David Spencer's Reviews > Holy Blood, Holy Grail

Holy Blood, Holy Grail by Michael Baigent
Rate this book
Clear rating

by
4982760
's review
Mar 06, 12

Read on May 01, 1997, read count: 1

Uncritical as I was at age 12, borrowing this from my friend's mom, I would have given this book 5 stars in the feverish conspiracy fugue I was gripped by over the course of reading this. However, my Pyrrhonian skepticism was never far behind any new discovery, and to the internet I turned and found nutjobs mixing less artful and beguiling form and content into their parroting of this book as gospel, and I quickly (with internal irritation at getting suckered) re-read the book with a search engine open in front of me. This was probably the first pop-pseudoacademia book I ever did that with, and back when search engines weren't near as optimized as they are now (although, mercifully, also a day with next to no SEO ads on the internet). And for that initial pull's gravity and a nostalgia for its role in my critical thought, I'm giving it 1 more star than it deserves. Absolutely shit scholarship, very thrilling and fantastical daydream given pomposity and a fart for a breath of life.
likeflag

Sign into Goodreads to see if any of your friends have read Holy Blood, Holy Grail.
sign in »

Comments (showing 1-4 of 4) (4 new)

dateDown_arrow    newest »

message 1: by Bryan (new)

Bryan Schwartz I saw him interviewed once. How is it that nearly every conspiracy nut has terrifying hair? I think that was the moment when I vowed that I'd stay far FAR away from this particular piece of absurdity. I'm glad my suspicions have been confirmed by more honorable evidence.


David Spencer Bryan wrote: "I saw him interviewed once. How is it that nearly every conspiracy nut has terrifying hair? I think that was the moment when I vowed that I'd stay far FAR away from this particular piece of absurdi..."

I pre-judged Dan Brown's book by virtue of the fact that it sounded like he'd ripped off these guys, and these guys weren't any good in the first place. And, of course, it was even worse. And, of course, there was a court case.


message 3: by Bryan (new)

Bryan Schwartz I'm not one to defend Dan Brown but I'm not sure that's entirely fair. At least Brown doesn't market his novels as academic monographs.


David Spencer Bryan wrote: "I'm not one to defend Dan Brown but I'm not sure that's entirely fair. At least Brown doesn't market his novels as academic monographs."

True. But he does market them as readable fiction by a literate person.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/bo...

http://listverse.com/2007/09/02/top-1...


back to top