Lisa Vegan's Reviews > And Both Were Young

And Both Were Young by Madeleine L'Engle
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Jul 14, 07

bookshelves: orphaned-and-quasi-orphaned-kids, reviewed, fiction, novel, childrens, young-adult, school-story
Recommended for: L’Engle fans who might have missed this one, if lost mother young/boarding school experience
Read in June, 2007

Not my favorite L’Engle but still worth reading. About a teenage girl whose mother has died who gets sent to a Swiss boarding school and her adjustment to her new life: her relationships with a new boy, her teachers & fellow students at the school, her father and his girlfriend. I love L’Engle’s flawed but gifted girl characters. A lot here that rang true, especially how an adolescent girl might feel when a father dates after the mother dies.

Important to read the reissue with Madeleine L’Engle’s poignant note about how when she originally published this book, writing about death and sex had to be toned down, and how with the edition reissued/published in the 1980s she was able to make it more as she’d originally envisioned.
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Comments (showing 1-8 of 8) (8 new)

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message 1: by [deleted user] (new)

Hello! I see this says "not your favorite L'Engle." I love Madeleine L'Engle but have only read the Time sequence and some of the Austin family chronicles. Can I please have your recommendation of which stand alone to begin with? Thanks!


Lisa Vegan Ariel, Well, I do like this one. Just not as much as A Wrinkle in Time or Meet the Austins. I recommend this one if you enjoy a good boarding school story. Her only other stand alone that comes to mind, that I also enjoyed, is Camilla. Neither are science fiction; both are realistic stories.


message 3: by CLM (new) - rated it 5 stars

CLM And Both Were Young is my very favorite. I remember I was reading it while my mother was in the hospital having my younger sister and my grandmother took it away from me to make me go to bed! Not that I hold a grudge or anything... I bet I have read it 50 times since that night.


Lisa Vegan CLM wrote: "Not that I hold a grudge or anything"

Funny!

How old were you, Constance?


Emily I didn't know about the revised edition. Now of course I'm wondering which one I read. This probably is my favorite L'Engle, but then I do have a thing for boarding school stories.


Lisa Vegan Emily wrote: "I didn't know about the revised edition. Now of course I'm wondering which one I read. This probably is my favorite L'Engle, but then I do have a thing for boarding school stories."

My favorites remain the books introduced to me when I was nine years old, standalone books at the time: Meet the Austins and A Wrinkle in Time. (these covers!!! I love my covers.)

I love boarding school stories too and I liked this book a lot, especially the revised version, which is the versionMadeleine L'Engle envisioned but which the publishers didn't let her write. More honesty about sex and death, particularly death, and second marriages/stepmothers too. When I first read it my mother had already died and I think I'd already had a stepmother for a brief time, and the original version just didn't resonate with me, but the revised edition really did.

Emily, What year(s) did you read this? Do you remember? Knowing that might help you figure out which edition(s) you've read.


Emily I want to say 1982. I do know it was a paperback, so that suggests it was probably the revised edition.


Lisa Vegan Emily wrote: "I want to say 1982. I do know it was a paperback, so that suggests it was probably the revised edition."

I hope so. I think it was much better, although I know at least one Goodreader who liked the original better.


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