Aubrey's Reviews > The Hunger Games

The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins
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Jul 23, 14

bookshelves: young-adult, 2-star, reviewed, reality-check, r-2012, my-lifetime
Read on March 29, 2012

This is one of those books that I read so that I'd have the experience to back up my opinions on a series that has been hyped up to a ridiculous extent. I have to say, I didn't have to work at all at being unimpressed. The idea wasn't all that novel, the writing was mostly telling instead of showing, and wasn't even that good to boot. Too many awkward phrasings and grammatical errors. And maybe it was the lack of description and minimal emotional conveyance, but Katniss' narration was very underdeveloped, in that she wasn't nearly as angry or scared or mindful of her horrible situation as she should have been. Peeta seemed to have more complexity to him, but it's unsure how long that will last. And the rest of the characters barely get five pages to them before disappearing forever, so it's near impossible to judge them. I know it's YA, but I've read much better YA. If you want a dystopia, go read The Giver or something. Much better use of your time.
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Comments (showing 1-21 of 21) (21 new)

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Alice X. Zhang Couldn't possibly agree more. And yes... The Giver managed to be much more frightening and dystopian with a far less violent and deus-ex-machina concept.


Aubrey Alice wrote: "Couldn't possibly agree more. And yes... The Giver managed to be much more frightening and dystopian with a far less violent and deus-ex-machina concept."

At least it's getting a movie of it's own. That'll garner more readers, whatever the quality of the movie.


Jonathan Fair enough, although I personally couldn't stand the Giver. I liked the idea but it seemed so pseudo-spiritual new age and I'm not into that kind of book...
I did read this before the hype too. Otherwise I would have been like...'it's alright'


Aubrey If it was completely up to me, I'd have children reading Brave New World. But you know. Kids these days. And their parents.


Jonathan Children and Brave New World hmmm...I doubt they'd get it. But it's certainly true dystopian and much better than this.

I just like the ideas in this book really...and the series.


message 6: by Scribble (last edited Oct 26, 2012 06:16AM) (new) - added it

Scribble Orca Aubrey wrote: "If it was completely up to me, I'd have children reading Brave New World. But you know. Kids these days. And their parents."

+1

BNW is dystopia to end all dystopia. Because people actually thought it was utopia. That is the definition of dystopia.

And kids aren't given the chance to 'get it' if they are handed pap like THG as the definition of dystopia.


Jonathan 1984 is also brilliant dystopia. But it's different in its own way. I mean that kids won't get the sexuality of BNW hahaha. It's still got a lot of adult content...

Yeah I dislike that marketing turned THG into what is known as dystopian. It's entertaining, I liked the ideas and it's very semi-dystopian but it's not dystopian like the classics.


message 8: by Scribble (last edited Oct 26, 2012 06:12AM) (new) - added it

Scribble Orca Jonathan wrote: "1984 is also brilliant dystopia. But it's different in its own way. I mean that kids won't get the sexuality of BNW hahaha. It's still got a lot of adult content...

Yeah I dislike that marketing ..."


Agree with you on both points - but given the level of sexualisation of kids as well as the level of sexuality present in what currently passes for YA, I'm not sure that they wouldn't understand the dynamics between BNW's pneumatic anti-heroine and John.


Jocelyn I can't agree more. The writing is atrocious, the narration inconsistent and underdeveloped, and Katniss doesn't act like a normal human being. I mean, what kind of crazy person analyzes the height of a fire when they are running for their lives? Collins fails on almost every single level when trying to evoke emotion into her writing. (view spoiler) Blah. I didn't care in the slightest at all of what was happening.


message 10: by Aubrey (last edited Oct 26, 2012 11:18AM) (new) - rated it 2 stars

Aubrey Jonathan wrote: "1984 is also brilliant dystopia. But it's different in its own way. I mean that kids won't get the sexuality of BNW hahaha. It's still got a lot of adult content...

Yeah I dislike that marketing ..."


1984 is brilliantly thought out. But that's the thing. You have to think about it and input it and go through all the trouble of keeping all of humanity under your thumb. Humans are lazy, pleasure seeking creatures. If you give them the option between 1984 and BNW, even if in both you are put in the highest position of power, BNW will usually win. Chances are, if you included real life as an option, the majority of people would still be attracted to BNW. And there's the horror of it.
As to whether kids would get the sex bits, in this day and age, it wouldn't require nearly as much explanation as adults would like to believe.


Jonathan Aubrey wrote: "Jonathan wrote: "1984 is also brilliant dystopia. But it's different in its own way. I mean that kids won't get the sexuality of BNW hahaha. It's still got a lot of adult content...

Yeah I dislik..."


It depends on the kids. I know a lot of innocent kids who wouldn't really get it and I know a few who would completely understand. The majority of 12 year olds I know wouldn't really get it. The majority of 14 year olds are more likely to but I don't know whether they'd grab or get the philosophy.


message 12: by Scribble (new) - added it

Scribble Orca Aubrey wrote: "1984 is brilliantly thought out. But that's the thing. You have to think about it and input it and go through all the trouble of keeping all of humanity under your thumb. Humans are lazy, pleasure seeking creatures. If you give them the option between 1984 and BNW, even if in both you are put in the highest position of power, BNW will usually win. Chances are, if you included real life as an option, the majority of people would still be attracted to BNW. And there's the horror of it.
As to whether kids would get the sex bits, in this day and age, it wouldn't require nearly as much explanation as adults would like to believe."


Aubrey, I'm confused. Do you mean to write THG for BNW here? I wouldn't exalt 1984 over BNW at all - rather see both read, in fact. And I don't think BNW is an easier read - quite the contrary. 1984 is obviously what it purports to be, but BNW received praise because people interpreted it as being an ideal world. I think that message is far more subtle.


Aubrey Jonathan wrote: "Aubrey wrote: "Jonathan wrote: "1984 is also brilliant dystopia. But it's different in its own way. I mean that kids won't get the sexuality of BNW hahaha. It's still got a lot of adult content......"

It does depend on the kids, and the amount of effort put into teaching it. So when push comes to shove, my initial choice of The Giver still stands.

Scribble wrote: "Aubrey wrote: "1984 is brilliantly thought out. But that's the thing. You have to think about it and input it and go through all the trouble of keeping all of humanity under your thumb. Humans are ..."

I would also like to see both of them read, but my personal opinion is that BNW the better of the two. This is in terms of showing people who understand it that that the path to dystopia is a much slippier slope than they might have imagined. 1984's very well crafted, and we do have CCTV and all, but it isn't for the reasons that the novel puts out.
Also, I guess I wasn't being clear about the choice thing. I was saying that if people were given the choice to choose a lifestyle, from either 1984 or BNW, they'd go with BNW almost every time. Not which book that they'd choose to read. In that case, I'd think people would go more for 1984, since it's more well known and has had more impact on what a society's idea of a dystopia consists of.


Jonathan I think 1984's realistic in depicting the version of dystopian reality as we understand it in history. I mean it really parodies what happens in totalitarian societies. I sadly do think people would pick the reality of BNW. In fact I see elements of that world infiltrating modern life where people and elements in the world are treated like consumer goods to 'be had'.


message 15: by Scribble (last edited Oct 27, 2012 03:57AM) (new) - added it

Scribble Orca Keely's review of the Giver hasn't inspired me to add it to my TBR list.

Aubrey, I think your appraisal of which book would be chosen (for the wrong reasons) for lifestyle is correct, and as a definition of dystopia it would be 1984, because the alternative ie BNW would be too confrontational to consider.


Cecily "I didn't have to work at all at being unimpressed"
LOL
You got it in one.


Aubrey It's true. I had the vague worry that I might actually like it and thus become a hypocrite in light of my previous assumptions, but lucky for me that didn't happen.


Sentimental Surrealist The world has yet to give me any reason to read this, even with the Hype in mind.


Aubrey You say that like it's a bad thing.


message 20: by Sue (new)

Sue Aubrey I feel you have done my investigative work for me when it comes to this book. Thank you, thank you!!


Aubrey Ha ha, you're welcome, Sue. Go devote your attention to something far worthier of it.


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