everyone was willing to help Remy in her quest to find Max.. especially Blue's assistance at the end of the book. WTF is that? Poor plot and character development.


Carl J. Thomas wrote: "I actually enjoyed Ripley and her presence in the story. What I couldn't understand why everyone was willing to help Remy in her quest to find Max.. especially Blue's assistance at the end of the b..."

Exactly, Thomas. Although, I suppose if the world belongs to zombies and the most pressing thing on your agenda is surviving, then I suppose going with a complete stranger through undead- and bandit-infested lands looks better than just sitting around. Maybe.

There are much better zombie books with real plots and characters.


message 3: by Brad (new) - rated it 1 star

Brad Savage It's very simple. Everyone willing to go out of their way and risk their lives to help Remy is an easy, cheap plot device. Hocking, as a writer, is as lazy as she is unskilled. And the lion? REALLY? The tame lion and the tame tigers took this book from being a bad, implausible narrative to being a bad, implausible cartoon. The best line about this book is in another review by another reader who said "at this point if the lion began to talk and lead our heroes to safety through a magic wardrobe, I wouldn't have even batted an eye." Sophomoric tripe. Pure sophomoric banal tripe.


message 4: by Bad (new) - rated it 1 star

Bad Clown I second Brad's comments. The lion was right out of a cartoon. Amanda has know idea how big cats, even "tame" ones, behave. Hocking is absolutely the LAZIEST writer I have ever read. NO character development, Emotionless and robotic narration, implausible situations and a host of cliches and bad syntax. I really think Hocking just published the first rough draft she churned out in one afternoon.


message 5: by Amber (new)

Amber Crank Hi fellow reviewers, I'm pretty sure this is young adult reading (not for crazy intelligent, overly analytical rocket scientists. It's fiction "fake" therefore how big cats normally act isn't really a concern! It's about taking the situation as the author imagines it and seeing how it plays out. BTW that would be "has no idea" not "know idea."


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