Nilesh Kashyap's Reviews > The Hunger Games

The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins
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Dec 03, 13

bookshelves: dystopian
Read from March 26 to 27, 2012

My ‘The Hunger Games’ week
23rd march- movie is released
24th march- I read this review and end up watching excellent trailers, Later I downloaded the excerpt and kind of liked the first chapter
25th march- I am a proud owner of the book. Yay!
26th to 27th march- I started reading the book
This is how I thought it would go:
Once I would start reading it, I would just be sucked into it and finish the book remaining awake until early hours of morning, with my bloodshot red eyes.
This is how it went:
I started it and was immediately sucked into the book but then around midway I started losing interest. I fell asleep and had horrible dream (credit to graphic violence). Next morning I finished it owning to its fast pace.
This book is special:
This is my first dystopian novel. I was very much excited about it since it was my introduction to a new genre. I would like to thank this book for such amazing description of dystopian world.

The book:
This is a kind of book which probably everyone has read including their dogs, cats and birds too!
So there is no need to hide the spoilers but as warning-
**SPOILERS AHEAD**
This book started brilliantly and within few pages sucked me into it. The world building part is brilliant. Introduction to districts, new society, people’s life, the rules, the reaping, and yes ‘The hunger Games’. It is fast paced with simplistic writing. These are all good things. The best part kids are starting to read the books.
But that’s where the good things end.
Suzanne Collins created the opportunity (golden ones) and one by one she destroyed it. But still most of the people are enthralled by the book as it eventually came out. But I’m not.
So I’m going to tell very explicitly what I didn’t like...

Using the first person perspective and thus losing the chance to give depth to any character
This story has been told through the eyes of Katniss Everdeen, she just doesn't give a damn about anyone else except her family so naturally the other characters are too shallow and one dimensional.
Many people just love Peeta and Katniss but I don’t like either of them. All I knew about Peeta was that he liked Katniss from age of five, saved her twice and is now in love with Katniss, rest is mystery.
About Katniss, she does a lot of thing (infact she does everything in the book) but never has a second thought about them, never reflect over what she has done, eventually no attachment with the character.
People tend to like Rue, Peeta, Cinna because these are few characters that spent time with Katniss, but (again)no character has depth.
One more outcome that I feel from other reviews is that Katniss is definitely heroine of the story but why make other 10 kids villain. While Cato and Clove make their kill they become monster but when Katniss makes her kill, it has to be justified as revenge for killing Rue and pity killing of Cato.
This book is all about KATNISS, KATNISS and KATNISS...

Very predictable plot
The plot is so much predictable that I was surprised after every 10 or 20 pages (I’m not out of my mind) because the story would turn out exactly how I would guess. First I thought that maybe my mind is highly synchronised with Collins’s mind but later on reading other reviews it turned out the plot was predictable.

Missed opportunities
This could have been much more interesting novel. Where did it all go wrong? As I’m writing, everything wrong in story to me looks like is outcome of first person perspective.
--I would have felt much more connected to the games had it contained a bit of background information of every important tributes. Despite the killings being graphical, I didn’t felt sad for their deaths.
--When Katniss makes her first kill, she moves over to do other things (because Rue is dying). But later when she realises that it was her first kill, still she doesn’t reflect over it even for a minute. Killing other human has effect on the killer, until and unless killer is sociopath, moreover here the killers are kids. Instead of giving insight to their mind the story flatly moves ahead with killing and ending the games.

It doesn’t make me think
I read books because I enjoy it and because they push my mind to a new level of thinking which benefit me. This book made me think only about, why I didn’t like this book when whole world is enjoying this. No further thoughts beyond that.

Maciek’s thought on this book:
“The Hunger Games reads like a bag of chips, meaning you can devour it in several short bites but it will leave you unnourished and aside from gas, it won’t have much effect.”

FOR ALL THIS 2 STARS(**)
In many reviews people come out with most lame excuse (defense) I have ever heard- IT’s A YOUNG-ADULT NOVEL
As for other books in the series, I will definitely read them but I’m not in hurry or excited with this prospect. I will read it someday, probably before second installment of the movie.

To put a perfect end to ‘The Hunger Games’ week
28th march- I watched the movie
Movie turned out pretty good, much better than I had anticipated. As I watched the movie it seemed that novel was written with movie in mind. Few minor changes, like in the end President Snow shown thinking representing its start of story unlike novel which ends. Some scenes are breath taking, too much violence. Acting by Jennifer Lawrence is good (she turned out better than Katniss in the book). I liked the movie, rated it 7/10.

This review is inspired by Maciek’s review and Brian’s review.
P.S. The kind of reviews and comments I have seen makes me think this book is being followed like religion and my review will sound like blasphemy to them. But I can’t help it, I tried to be honest.
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Comments (showing 1-50 of 66) (66 new)


Maciek I am glad you enjoyed my review so much and that it inspired you to write your own, Nilesh! I agree with what you say. I thought that none of the characters was particularly likeable or relatable, and I was really annoyed by Katniss. Maybe it gets better in the later two books, but I don't think I'll read them, at least not soon. I also agree that the book has gained a following which is almost religious in nature. Maybe the newly released movie will be better than the book?


Shayantani Das I read this book 3 years back and although I remember liking it, I don’t remember many of the detail. That just proves that you are right!
Still, don’t let this bad experience turn you off dystopia. There are so many stunning novels in the genre.


Aryn In many reviews people come out with most lame excuse (defense) I have ever heard- IT’s A YOUNG-ADULT NOVEL

I hate, hate, hate that excuse. Young Adult novels can still be good and socially valid. Just because they're aimed at a younger crowd doesn't mean they have to be less intelligent or not as good. /rant.

I really did enjoy your review. Agreed with you on a lot of it. I am curious to see the movie, and eventually read the other 2 books, but not curious enough to buy them in hardcover.


Srinivas same thing happened to me..


Nilesh Kashyap Maciek wrote: "I am glad you enjoyed my review so much and that it inspired you to write your own, Nilesh! I agree with what you say. I thought that none of the characters was particularly likeable or relatable, ..."

Rarely I find negative review of this book. When I didn't liked this book, first I thought something is wrong with me, then I read your review. As for movie, I enjoyed it more than book, hopefully you will like it too.


Nilesh Kashyap Tanu wrote: "I read this book 3 years back and although I remember liking it, I don’t remember many of the detail. That just proves that you are right!
Still, don’t let this bad experience turn you off dystop..."


It was good in depicting dystopian world, what I didn't like were characters. I already have 1984 and Lord of the Flies waiting on my shelf, perhaps they will make it up.


Nilesh Kashyap Aryn wrote: "In many reviews people come out with most lame excuse (defense) I have ever heard- IT’s A YOUNG-ADULT NOVEL

I hate, hate, hate that excuse. Young Adult novels can still be good and socially valid..."


I am glad you enjoyed the review and AGREED too.


Kaethe But later when she realises that it was her first kill, still she doesn’t reflect over it even for a minute.

That didn't bother me in the context of the story, because, of course, she is fighting for her life, and people in combat situations do not usually take time to wallow in reflection. You might well enjoy the second book more, when Katniss really does have some time and opportunity to think about what is going on around her.


Marie I love your review. It's honest and I appreciate that. I had trouble continuing the series because of the characters. I still haven't finished it because of the how I find the characters so distant. Just giving you positive words on your review. It's a great review! :)


message 10: by s.penkevich (new)

s.penkevich Hey great review. I find it hard to trust most review out there for this book, but this one seemed to be honest and to the point. I guess I should just read it and see for myself, but I from what you've said, I should probably skip it.


Nilesh Kashyap s.penkevich wrote: "Hey great review. I find it hard to trust most review out there for this book, but this one seemed to be honest and to the point. I guess I should just read it and see for myself, but I from what y..."

Thanks S., Since you are reading Ulysses I would never ever recommend this book, instead you should just watch the movie. But if you want to see for yourself- go for it, it is very quick read.
There is some kind of wave which i don't recognize, first Harry Potter then Twilight now this, God knows what next. Btw have you read twilight.


Nilesh Kashyap Kaethe wrote: "But later when she realises that it was her first kill, still she doesn’t reflect over it even for a minute.

That didn't bother me in the context of the story, because, of course, she is fighting..."


I agree that she is fighting for her life, and people in combat situations do not usually take time to wallow in reflection, but I'm not asking her to delve into matter of life and death and explain like Tolstoy. I just wanted to know how she mentally prepared herself from killing rabbit and squirrel to killing human, few lines maybe a paragraph would have done. But all Collins write about is that Katniss like stew, Cinna dresses her beautifully etc. to get sponsor. Sponsors help but they are not going to come to kill the tributes.


Nilesh Kashyap Marie wrote: "I love your review. It's honest and I appreciate that. I had trouble continuing the series because of the characters. I still haven't finished it because of the how I find the characters so distant..."

Thanks Marie, and yes superficial characters kill the interest, but it is worse when one of those characters is the narrator of the story.


Kaethe I do understand why the book didn't work for you, and I'm sorry, just because I want everyone to love every book they read (and toss the ones they don't). Maybe the older dystopias would be a better fit, like 1984 or The Lathe of Heaven orBrave New World.


Joselito Honestly and Brilliantly I think this is rather a dystrophic novel, i.e., one written by an author with defective nutrition. Vision was affected due to insufficient vitamin E, thus her short-sighted treatment of her characters.


Kaethe Joselito wrote: "I think this is rather a dystrophic novel, i.e., one written by an author with defective nutrition. Vision was affected due to insufficient vitamin E, thus her short-sighted treatment of her charac..."

I disagree, but Joselito, that's brilliant!


Nilesh Kashyap Joselito wrote: "I think this is rather a dystrophic novel, i.e., one written by an author with defective nutrition. Vision was affected due to insufficient vitamin E, thus her short-sighted treatment of her charac..."

LOL! You have found the ultimate fault in the novel. Brilliant thought and well said Joselito.


Joselito Honestly and Brilliantly Thank you both Kaethe and Nilesh. And remember; I could be right too. What do we know what Collins eat everyday? Her favorite food? Could there be some significance with the fact that she chose the word "hunger" to describe the games and in her book's title? And why is it that Katniss never seemed to have eaten anything throughout the story? Dystopia or dystrophy? The mystery deepens...


message 19: by s.penkevich (new)

s.penkevich Nilesh wrote: "s.penkevich wrote: "Hey great review. I find it hard to trust most review out there for this book, but this one seemed to be honest and to the point. I guess I should just read it and see for mysel..."

Hey, sorry for the very delayed response.
I have not read any Twilight, i've been trying to avoid it. I glanced at it about a year ago and thought the writing seemed bland so I didn't bother.
Ha, i was saying in another thread that I hope the next craze is robot love dramas, as long as the robots are cheesy 80s B-film types.


Nilesh Kashyap Joselito wrote: "Thank you both Kaethe and Nilesh. And remember; I could be right too. What do we know what Collins eat everyday? Her favorite food? Could there be some significance with the fact that she chose the..."

Funny, very funny! You should write a whole review out of that.


Nilesh Kashyap s.penkevich wrote: "Nilesh wrote: "s.penkevich wrote: "Hey great review. I find it hard to trust most review out there for this book, but this one seemed to be honest and to the point. I guess I should just read it an..."

I'm thinking of reading Twilight just to find why it is so much read book yet so much hated.
When that robot love drama comes I'm probably going to hide behind my collection of classics.


message 22: by s.penkevich (new)

s.penkevich Ha, good plan. Taking shelter in the classics is always for the best.

I had a professor that said the Lit department had to read Twilight to 'better understand what their students read'. Apparently there is one page that uses the word 'I' over 40 times. From what I understood, its juvenile writing with a sensationalized plot. However, I find it interesting the author had a degree in creative writing and is also a Lit professor. So who knows, maybe it just gets a bad rap. I'll be looking forward to your thoughts when you read it. Maybe I should join in.


Nilesh Kashyap s.penkevich wrote: "Ha, good plan. Taking shelter in the classics is always for the best.

I had a professor that said the Lit department had to read Twilight to 'better understand what their students read'. Apparen..."


Whatever bad I have heard of twilight is very much summed up in Brian' review and it is the most funniest review I have ever read. www.goodreads.com/review/show/79627614


Traveller I finally finished it, and I'm surprised you even gave it 2. It's abysmal. I like a lot of the points you made in your review though. I'll also do a proper review shortly.


Nilesh Kashyap Traveller wrote: "I finally finished it, and I'm surprised you even gave it 2. It's abysmal. I like a lot of the points you made in your review though. I'll also do a proper review shortly."

I gave it 2 stars, because I liked the world building part and maybe I would have rated it with 1 star too if I would have read any other dystopian novel earlier.


Kaethe I look forward to reading your review, Traveller, even if you are harshing my mellow.


message 27: by sanshow (last edited May 24, 2012 11:01PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

sanshow For me, it was kinda like the opposite. The movie was ok, while I thought the book shed more light on Katniss' personality (she's emotionally disconnected, which makes it hard for a 'deeper' descriptions of things - quite like Clay from Less Than Zero. In a way, she is guarded even against her own self because at the core she cares too much - I don't know how to explain this, but I can certainly relate to that kind of feeling). I think some of the views expressed in The Girl Who Was on Fire: Your Favorite Authors on Suzanne Collins' Hunger Games Trilogy say it best.

Maybe it's because I watched the movie first before reading the series, so at least I could flesh out the characters better (although certain characters like Haymitch and Cinna turned out differently in my mind, since I actually know some people who are Haymitch and Cinna). Certainly if I hadn't watched the movie my views would've been different, since I'm a visual type who need to have a picture of how the main characters and the world look like.

Sure the books aren't 'perfect', but when I was reading I wasn't so much as reading it as I was 'in it'. Maybe this was why I overlooked (not intentionally, but by way of being a passenger in the thick of it as opposed to being a calm onlooker) prose, technical issues etc. At one point I stopped judging and instead just feel the story. (Perhaps by virtue of being 'high' or something. I read the whole 3 books as a whole story in about 1 sitting, so yes, not so much as reading but experiencing it). It was an amazing ride for me, hence the 5 stars.

PS: sorry for the long rant. I got carried away in the process :p interesting and funny review, by the way! The second movie should bring the set up a notch, I'd say.


Nilesh Kashyap Emotionally disconnected? I have never come across a character who is emotionally disconnected, so I have no idea what to expect of such characters. I just felt that katniss portrayed in novel didn't looked realistic. She is just 16 y/o and when she goes to capitol and enter games, she experiences many new and interesting things and herself does many other, but there is no excitement, fear or remorse. This is really irritating because she is the narrator of the story.
I also wanted to enjoy the story but I just couldn't, because I had my expectations very high due to its rating and nearly everyone going mad about this book. And I was waiting and waiting and waiting for the point from where it would get really good, in this process the novel ended and I was left staring open-mouthed at the cover thinking, did I read the same book as everyone's.
Oh! and what a bad way to end the games or the story.


Nilesh Kashyap Not only Katniss but all the characters were shallow and looked like they were made for single purpose, take example of Peeta, whose only job was to love Katniss, and the only characters I liked were Haymitch and Cinna, they were only characters more like real people, maybe because they behaved differently under various circumstances, especially Haymitch.
The way movie has been made, it looks likes the makers were expecting that the audience must have read the book first, they escape introducing or explaining few things, somethings will not be too clear for those who have not read the book. I doubt that those who have not read this book will enjoy the movie. And it turned out same with you, but it gave you image of characters.


sanshow Oh I did enjoy the movie too. What I said as opposite was about watching the movie before reading the book. Hmm...I'm kinda emotionally disconnected sometimes (or maybe a lot of times. Ive been accused of that) but for the things I feel strongly about, it really is intense. In that sense I can relate to Katniss' decisions. So boys aren't like this? Like I said, Less Than Zero is similar I think. In that book, the protagonist is pretty much nihilistic, yet...the emotion is there.

Perhaps expectations do play a part, or people's way of viewing things are simply diverse.


Nilesh Kashyap Well, I am having hard time picturing 'emotionally disconnected' person. Can you please explain this thing in terms of Katniss' portrayal in this novel.


message 32: by Traveller (last edited May 30, 2012 11:46AM) (new) - rated it 2 stars

Traveller To me the film was 100x better than the book. It glossed over many of the faults in the book. One of them was indeed the relative emotional inadequacy (I had the feeling that Katniss was autistic in the book) of the protagonist.

In the film her character seems to react in the sort of stunned way that one would expect from someone in her situation. In the book, she just seems like a very self-absorbed, almost antisocial personality.

Also, the film glosses over the morally controversial aspects of the book, like for instance the lack of reluctance on the part of Katniss and Peta to kill.

(Katniss seems to love killing, and she agrees somewhere that killing humans would be similar to killing the animals that she habitually kills).

At the start of the film they do portray this callous aspect of her personality when she wants to shoot the only deer that's been seen around in a year - but at least the complacency Katniss and Peeta seem to feel about killing humans is completely toned down.

In fact, in the film Peta doesn't get to kill an innocent girl like he does in the book; and Katniss doesn't want to (view spoiler)

I still don't agree with the way in which material like this is presented as material for teens and children to read or view, but at least the film handled a lot of aspects better than the book did.


message 33: by Nilesh (last edited May 30, 2012 12:15PM) (new) - rated it 2 stars

Nilesh Kashyap Traveller wrote: "Katniss seems to love killing, and she agrees somewhere that killing humans would be similar to killing the animals that she habitually kills"

I think that was a way in which Collins was trying to convey that Katniss is a real bad-ass character, but what was use of that, if Katniss didn't kill anybody for surviving. She was killing because that was only way out of the situation, the killing by Katniss has been justified by giving various reason so that to make it clear that she is heroine (otherwise how could readers would have liked her) and other tributes are butcher on rampage.


message 34: by Traveller (last edited May 30, 2012 01:01PM) (new) - rated it 2 stars

Traveller The problem is though, that if you set up a character like that in a heroic way, you might find that kids will want to copy her, because she is made to look good in the story, and also, the Hunger Games as an activity is presented in a very glamorous light in both book and film.

I didn't read the 2nd and 3rd books, but apparently at least later in the series Collins does make it clearer that the Hunger Games are despicable, and the protagonists rebel against the institution.

Still, if you publish books on their own, you are setting up a situation where people are going to judge a series by the first book - if they don't like it, they're not going to read any further, and I must say that I found Collins's writing technique so bad that I can't force myself to continue.

Maybe a Sparknotes type summary somewhere might be the answer..


message 35: by Nilesh (last edited Jul 02, 2012 10:02PM) (new) - rated it 2 stars

Nilesh Kashyap I have also been trying to figure out what message does YA-novels try to convey to teenagers, such novels are directly targeted at them. And they can be easily influenced and by more 'cool' looking negative aspects of novel.
I have read two YA-novels, one is this and other is Twilight. I read Twilight recently, about one month ago and I'm till today struggling to write a review of it. What do people love in it? Bella, who keeps 'stumbling' loves Edward, and Edward is a ****ing over-possessive and 'always chuckling' stalker, what does the story try to tell! That stalking is adorable or something like that?
Stephen King said "Harry Potter is about confronting fears, finding inner strength and doing what is right in the face of adversity. Twilight is about how important it is to have a boyfriend."
Its either that YA-novels have nothing good to say other than that bad-assery is really 'cool' or I am missing the right message.


message 36: by sanshow (last edited May 30, 2012 09:56PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

sanshow Nilesh wrote: "Well, I am having hard time picturing 'emotionally disconnected' person. Can you please explain this thing in terms of Katniss' portrayal in this novel."

Maybe like traveller said, Collins should've written this as one book rather than set it to trilogy mode. For me I read all of them at once so I regard it as one story rather than 3 books. As for emotional detachment - I'm not expressive in this sense - most things I could care less and people might accuse me of callousness or just being devoid of emotions. But I hardly open myself up to others, either because they don't matter enough, and even in cases when they matter too much (and sometimes even I don't quite understand myself). When I read characters that don't explain every single emotion or justification for something, I relate to that because people's emotions aren't rational and perhaps for some this might be a turn off, but for me at least it felt right. I mentioned Clay from LTZ as comparison because here you have two extremes - Katniss whose foremost thought is survival, so others don't matter (but past surviving they'd start to) and Clay who has everything so everything doesn't matter. Nevertheless, you can still tell where their bearings lie from the choices they make, in a multitude of scenarios. It does take time. Being emotionally detached doesn't mean heartlessness or not understanding emotions (autism, for example) and morals, it's just that there's a gap between expression and feeling. I call it selective feeling. Maybe it's innate, or maybe circumstances shaped this, who knows..some readers prefer more expression of a character's feelings, some are fine with open ended expressions. First person narratives lend themselves greater ease to either being a love it or hate it story. Yes, it's crucial that you relate to (not necessarily agree or like) the narrator for you to like the book. But like people, not everyone you can get along with. There are lots of 1st person narratives that put me off too, although it's my favourite kind of narrative.

I've said before, I didn't think and ask questions like a spectator would (in which case the movie would work better because it's presented for that purpose) , but rather I was soaking in the experience and the questions asked were more from the perspective of one on site, and that probably contributed to my enjoying the story. And writing that makes me forget I'm a spectator and allows me to enjoy the story like I did is good in my book.


message 37: by Martha (new) - added it

Martha This is funny, my husband just picked this up last weekend & is loving this book & he doesn't like reading (for fun). Very ironic for me!


Nilesh Kashyap sanshow wrote: "Nilesh wrote: "Well, I am having hard time picturing 'emotionally disconnected' person. Can you please explain this thing in terms of Katniss' portrayal in this novel."

Maybe like traveller said, ..."


I agree that many people can have nihilistic approach towards many things, but does killing people or watching other people getting killed too can be moments devoid of emotions, I tend to doubt it. I am not saying that Katniss is heartless, being heartless is also a human aspect. Katniss is unrealistic or unpractical under the circumstances that are shown in the book.
I also doubt that Collins made emotionally disconnected character, but it was unintentional writing flaw. And this flaw of poor characterisation is the reason that there are no other memorable characters in this story.


Nilesh Kashyap Martha wrote: "This is funny, my husband just picked this up last weekend & is loving this book & he doesn't like reading (for fun). Very ironic for me!"

I think, maybe I would have enjoyed it too if I accidentally came across this book in a bookshop instead of goodreads, which tied a boulder of expectations to my reading.


message 40: by Martha (new) - added it

Martha Good point! I can understand that completely! At least we are seeing a different perspective, that is refreshing!


sanshow Nilesh wrote: "Martha wrote: "This is funny, my husband just picked this up last weekend & is loving this book & he doesn't like reading (for fun). Very ironic for me!"

I think, maybe I would have enjoyed it to..."


I agree with this, I watched the movie and read the book with little knowledge of what it's all about save for my sis' constant praise, so I guess that made a difference in reading experience. For most of the YA I've read after coming across shining reviews from GR I tend to find them a letdown...so far, only those recommended through friends or their reviews actually turned out good.


Apatt This is a fantastic review, pity I just came across it today, may have saved me reading the book!


Nilesh Kashyap Thanks Apatt, by the time I posted this review there were only few left to be saved. Only 3 people in this thread have not read it and I'm sure of them 2 will never read, I've a reason to be happy :-)


Haley never read this book never going to!!


Nilesh Kashyap Haley wrote: "never read this book never going to!!"

Did anyhow my review helped in this decision? If yes, then I will be so happy.


Aust* "This book made me think only about, why I didn’t like this book when whole world is enjoying this." LOL exactly my thought


Aydia Faith I found this review incredibly interesting, in its an aspect I never considered because I was able to connect so well to Katniss, in a sense. Katniss lives in a world where everything is different and the fight for survival is on so many fronts its neck breaking. From the games, to life at home, even pure psychological warfare with your own mind. From a young age, Katniss uad to be the one to stand up and take care of her family despite the costs, which lead her to be hard and uncarring. Then the games come around, and now she has to fight to make it, to make sure Prim has someone reliable, has food, etc. It isnt until after the games where everything smashes into her, because now that she isnt fighting for her life, her mind is preoccupied with who she killed and what tried.to kill her. It all made sense to me, how she reacted. However I do feel that it was the overlying story of goverment vs. its people and how it destroys even the most common of human decensies that was supposed to be the main point of the books, not just katniss and her story.

I suppose it comes down to ones personal experiences when you look at relateability and any of the.characters actions. This is why I found your review so interesting, its a different perspective and I love that its made me think! (I do love the HG, by the way. I thought.it.was a good series. the best, no. but good.)
Thats a bit of my take on it, i apologize for the rambling and any typos, i happen to he on my phone and going back and fixing gramatical errors and.typos is a pain. cheers xx


Nilesh Kashyap I am sorry, Aydia! I somehow forgot to reply. Thanks for taking time to comment and I'm glad that you found my review interesting.
I don't want to comment on Katniss anymore, I think my comment would start getting repititive because I have said all I wanted to. Coming to theme of novel, well it was ok for me, had I enjoyed the novel more then I would have been much more impressed by its theme.


Kasia S. I liked the book and I also like your review, it's always fascinating to read different views but I hated the movie, I thought that Jen was dead in the eyes and not even remotely hungry, 2nd book was better in my opinion.


Nilesh Kashyap I thought movie was better than book, Katniss felt real and there was little more focus on other characters unlike book in which only Katniss ruled.
I don't plan to read second book, I don't think YA-novels are for me.


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