Andrea Hussey's Reviews > Tyger Tyger

Tyger Tyger by Kersten Hamilton
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May 10, 2012

it was ok

I was a little iffy about this book to begin with, because goblins and things like that seems a little juvenile. Granted, it is unique and a bit refreshing with all of the fads out now consisting of fairies and vampires and werewolves and all the other things that are popular.

It started out good. Teagan works at the zoo and likes rehabilitating injured animals, and I was all for that as an animal lover myself. But then it just got to where I really did not like it. She leaves the place with monkey crap, (oh god, don’t snap at me Teagan, I mean orangutan or w/e they were) on her shirt, and she stinks up the whole bus and people are staring at her which is totally disgusting. Then we go to this whole episode of her shrugging out the shirt and there’s some immature guys taping it and posting it on the internet because her shirt rode up. There’s some words and songs I have never heard of accompanying the video, and it’s just a little too stupid for my tastes.

There was a whole lot of stuff in there that went over my head, that I just did not understand why it was in there. Like quotes from novels and poems and things that just had no place. Then we’ve got the side character that has more of a personality than Teagan herself, her best friend Abby who is the typical Italian. Eventually she becomes overbearing and her personality is abrasive. She’s got cousins, the youngest who is in 9th grade, who are in the mafia and have all these connections that no normal high school kid would have. Their names, Raphael, Donatello, Michelangelo and Leonardo, instead of being named after the famous artists like I thought they were, are actually from the ninja turtles…like we’d all immediately think of fighting turtles instead of the famous artists. And they're known as the Turtles. That was just lame. I liked how they shortened their names because they were embarrassed of them and everything though.

When she first meets Finn she actually throws up, which was gross and majorly unexplained. Why would someone throw up when meeting their future love interest? Not the reaction I’d wanna have, that’s for sure. And it just went unexplained. I understand there’s chemistry between them, or electricity or whatever choice phrase the author chose to use, but throwing up was too extreme and disgusting. How about the old tried and true butterflies in your stomach or a racing heart? It’s been used a whole lot, but it goes a long way.

Another thing that I found highly annoying was that Finn and Teagan never got a minute alone. We had old in-your-face Abby guarding there every move thinking she knew everything about boys and could pass her knowledge onto Teagan, so she’s acting the chaperone to them every time they go off alone. And her little brother is also popping up all over the place, not giving them even half of a millisecond alone together. I wanted to punch someone or pull my hair out in frustration at their lack of progress BECAUSE EVERY TIME I TURNED AROUND SOMEONE WAS SHOWING UP RIGHT AT THE MOMENT THEY WERE ACTUALLY GETTING SOMEWHERE.

I don’t like teenagers playing the role of mothers. Her little brother was constantly there, and she had to play mom with him and take care of him, and then there was his mentally challenged friend who was peeing in his pants and just generally getting in the way.

The author spent more time developing the other characters than she did the main characters. Teagan came off as being almost a nonentity. She loves animals, and that’s about all I have on her. Any time someone said something she would immediately open her mouth and correct them in a scientific, know-it-all manner that grated on my nerves. Don’t dare call the orangutans monkeys or say something to contradict Mrs. Brainiac. Ugh, how boring. Poor Finn was always being corrected every time he opened his mouth. I'm really not sure what he even saw in her.

It was just on such a low level for me. The creatures were hard to picture, and everything was so lame. Small cats with bloated bellies that were oozing puss, and some weird creatures that I can barely picture in my mind because of the poor descriptions. The world they entered was just a complete mystery to me. I felt like that the author should have spent more time developing everything—the characters, the realm, the plot, everything.

The book was just all over the place. There were her mother’s paintings and her dad’s stories, and Abby’s family connections, and her brother’s songs, and all of this other crap that just contrasted so sharply and that made my head spin.

In nearly every paragraph we’ve got “I’m the MacCumhaill. I’m supposed to protect everyone, and I can’t get close to anyone because I’m going to live a short life.” We get it already, you’re the MacCumhaill. We don’t need to hear it every time you refer to yourself.

The Irish legend was unsatisfactorily explained. I found myself getting confused and I wanted to know more about his abilities and how if he was so talented at fending off the creatures why he was running from them and avoiding them instead of killing them outright. If he was so talented why did he have to use makeshift weapons?

Out of nowhere his grandmother says she’s the love of his heart or some other expression like that, when they hadn’t kissed or really gotten too close at all. I believe in taking things slow, not finding out he already loves her, and from another person to boot! Let the words come from Finn for the first time, not his grandma for god’s sakes!

I liked how he busted out of the room completely naked and wielding a knife to save them, because he had taking a shower. After it’s over his grandmother says to put clothes on because he’s just embarrassing himself. Aiden comments on how red they both turned, and I thought that was funny and sweet. There were other sweet conversations and scenes in the book, but there weren’t enough to redeem all the bad qualities.
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