Prashant's Reviews > The Story of an Hour and Other Stories

The Story of an Hour and Other Stories by Kate Chopin
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Apr 06, 12

bookshelves: e-book
Read in April, 2012

I am simply baffled after reading this story. It left me with more questions then I would have ever liked to ponder.

These are the kind of questions we live with our whole lives. Some just give up the hope and many others die trying to find the answer.

--> Was she really happy that her husband was dead or was it her hysterical answer to the absurdity of the situation?

--> Did she really have only these fleeting moments when she loved her husband or was she trying to make the situation less painful for herself?

--> Can we really love someone or is it just(as the story says) the desire to overpower and control someone else that drives us to it?

--> Long years of being together, was she really looking forward to the life alone, with all the freedom and will to do anything she desired to?

--> Does she die of the sudden happiness or simply the shock of reliving the same life that for an hour she had assumed is left long behind her?

Please read the story here and see if you have the answers to these questions :)
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Comments (showing 1-8 of 8) (8 new)

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Kritika Swarup "of joy that kills"...interesting!!
My take would be, it was neither happiness nor a hysterical response, rather a logical explanation drawn with the intense desire to accept the fact in the light of atleast some hope. What follows is an attempt to make look small her entire life sketch by posing questions over her love.
The ending sure takes her life..after all, the joy, unlike sorrow, wouldn't need absorbing it to manifest its nasty play with a weak heart!!


Prashant That's good to know. This means joy is more fatal to our health than sorrow. It sounds just right!


message 3: by Kritika (last edited Apr 06, 2012 03:18AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Kritika Swarup Prashant wrote: "That's good to know. This means joy is more fatal to our health than sorrow. It sounds just right!"

Or maybe, the fact that the expression of the joy was too loud to have demanded more clarity! (and thus the effect)


Prashant Kritika wrote:
Or maybe, the fact that the expression of the joy was too loud to have demanded..."


Don't you think that the expression of joy is always way louder than that of sorrow. Most of the time that's what leads to regrets in life!


Kritika Swarup Prashant wrote: "Kritika wrote:
Or maybe, the fact that the expression of the joy was too loud to have demanded..."

Don't you think that the expression of joy is always way louder than that of sorrow. Most of the ..."


I disagree with the '"most" of the time regret' part. Sometimes maybe.


Susan Dillon Mrs. Mallard was shocked and disappointed that the freedom she anticipated during her widowhood was no longer hers. Her family misinterpreted her death as the shock of joy.


message 7: by Rosemary (new)

Rosemary The woman does love her husband in some ways but suffers under the burden of having her life restricted because she is married. She has not been able to express her true self or do as she wishes. This may be as much on account of social customs and expectations as anything else. Her husband may be totally unaware that in taking the usual male privileges he is in any way responsible for suppressing her desires and causing her unhappiness, but he is. When she learns that her husband is dead, the words "free, free" come almost unbidden as though she realizes for the first time that she can be an autonomous human being. She settles into this new feeling and experiences pleasure, hugging her sister with joy. When her husband, very much alive, walks into the house, the woman screams in shock and confusion, with pain that her freedom is being torn away, and perhaps with the joy of escaping through death herself. Having found her full freedom, she can not go back to anything less. Her heart, physically and spiritually, can't bear it. She has become fully conscious and it is not now possible for her to return to an unenlightened state.


Kritika Swarup Rosemary wrote: "The woman does love her husband in some ways but suffers under the burden of having her life restricted because she is married. She has not been able to express her true self or do as she wishes. T..."
Very beautifully put Rosemary!!


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