Serena's Reviews > Human Dark with Sugar

Human Dark with Sugar by Brenda Shaughnessy
Rate this book
Clear rating

by
1349220
's review
Aug 13, 2008

it was amazing
Read in April, 2008

Human Dark With Sugar by Brenda Shaughnessy arrived in the mail from the American Academy of Poets and I was pleased because I haven't read a book of poetry in some time. I think that it is only fair that I review this book on this, the last day of National Poetry Month. This second book of poetry from Shaughnessy won the James Laughlin Award.

The first section of the book is Anodyne, also known as a pain-killer. This section of the book is not euphoric by any means. It is almost as if she is attempting to kill the pain with the sharpness of her words. For instance in "I'm Over the Moon:"
"How long do I try to get water from a stone?/It's like having a bad boyfriend in a good band.// Better off alone. I'm going to write hard/and fast into you, moon, face-f**king.//"

The second section of the book is Ambrosia, from the Greek mean of food or drink of the gods that confers immortality on the consumer. Is the narrator of Shaughnessy's poems interested in immortality? One of my favorite poems from this section is "Three Sorries," particularly the "1. I'm Sorry" section of the poem:

"Soon 1. born 1970
2. Cried: all along
3. Loved: you really so very much and no others

blurred into: 1. begging off for the dog-years behavior
2. extra heart hidden in sock drawer
3. undetected slept with others"

It seems as though she really is not sorry for her actions or the events leading up to the incident. It's amazing how many of these poems appear apologetic and wistful on the surface, but then turn to sarcasm and bleakness.

The third section is Astrolabe or astronomical instrument to surveying, locating, and predicting the positions of the sun, moon, and stars. I think the best illustration of this concept is Shaughnessy's "A Poet's Poem."

"I will get the word freshened out of this poem.// I put it in the first line, then moved it to the second./ and now it won't come out.// It's stuck. I'm so frustrated,/ so I went out to my little porch all covered in snow// and watched the icicles drip, as I smoked/a cigarette.//" The poem ends quizzically: "I can't stand myself."

"No Such Thing as One Bee" is another poem that illustrates this need to pinpoint a location. Shaughnessy uses a narrator that is unsure of where they are in life and how they fit into the greater scheme. Where it is a busy worker bee or a bee that goes out to collect pollen. I guess you could almost equate it to the Bee movie with Jerry Seinfeld.

Overall, this is one of the better poetry books I have read in some time. I love the sarcastic and bleak language used by Shaughnessy in her poems. It's the darkest side of humanity she examines, and she tries not to sugarcoat it, but sometimes, she just can't help herself.
2 likes · flag

Sign into Goodreads to see if any of your friends have read Human Dark with Sugar.
Sign In »

Reading Progress

03/20 marked as: read

No comments have been added yet.