Darlene's Reviews > Milkshake

Milkshake by Joanna Weiss
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Apr 10, 12

bookshelves: parenting, mothers, breastfeeding, favs, feminism, adult, about-children, about-infants, humor, kindle, political, strong-fem, womyn
Recommended to Darlene by: A Kindle freebie
Recommended for: Yvensong, S. Michele, Cheryl in CC NV and other women mothers or not
Read from April 05 to 10, 2012, read count: Once but may read it again.

This is a fun and educational read so far. The author takes a controversial subject, breastfeeding, and through her plot and characters shows the various points of view, while keeping it light. Don't worry, those who know me, I will have a huge "review" when I finish reading this delightful book.

*****

This book doesn't let up! That's a good thing. There are no stones left unturned. All aspects of womanhood are addressed, none being perfect, none being wrong. I don't know how Joanna Weiss did it. Maybe by calling this "Chick Lit?" Fem-lit works better for me. This addresses deep issues women face from the time they consider themselves adult. The main issues are those of guilt, shame, and lack of self confidence. As a new mom you are bathed in those issues and may not even know it. But our main character, Lauren, in Milkshake represents those insecurities.

Don't get me wrong, this is far from a downer. As Lauren battles the new mom issues, her life is taken over by others who are stronger and manipulative. But Lauren shows she does have her own mind and sees things differently than those who would use her.

Ugh! This still sounds like a debbie-downer. It is funny! It hits on all the points of view, bottle versus breast, breast ownership, art, politics, very political, Earth-mothers versus career-ladder-climbers. Ok, still not sounding as enjoyable as the book actually was.

Actually, that is what I am trying to say: this book takes deep subjects and lightens them to help us to see the wisdom in our choices is far from the wisdom of others, but the choices are equally valid.

This book has very little romance, YAY! Yet women are portrayed with needs and desires and they face the changing world and political climate, while maintaining her own goals... HOW did you write this, Ms. Weiss? Amazing!

I am Earth-mom. Natural everything. SAHM. Now at 62, I see one important thing I left out: Care of my future self. Even this issue is brought up in the book. As a SAHM you are not putting anything away for yourself. Keep that in mind, young mothers. I'm on disability, not with the father of my children, nor my adult children. The money I have to survive on is so minimal. I wish I would have had someone to address that with me while I was cleaning up spit-up, changing diapers and chasing children: What will there be for me to fall back on? Society had me convinced that I was doing my best for my children. That I was saving money for my little family and offering some sort of stability. That sort of means nothing as I now choose whether I need meds more than more beans and rice. Young moms look out for your future selves as much if not more than you do that little one in your arms. Just my word to the wise. Nothing else would I have changed of my early motherhood. I loved, still love my offspring (they do get upset when I use the word child/children), I love that we had a great chance to bond. But now I see there were other ways of mothering and all ways have their good points and bad points. Being a womyn means more compromise than MAN has even had to consider. Much of the above is brought out in Milkshake. There are a lot of issues we still need to work out to have an equal status between men and fem. But while I SAHMed, my ex-husband collects quite the handsome retirement while having given little to actual care of the beings he wanted and created with me, meanwhile it was my all-consuming role. Looking at it from this end of life, Love isn't enough to live on.

I would love to see what others have to say about the book and the essentials of being XX chromosomes.


Oh, and a side-note: I read this using my text-to-speech on. That means words like breastfeeding became brEEstfeeding and breastfed became brEEst(f)ed. So not only did I have many LOL moments from the author's point of view, I enjoyed the robot-talk, too!
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Reading Progress

04/08/2012
55.0%

Comments (showing 1-5 of 5) (5 new)

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message 1: by S. (new) - added it

S. Your comments are well laid out and the book is definitely *not* a downer. I am seeing the main character being manipulated, and am very worried about her. But there are already glimmers that she is aware of this manipulation by others, and I have faith that she will eventually do something about it. I relate to her much more than I do her best friend, who I think is a bit of a user just as much as is the candidate in the story. It's fast paced and well put-together. I'm about halfway through! Will say more when I get to the end. lol Spot on with your comments about your own life, as well. I find myself pretty worried about financial futures, since I don't have disability and no retirement from spending so many years doing foster care. Why did no one ever tell me that there was no "plan" for foster parents to retire? Ah, well...guess I should have figured it out, eh? And the SAHM thing I would not change, either, though I did get to work outside the home here and there as the kids got older and I could find jobs that were night shifty so dad was home while I was not. Anyway, society/the world needs to take the whole mothering thing much more seriously so that mothers will be better off once the children are well raised. Latch-key kids have too many problems to face and they need a parent at home to help them navigate life. Never mind...a rant coming on is not a good thing for a book critique. lol Thanks for your review! Off to read a bit more before turning in.


message 2: by S. (new) - added it

S. Although, if a book really makes one think, it is a success...whether you agree with it or not. At least you're thinking. lol


Darlene S. wrote: "Although, if a book really makes one think, it is a success...whether you agree with it or not. At least you're thinking. lol"

The good part of this book is that is does present all sides with little judgement. Laugh and learn LAL!


Darlene S. wrote: "Your comments are well laid out and the book is definitely *not* a downer. I am seeing the main character being manipulated, and am very worried about her. But there are already glimmers that she i..."
Somehow I missed this longer critique and responded only to the shorter one. Yeah, I know I am not the only one at this end of life questioning how we could have been better prepared while doing what we thought best for our families. My own mom didn't work outside the home much when we were kids, she took in foster kids, yet I didn't hear her tell me to prepare. When she finally got with a financial planner before retirement, she was led to a job with social security and told how long she needed to work before she could retire. But midway through this plan is when she got pancreatic cancer and didn't get to 'see' the fruit of her employment.

This is a huge issue and so far I see no easy answers.


Darlene S. wrote: "Your comments are well laid out and the book is definitely *not* a downer. I am seeing the main character being manipulated, and am very worried about her. But there are already glimmers that she i..."
Somehow I missed this longer critique and responded only to the shorter one. Yeah, I know I am not the only one at this end of life questioning how we could have been better prepared while doing what we thought best for our families. My own mom didn't work outside the home much when we were kids, she took in foster kids, yet I didn't hear her tell me to prepare. When she finally got with a financial planner before retirement, she was led to a job with social security and told how long she needed to work before she could retire. But midway through this plan is when she got pancreatic cancer and didn't get to 'see' the fruit of her employment.

This is a huge issue and so far I see no easy answers.


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