Jenny (Reading Envy)'s Reviews > The Cape and Other Stories from the Japanese Ghetto

The Cape and Other Stories from the Japanese Ghetto by Kenji Nakagami
Rate this book
Clear rating

by
68030
's review
Apr 02, 12

bookshelves: short-stories, location-japan, read2012, around-the-world
Read from March 29 to April 01, 2012

This is a book of three stories that are more like novella length. It is a different type of Japan than I am used to reading about from authors like Murakami. I didn't know anything about the burakumin, which is an outcaste class in Japan, a background shared by the author. In fact, from what I read about Nakagami, he pulls from his own life for these stories.

The stories are memorable and disturbing, with themes of violence and complicated relationships. The end of the title story is uncomfortably so.

In Red Hair, I was regretful to be inside the character's head. I would have liked to know what the redheaded girl was thinking; she is often described as tearing up or acting slightly crazy, but I'm not sure I understand why. Kozo, on the other hand, is almost psychopathic in his impassivity towards the woman.
4 likes · likeflag

Sign into Goodreads to see if any of your friends have read The Cape and Other Stories from the Japanese Ghetto.
sign in »

Reading Progress

03/30/2012 page 90
47.0% "Wow, the ending of The Cape was disturbing, to say the least."

Comments (showing 1-5 of 5) (5 new)

dateDown_arrow    newest »

Mikki You started! Maybe I'll get my book out, too. :)


message 2: by Mikki (last edited Apr 02, 2012 08:52AM) (new) - rated it 3 stars

Mikki Thanks, Jenny. I'm eager to learn more about the burakumin and intend to search out other writings (maybe non-fiction) to learn more about the hidden outcaste class of people, as well as the other caste levels.


Jenny (Reading Envy) Mikki wrote: "Thanks, Jenny. I'm eager to learn more about the burakumin and intend to search out other writings (maybe non-fiction) to learn more about the hidden outcaste class of people, as well as the other..."
If you find anything enlightening, do let me know!


Mikki Will do!


Asma Fedosia In reply to Jenny. I think you made a good point about the red-haired woman of the third story. The Afterword to the collection said the protagonists in that story were known by the fragmented parts of their bodies. That literary strategy differed from the usual modern Japanese introspective hero.


back to top