sckenda's Reviews > The Woven Figure: Conservatism and America's Fabric

The Woven Figure by George F. Will
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Jul 19, 13

bookshelves: politics, conservative, polemic, essays
Read in October, 1998 — I own a copy, read count: 1

A cardinal tenet of conservatism is that social inertia is strong. According to George Will, conservatism discourages "political grandiosity of those who would attempt to engineer the future by rupturing connections with the past." Will's theme is:
The Republic is a woven figure disinclined to unravel the threads that connect it to its antecedents. The central conservative truth is that it is culture, not politics, that determines the success of a society. One count in conservatism’s indictment of liberalism is that liberalism takes too much for granted. Liberalism does to understand how its programs threaten those habits– thrift, industriousness, deferral of gratification- which makes free societies succeed. The severest cost of solicitous government is not monetary but moral. This cost is measure in the diminution of personal responsibility and of private forms of social provision. It might not be such a bad thing if man were a bit more circumscribed by manner and mores, and had a pinch of awe about something other than his own splendor.
I believe that George Will is one of the better writers and more articulate speakers for his viewpoint. I read all points of view because it's the only way I know to escape the ghetto of ideology, to which I refuse to be an indentured servant.

July 19, 2013
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Comments (showing 1-4 of 4) (4 new)

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message 1: by René (new)

René Steve, I like your conclusion. Escaping the ghetto of ideology is admirable and so is reading all points of view. Many people stubbornly refuse to see any view point except their own.


message 2: by Sue (new)

Sue I tend to get my input more from listening to talking heads due to lack of patience more than anything else and I commend you on being better informed than I am and spreading the information.


sckenda René wrote: "Steve, I like your conclusion. Escaping the ghetto of ideology is admirable and so is reading all points of view. Many people stubbornly refuse to see any view point except their own."

I like to steal Tennyson's line, Rene'. I am a part of all that I have met. I steal a little of this ideology and a little of that and mash it up into whatever works. Thanks, Rene.


sckenda Sue wrote: "I tend to get my input more from listening to talking heads due to lack of patience more than anything else and I commend you on being better informed than I am and spreading the information."

Well, I commend you for paying attention at all, Sue. That's better than cynically declaring a pox on all houses and tuning it out. I guess the right mixture of talking heads might lead to a balance of sort. Thanks for reading and commenting.


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