Bree T's Reviews > Sunrise Point

Sunrise Point by Robyn Carr
Rate this book
Clear rating

by
3913428
's review
May 10, 12

bookshelves: arc, contemporary, kindle-version, netgalley, romance, series, women-s-fiction
Read on May 03, 2012

Nora Crane has done it tough most of her life. An unsympathetic, often narcissistic mother, an absent father and then a boyfriend who left her abandoned with two young children in a house without proper heating or even sealed windows in the middle of winter in a place in the middle of no where called Virgin River. Nora is used to making a go of it on her own, she’s used to struggling. She wishes she had better opportunities for herself and her children and she’s prepared to work for them. What she wasn’t prepared for, was the way the town of Virgin River opened its arms to her when they found out about her struggles. After her mostly absent boyfriend was arrested and carted off to jail, the town realised just how dire Nora’s situation was and they rolled up with help sealing up her windows, babysitting offers for her two young girls, a part time job at the local clinic and general friendship and support. After a long time without one, Nora begins to find herself seeing Virgin River as home.

She spots a flier advertising jobs at the Cavanaugh Apple Orchard, a few miles out. She’s determined to go and apply, as the money and hours are good. There’s a daycare opening at the soon-to-be-completed school and she’ll be eligible for a reduced rate. Even though she’s slight, she’s used to carrying a 10 month old around all day and she’s convinced that she won’t have much trouble picking and lugging apples all day. The owner of the orchard, Tom Cavanaugh, isn’t too sure. He fails to see how a young, pretty, delicate-looking lady like Nora is cut out for this job and he turns her down flat. Luckily for Nora, his grandmother sees her potential and her determination and insists that Tom give her a job.

Nora works hard and comes to win Tom’s trust and admiration, especially when he learns of her circumstances. As she picks apples throughout the season, the two of them find themselves becoming closer and closer, even though Tom has very clear ideas about the sort of woman he would like to make Mrs Cavanaugh. They don’t include a single mother of two, no matter how attractive he finds her and how much he comes to enjoy her spirit and even like her two small daughters.

If Nora definitely isn’t his type…then how come he can’t get her out of his head? How come she’s all he thinks about, even when he’s with someone else?

Sunrise Point is the 19th installment of the Virgin River series and the most recently published title. A couple of books ago we were introduced to Nora, a woman in her early 20s who was down on her luck with two small children to look after. In the previous book we were given a passing introduction to Tom Cavanaugh when Jack greeted him like he’d been popping in and out of the whole series the whole time, when he’d actually just returned from several years away from the town, as (what else?) a serviceman, stationed overseas. He’s returned to take over the reins of his family apple orchard – his grandmother, his only other family is getting on a bit and she can’t handle the picking season alone anymore, even if she is extremely sprightly and energetic for her age. A long time ago she was given a chance by a family and she ‘pays it forward’ by seeing something in Nora and giving her exactly the same chance.

I admired the heck out of Nora – she might possibly be my favourite Virgin River female since Ellie Baldwin in #9, Forbidden Falls. She had known hardship almost her entire life and had been left in Virgin River to fend for herself with no money and no possessions. I admired her tenacity and determined spirit and the way she was ready to do anything that meant she’d have a little bit of money for herself and her girls to start towards a better life. She walked to the orchard (about 3.4miles from memory) to start just after sunrise and worked hard and then walked home. She sacrificed a lot of time with them in order to support them and as a mother of children similar in ages to Nora’s (hers are 2 and 9 or 10 months, mine are 3 and nearly 8 months) I appreciated just how enormous that sacrifice was. She was scarred by the things that had happened to her, which made her slow to accept help or to re-establish contact with someone from her past who she had lost touch with, but I understood that. She was protecting herself and her children, which was very important to her.

I didn’t like Tom quite as much – well I did at first, but several things he did and said over the course of the book irritated me just a little. I didn’t appreciate his attitude towards Nora being a single mother, as though to be involved with someone in her situation was unpalatable and I didn’t like the shallow way in which he went about dating someone in order to find a wife. It didn’t reflect well on him and it wasn’t really what I expected.

This book did differ in most, if not all of the previous ones I’ve read in that the romance was definitely a much slower ban. The two main characters don’t even kiss until about 75% of the way through the book, whereas mostly the attractions are quite quick and the relations begin a lot sooner! This felt fresh, quite different, in that it didn’t take that path which is I think, quite true to Nora’s character. I do like how Tom was pretty much forced to reassess his prejudices in the end.
Likeflag

Sign into Goodreads to see if any of your friends have read Sunrise Point.
Sign In »

No comments have been added yet.