Maria Kramer's Reviews > Robopocalypse

Robopocalypse by Daniel H. Wilson
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In the future, robots are everywhere, making human life safer and easier...until researchers create an AI called Archos that becomes too intelligent. Archos deems humanity a risk to the life of the planet and unleashes swarms of domestic and military robots to bring humanity down to more manageable levels. This is the story of those humans who fought back.

As far as apocalypses go, the robot apocalypse is a classic, tapping into our fundamental unease about being dependent on technologies we don't fully comprehend. And this book certainly brings the gore and the action -- robots are chopping people up and crushing faces left and right. The story loses some of its disaster-movie punch, however, by choosing to go the "World War Z" route and hop between a large cast of geographically diverse characters. Although I liked seeing the Osage Nation and an elderly Otaku workto end the robot revolution in completely different ways, I felt I never got to know any one of them enough to really care about the terrible things that happen to them. Some of the characterization of Archos and the Freeborn robots also struck me as uneven. I know it's hard to write from the point of view of a robot, but Mr. Wilson, that's what you chose to do. So don't just give me some half-assed characterization, ok? Still, I can see why this was an Alex Award winner -- I'm sure teens will eat it up. This one's going on my summer reading booktalk list for sure.

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