Peg's Reviews > Penny and Her Song

Penny and Her Song by Kevin Henkes
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Mar 19, 12

bookshelves: for-fun, highly-recommended, humor, kids_fiction, young-readers
Read on March 09, 2012

Henkes successfully enters the world of early readers in this gentle story of Penny's attempt to divert her parents' attention from the babies to her. Penny's created a song and she is desperate to sing it for them, only to be told several times "Not now." Singing to her mirror or to her glass animals just doesn't do it for her. She tries again at dinner, but of course there's no singing at the table! Her parents help her find the right time to perform; and, after hearing her song, they join in on the next round, and the next, and the next—until singing and laughing has made them all exhausted and put the babies to sleep. Writing for the early reader crowd demands limited vocabulary and can lead to limited storyline, but Henkes has overcome that limitation with a simple, but meaningful, story of patience and understanding. His signature watercolor and ink illustrations in relatively bright shades show both action and emotion and are well placed throughout the text. Unlike Julius, this is not so much a story about jealousy as it is about Penny’s finding her place in the family, about expectations and fun, and making memories.
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message 1: by Peg (new) - rated it 5 stars

Peg Henkes successfully enters the world of early readers in this gentle story of Penny's attempt to divert her parents' attention to her from the babies. She's created a song and she is desperate to sing it for them, only to be told several times "Not now." Singing to her mirror or to her glass animals just doesn't do it for her. She tries again at dinner, but of course there's no singing at the table. Her parents help her find the right time; and, after hearing her song, they join in on the next round, and the next, and the next--until singing and laughing has made them all exhausted and put the babies to sleep. Writing for the early reader crowd demands limited vocabulary and can lead to limited storyline, but Henkes has overcome that limitation with a simple, but meaningful, story of patience and understanding.


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